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HDD Platter Removal

 
 
Jim Watt
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      12-27-2005
On Tue, 27 Dec 2005 15:43:12 +0000, martin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Nomen Nescio wrote:
>
>> As carefully and cleanly as I could I stripped the thing down and REMOVED
>> the spindle assembly, re-lubricated the so called "greaseless" bearings,
>> reassembled, and one last time used the pencil trick to make the thing run
>> long enough to do a heart stopping "copy d:\*.* c: /a /s" (?) to the third
>> drive.

>
>The trick I used was to soak the bearings in WD40 for 48 hours,
>suprising how long you could keep a drive running if you were really
>careful.
>
>They cost REAL money in those days, and it's not that long ago either.


I recently threw out five racks of AS/400 DASD with 4 x 400mb in each
problem with those was they had a fan sensor that got clogged up and
shut the drive down. The staged power up was awesome, as was the
electricity bill.

and you tell kids that today ...
--
Jim Watt
http://www.gibnet.com
 
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Moe Trin
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      12-27-2005
On Mon, 26 Dec 2005, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in article
<mxZrf.105612$WH.80209@dukeread01>, dnss wrote:

>> You lack the intelligence to educate yourself before posting to Usenet,
>> so why would we assume you're competent enough to remove, pack, and ship
>> a perfectly good platter without destroying it.


That might be one reason no data recovery company won't bother responding
to his childish challenge.

>No one individual, or company, is willing to take up my challenge to
>demonstrate removing a platter from a working hard disk drive and
>recovering the data in an external device.


No - because you miss the elementary fact that YOU (not me, or anyone else
around the world) has to come up with the cash FIRST - AHEAD OF ANY ACTION
before anyone looks at your platter. As noted above, you are quite unable
to grasp the concept that data recovery is a money making business. Or do
you think they are just using Norton Disk Doctor to recover "erased" files
and charging an unrealistic price for that.

If you'd like me to accept your "challenge", send a cashiers check for the
sum of fifteen thousand dollars in United States of America currency. AFTER
IT CLEARS THE ISSUING BANK, I'll put you in contact with a recovery service
so that you can receive specific shipping instructions. Don't like that
stipulation? Then you probably won't like the suggestion to contact your
travel service and arrange transportation to Sparks, NV. There are some
businesses there that (provided you can prove you are over 21) will get
you that blow job for a "fair price" (even though you make not think it
fair).

Old guy
 
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George Orwell
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      12-28-2005
martin wrote:

> Nomen Nescio wrote:
>
>> As carefully and cleanly as I could I stripped the thing down and
>> REMOVED the spindle assembly, re-lubricated the so called "greaseless"
>> bearings, reassembled, and one last time used the pencil trick to make
>> the thing run long enough to do a heart stopping "copy d:\*.* c: /a /s"
>> (?) to the third drive.

>
> The trick I used was to soak the bearings in WD40 for 48 hours, suprising
> how long you could keep a drive running if you were really careful.


I was in a rush, so they only got about 10 minutes of "soaking". Just
wanted the data, didn't care about the drive. But yeah, I remember paying
a couple bucks a Meg for 40M drives back in those days. And a couple
hundred $$$ for a 14.4 Courier.

> They cost REAL money in those days, and it's not that long ago either.


It really wasn't. But it does seem like a long time. I miss those days to
be honest.
 
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dnss
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Jim Watt
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      12-29-2005
On Wed, 28 Dec 2005 12:29:08 -0500, "dnss" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>http://www.actionfront.com/ts_dataremoval.asp#Physical


Interestingly enough the article says it can be done, which is what we
have been trying to tell you. This only leaves the issue of the blow
job, switch off your computer and go out and get one.
--
Jim Watt
http://www.gibnet.com
 
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Fritz Wuehler
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      12-29-2005
dnss wrote:

> http://www.actionfront.com/ts_dataremoval.asp#Physical


"...technology does not exist to remove the platters (without extensive
control measures) from one device and read them back with another machine."

"At Data Recovery Labs, we have been successful in many forms of platter
transplants..."

Knuckle dragging moron... you're OWN CITE says you're full of ****.

 
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John Hyde
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      12-30-2005
on 12/26/2005 11:46 AM dnss said the following:
> "Moe Trin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>On Sun, 25 Dec 2005, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in

>
> article
>
>><mjxrf.100280$WH.17936@dukeread01>, dnss wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I will remove 1 platter from a non defective hdd and mail it to you

>>
>>Not the best idea - exposing the platter to the trials of snail-mail
>>outside of the case is going to increase your costs, as the disks will
>>have to be cleaned before mounting. Given the quality of my mail delivery
>>service, you may also need to have the platters rolled flat again too.
>>
>>
>>>(please provide a snail mail address).
>>>Please respond with complete details of the data recovery.
>>>IF you are successful in this process I can send you work on a steady

>
> basis!
>
>>Ontrack disk recovery www.ontrack.com/ www.ontrack.de/

>
> www.ontrack.co.uk/
>
>>and so on. Do a google search, and get thousands of hits.
>>

>
>
> Wrong again, ontrack does not have this capability unless it was developed
> in the last 6 months.
> Try harder with some facts.
>
>
>


No? from their top 10 list:

Don’t Try this at Home – A man attempting to recover data from his
computer on his own found the job too challenging mid-way through and
ended up sending Ontrack his completely disassembled drive – with each
of its parts in a separate baggie.

and

During a multi-drive RAID recovery, engineers discovered one drive
belonging in the set was missing. The customer found the missing drive
in a dumpster, but in compliance with company policy for disposing of
old drives, it had a hole drilled through it.

and

Suffering from Art – While rearranging her home office, a woman
accidentally dropped a five pound piece of clay pottery on her laptop,
directly onto the hard drive area that contained a book she’d been
working on for five years and 150 year-old genealogy pictures that had
not yet been printed.

All sounds like disassembled or physically damaged drives to me. Isn't
that what you said was not possible?

JH
 
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John Hyde
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      12-30-2005
on 12/26/2005 7:04 AM Jeff said the following:
> bavis wrote:
>
>> We want to be able to dismantle HDD's and destroy the platters to
>> ensure the data is destroyed. This seems to require a special tool to
>> remove the platters from the spindle on some of the older drives. The
>> spindle appears to be held on with some sort of odd plate type thing
>> with 6 slots on the edges. Is there a tool somewhere to remove this?
>> Any recommendations on getting them off? Thanks.
>>

>
> http://www.lowes.com/lkn?action=prod...79-302-1198400
>


LOL Reading the Feenburg article have you??

Jh
 
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Data Recovery Expert
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      12-30-2005
Data Recovery from physically bad Hard drive is possible is Platters of
the disk are well

Doesn't matter, if head is crashed logic card is burnt of there is any
other problem.

Online trainings for physical data recovery are also available now...

see http://www.datadoctor.biz/drcguide.htm

Regards

T.T.



John Hyde wrote:
> on 12/26/2005 11:46 AM dnss said the following:
> > "Moe Trin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> >>On Sun, 25 Dec 2005, in the Usenet newsgroup alt.computer.security, in

> >
> > article
> >
> >><mjxrf.100280$WH.17936@dukeread01>, dnss wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I will remove 1 platter from a non defective hdd and mail it to you
> >>
> >>Not the best idea - exposing the platter to the trials of snail-mail
> >>outside of the case is going to increase your costs, as the disks will
> >>have to be cleaned before mounting. Given the quality of my mail delivery
> >>service, you may also need to have the platters rolled flat again too.
> >>
> >>
> >>>(please provide a snail mail address).
> >>>Please respond with complete details of the data recovery.
> >>>IF you are successful in this process I can send you work on a steady

> >
> > basis!
> >
> >>Ontrack disk recovery www.ontrack.com/ www.ontrack.de/

> >
> > www.ontrack.co.uk/
> >
> >>and so on. Do a google search, and get thousands of hits.
> >>

> >
> >
> > Wrong again, ontrack does not have this capability unless it was developed
> > in the last 6 months.
> > Try harder with some facts.
> >
> >
> >

>
> No? from their top 10 list:
>
> Don't Try this at Home - A man attempting to recover data from his
> computer on his own found the job too challenging mid-way through and
> ended up sending Ontrack his completely disassembled drive - with each
> of its parts in a separate baggie.
>
> and
>
> During a multi-drive RAID recovery, engineers discovered one drive
> belonging in the set was missing. The customer found the missing drive
> in a dumpster, but in compliance with company policy for disposing of
> old drives, it had a hole drilled through it.
>
> and
>
> Suffering from Art - While rearranging her home office, a woman
> accidentally dropped a five pound piece of clay pottery on her laptop,
> directly onto the hard drive area that contained a book she'd been
> working on for five years and 150 year-old genealogy pictures that had
> not yet been printed.
>
> All sounds like disassembled or physically damaged drives to me. Isn't
> that what you said was not possible?
>
> JH


 
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martin
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      12-30-2005
Data Recovery Expert wrote:
> Data Recovery from physically bad Hard drive is possible is Platters of
> the disk are well
>
> Doesn't matter, if head is crashed logic card is burnt of there is any
> other problem.
>
> Online trainings for physical data recovery are also available now...
>
> see http://www.datadoctor.biz/drcguide.htm
>
> Regards
>
> T.T.


that is just ****ing frightening you spamming moron
 
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