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CPU power regulation

 
 
CTB
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      10-17-2003
I am concerned about using an application that uses my CPU power at 100% for
long periods of time without a break (powerful mathematic/graphic processes
without a break for times in excess of 10 mins). I am running a slightly
overclocked athlon 2800+, and I don't particularly like the idea of running
it at this power for long periods of time without a break. Is there a way
to regulate the cpu usage? I have looked in the task manager but haven't
been able to find anything.. (Windows 2000 Pro SP3) What is a safe temp.
for an athlon 2800+?

Thanks
Jeff


 
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DeMoN LaG
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      10-17-2003
"CTB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:(E-Mail Removed):

> What is a safe temp.
> for an athlon 2800+?


Under 70C is safe, try to keep at 60C or below for longest results. If you
are concerned with heat and running the CPU at full power while
overclocked, um, maybe you didn't think of this but don't overclock it.
What did you overclock it to?

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Larry Smith
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      10-17-2003
> I am concerned about using an application that uses my CPU power at 100%
for
> long periods of time without a break (powerful mathematic/graphic

processes
> without a break for times in excess of 10 mins). I am running a slightly
> overclocked athlon 2800+, and I don't particularly like the idea of

running
> it at this power for long periods of time without a break. Is there a way
> to regulate the cpu usage? I have looked in the task manager but haven't
> been able to find anything.. (Windows 2000 Pro SP3) What is a safe temp.
> for an athlon 2800+?


Overclocking always introduces an element of risk since you're running the
CPU beyond its normal threshold. You may not even be getting the benefit you
think depending on what you're running. Basically, overclocking doesn't
benefit most users and the risk is often far greater than the reward. If its
of any consolation however, CPUs rarely break down in the real world (it has
no moving parts like a drive for instance). You can't generally regulate it
however. The CPU is your computer's brain and most running software requires
it at almost every step. I suggest doing some benchmark tests of your own to
see how fast things run on your overclocked CPU vs when it's running
normally. You may be surprised and find little difference (in which case
don't overclock it and you probably shouldn't anyway).


 
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CTB
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      10-18-2003
Thanks, I do agree with what you both say about overclocking, but even at
'standard' clock speeds is it still reasonably safe to allow the cpu to run
at 100% for long periods of times? If the temp is running too high would
the only option (other than adding better fans/heatsinks etc) be to
underclock?


"Larry Smith" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ucZjb.367457$(E-Mail Removed). cable.rogers.com...
> > I am concerned about using an application that uses my CPU power at 100%

> for
> > long periods of time without a break (powerful mathematic/graphic

> processes
> > without a break for times in excess of 10 mins). I am running a

slightly
> > overclocked athlon 2800+, and I don't particularly like the idea of

> running
> > it at this power for long periods of time without a break. Is there a

way
> > to regulate the cpu usage? I have looked in the task manager but

haven't
> > been able to find anything.. (Windows 2000 Pro SP3) What is a safe

temp.
> > for an athlon 2800+?

>
> Overclocking always introduces an element of risk since you're running the
> CPU beyond its normal threshold. You may not even be getting the benefit

you
> think depending on what you're running. Basically, overclocking doesn't
> benefit most users and the risk is often far greater than the reward. If

its
> of any consolation however, CPUs rarely break down in the real world (it

has
> no moving parts like a drive for instance). You can't generally regulate

it
> however. The CPU is your computer's brain and most running software

requires
> it at almost every step. I suggest doing some benchmark tests of your own

to
> see how fast things run on your overclocked CPU vs when it's running
> normally. You may be surprised and find little difference (in which case
> don't overclock it and you probably shouldn't anyway).
>
>



 
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derek / nul
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      10-18-2003
On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 04:36:38 +1000, "CTB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I am concerned about using an application that uses my CPU power at 100% for
>long periods of time without a break (powerful mathematic/graphic processes
>without a break for times in excess of 10 mins).


Mine runs at 100% for weeks at a time, no problem, that's what it was designed
for.

> I am running a slightly overclocked athlon 2800+,


That is up to you.

>and I don't particularly like the idea of running
>it at this power for long periods of time without a break. Is there a way
>to regulate the cpu usage?


no

> I have looked in the task manager but haven't
>been able to find anything.. (Windows 2000 Pro SP3) What is a safe temp.
>for an athlon 2800+?


I keep mine under 60c
 
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derek / nul
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      10-18-2003
On Sat, 18 Oct 2003 10:07:00 +1000, "CTB" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Thanks, I do agree with what you both say about overclocking, but even at
>'standard' clock speeds is it still reasonably safe to allow the cpu to run
>at 100% for long periods of times? If the temp is running too high would
>the only option (other than adding better fans/heatsinks etc) be to
>underclock?


yes
 
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Wizard
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      10-18-2003
Running a CPU at 100% forever is not a problem as long a you don't
exceed proper temps. Proper cooling is the key.

CTB wrote:
>
> Thanks, I do agree with what you both say about overclocking, but even at
> 'standard' clock speeds is it still reasonably safe to allow the cpu to run
> at 100% for long periods of times? If the temp is running too high would
> the only option (other than adding better fans/heatsinks etc) be to
> underclock?
>
> "Larry Smith" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ucZjb.367457$(E-Mail Removed). cable.rogers.com...
> > > I am concerned about using an application that uses my CPU power at 100%

> > for
> > > long periods of time without a break (powerful mathematic/graphic

> > processes
> > > without a break for times in excess of 10 mins). I am running a

> slightly
> > > overclocked athlon 2800+, and I don't particularly like the idea of

> > running
> > > it at this power for long periods of time without a break. Is there a

> way
> > > to regulate the cpu usage? I have looked in the task manager but

> haven't
> > > been able to find anything.. (Windows 2000 Pro SP3) What is a safe

> temp.
> > > for an athlon 2800+?

> >
> > Overclocking always introduces an element of risk since you're running the
> > CPU beyond its normal threshold. You may not even be getting the benefit

> you
> > think depending on what you're running. Basically, overclocking doesn't
> > benefit most users and the risk is often far greater than the reward. If

> its
> > of any consolation however, CPUs rarely break down in the real world (it

> has
> > no moving parts like a drive for instance). You can't generally regulate

> it
> > however. The CPU is your computer's brain and most running software

> requires
> > it at almost every step. I suggest doing some benchmark tests of your own

> to
> > see how fast things run on your overclocked CPU vs when it's running
> > normally. You may be surprised and find little difference (in which case
> > don't overclock it and you probably shouldn't anyway).
> >
> >

 
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Larry Smith
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Posts: n/a
 
      10-18-2003
> Thanks, I do agree with what you both say about overclocking, but even at
> 'standard' clock speeds is it still reasonably safe to allow the cpu to

run
> at 100% for long periods of times? If the temp is running too high would
> the only option (other than adding better fans/heatsinks etc) be to
> underclock?


As others have pointed out, you can run it at normal speed and temperature
without worry. Put another way, I program for a living (20+ years) and have
worked on servers that grind away 24 x 7 for months at a time with little
break. I have never heard of a machine breaking down (ever) because its CPU
gave out. Your hard drive is a far greater concern.


 
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