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good firewall

 
 
Tom
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2005
I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
product. Some are very difficult to remove.
My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice is
appreciated....

Thanks


 
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optikl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2005
Tom wrote:
Any advice is
> appreciated....
>
> Thanks
>
>


It would help to know your circumstances 1st and what you need in a
firewall.

1. Are you using a high speed connection (Cable/DSL)?
2. If so, are you behind a router (wired/wireless)?
3. Are you running Windows XP?
4. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being highest), how important to you is
application/component control?
 
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nemo_outis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
"Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed):

> I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
> sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
> another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
> My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
> firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
> understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
> good. Any advice is appreciated....
>
> Thanks
>
>



All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
good you are changing.

How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
better protection.)

Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.

Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.

For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
them (outbound).

http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm

There is lots worth reading on this site.

You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
specific thread cited below:

http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298

It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."

Regards,



 
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Ken
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
nemo_outis wrote:
> "Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
> news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed):
>
>
>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
>>good. Any advice is appreciated....
>>
>>Thanks
>>
>>

>
>
>
> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
> good you are changing.
>
> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
> better protection.)
>
> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
> therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
> virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
> better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
> antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
>
> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
> hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
> Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
>
> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
> them (outbound).
>
> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
>
> There is lots worth reading on this site.
>
> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
> specific thread cited below:
>
> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
>
> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
> is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
> ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
> preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
> packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
> have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
>
> Regards,


I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.

Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.

Ken

 
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nemo_outis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> nemo_outis wrote:
>> "Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>> news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed):
>>
>>
>>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
>>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
>>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
>>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
>>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
>>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm
>>>is good. Any advice is appreciated....
>>>
>>>Thanks
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
>> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
>> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
>> good you are changing.
>>
>> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
>> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
>> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can
>> give better protection.)
>>
>> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box"
>> and is therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall
>> and anti- virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're
>> skilled, you're better off with separates. The chance of the best
>> firewall and the best antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
>>
>> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require
>> some hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings
>> are Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look
>> 'n Stop.
>>
>> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
>> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to
>> bypass them (outbound).
>>
>> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
>>
>> There is lots worth reading on this site.
>>
>> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
>> specific thread cited below:
>>
>> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
>>
>> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only"
>> configuration is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router.
>> Even the very cheap ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with
>> just NAT are excellent at preventing **inbound** attacks; the more
>> expensive ones add SPI (stateful packet inspection) and also features
>> (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must have" firewall feature is high
>> on the list of "nice-to-haves."
>>
>> Regards,

>
> I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here.
> I have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
> RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have
> been thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at
> work suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the
> setup and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise,
> although I would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able
> to access my computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two
> homes over the next few years and it would help to be able to keep
> info in just one place.
>
> Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus
> others I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is
> overkill for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My
> bottom line is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am
> willing to spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want
> to overspend.
>
> Ken
>
>



My first thoughts are that The Cisco Pix, while lovely, really is
overkill - sorta like driving a Porsche 911 to work Moreover, if you
are keen for VPN there are quite satisfactory ways of obtaining it either
in hardware or software (software is fine for a "reasonably small" number
of users). See, for instance, OpenVPN at:

http://openvpn.net/

....or even the primitive but serviceable built-in version in Windows.

Nope, your netgear is entirely satisfactory for stopping incoming malware
(backed up by Zonealarm) and Zonealarm will do a decent job of stopping
outgoing stuff.

Now spend some time on the weakest link in your security: you!

Ignorance, laziness, false pride, and carelessness will be the downfall
of us all - technology just lets us get it done a little faster

Regards,



 
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nemo_outis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:(E-Mail Removed):

> nemo_outis wrote:
>> "Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>> news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed):
>>
>>
>>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
>>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
>>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
>>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
>>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
>>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm
>>>is good. Any advice is appreciated....
>>>
>>>Thanks
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
>> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
>> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
>> good you are changing.
>>
>> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
>> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
>> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can
>> give better protection.)
>>
>> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box"
>> and is therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall
>> and anti- virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're
>> skilled, you're better off with separates. The chance of the best
>> firewall and the best antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
>>
>> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require
>> some hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings
>> are Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look
>> 'n Stop.
>>
>> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
>> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to
>> bypass them (outbound).
>>
>> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
>>
>> There is lots worth reading on this site.
>>
>> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
>> specific thread cited below:
>>
>> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
>>
>> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only"
>> configuration is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router.
>> Even the very cheap ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with
>> just NAT are excellent at preventing **inbound** attacks; the more
>> expensive ones add SPI (stateful packet inspection) and also features
>> (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must have" firewall feature is high
>> on the list of "nice-to-haves."
>>
>> Regards,

>
> I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here.
> I have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
> RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have
> been thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at
> work suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the
> setup and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise,
> although I would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able
> to access my computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two
> homes over the next few years and it would help to be able to keep
> info in just one place.
>
> Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus
> others I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is
> overkill for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My
> bottom line is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am
> willing to spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want
> to overspend.
>
> Ken
>
>



My first thoughts are that The Cisco Pix, while lovely, really is
overkill - sorta like driving a Porsche 911 to work Moreover, if you
are keen for VPN there are quite satisfactory ways of obtaining it either
in hardware or software (software is fine for a "reasonably small" number
of users). See, for instance, OpenVPN at:

http://openvpn.net/

....or even the primitive but serviceable built-in version in Windows.

Nope, your netgear is entirely satisfactory for stopping incoming malware
(backed up by Zonealarm) and Zonealarm will do a decent job of stopping
outgoing stuff.

Now spend some time on the weakest link in your security: you!

Ignorance, laziness, false pride, and carelessness will be the downfall
of us all - technology just lets us get it done a little faster

Regards,



 
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Tom
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
I am running XP Pro on a small home network. I have a DLink DI-524 wireless
router. However only one of the 3 computers are wireless. Two of them are
wired and one is wireless. I have all three online, but they cannot see each
other, which is another issue. I have a DSL connection and i would say a 2
or 3 on control. I do not want so much funtionality that i have to set each
site, if ya know what i mean. I want pretty much to install it and know i am
protected....thanks for the help and advice....


"optikl" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Tom wrote:
> Any advice is
> > appreciated....
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> >

>
> It would help to know your circumstances 1st and what you need in a
> firewall.
>
> 1. Are you using a high speed connection (Cable/DSL)?
> 2. If so, are you behind a router (wired/wireless)?
> 3. Are you running Windows XP?
> 4. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being highest), how important to you is
> application/component control?



 
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Ken Ward
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 21:09:34 -0800, Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>nemo_outis wrote:
>> "Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>> news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed):
>>
>>
>>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
>>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
>>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
>>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
>>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
>>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
>>>good. Any advice is appreciated....
>>>
>>>Thanks
>>>
>>>

>>
>>
>>
>> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
>> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
>> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
>> good you are changing.
>>
>> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
>> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
>> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
>> better protection.)
>>
>> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
>> therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
>> virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
>> better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
>> antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
>>
>> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
>> hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
>> Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
>>
>> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
>> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
>> them (outbound).
>>
>> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
>>
>> There is lots worth reading on this site.
>>
>> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
>> specific thread cited below:
>>
>> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
>>
>> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
>> is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
>> ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
>> preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
>> packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
>> have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
>>
>> Regards,

>
>I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
>have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
>RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
>thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
>suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
>and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
>would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
>computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
>next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.
>
>Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
>I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
>for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
>is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
>spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.
>
>Ken

If you are already using Netgear, what about the Netgear FR114P?
http://www.netgear.com/products/details/FR114P.php

 
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Ken
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005
Ken Ward wrote:
> On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 21:09:34 -0800, Ken <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>>nemo_outis wrote:
>>
>>>"Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
>>>news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed) t:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
>>>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
>>>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
>>>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
>>>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
>>>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
>>>>good. Any advice is appreciated....
>>>>
>>>>Thanks
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
>>>Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
>>>frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
>>>good you are changing.
>>>
>>>How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
>>>instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
>>>rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
>>>better protection.)
>>>
>>>Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
>>>therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
>>>virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
>>>better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
>>>antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
>>>
>>>Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
>>>hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
>>>Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
>>>
>>>For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
>>>firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
>>>them (outbound).
>>>
>>>http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
>>>
>>>There is lots worth reading on this site.
>>>
>>>You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
>>>specific thread cited below:
>>>
>>>http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
>>>
>>>It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
>>>is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
>>>ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
>>>preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
>>>packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
>>>have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
>>>
>>>Regards,

>>
>>I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
>>have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
>>RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
>>thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
>>suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
>>and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
>>would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
>>computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
>>next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.
>>
>>Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
>>I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
>>for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
>>is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
>>spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.
>>
>>Ken

>
> If you are already using Netgear, what about the Netgear FR114P?
> http://www.netgear.com/products/details/FR114P.php
>

I will check into this equipment. I am not wedded to Netgear; I
happened to have purchased it years ago because it allowed for an easy
port forwarding setup, which I needed at the time. I also use Buffalo
Tech for my wireless bridge (two WBR G54s), two Linksys switches, and a
Linksys wireless router/switch as a wireless access piont), so you can
see I am not wedded to Netgear. Linksys usually tests pretty well in
the magazines, although I am not sure how honest the testing is. As
Linksys is a Cisco company, however, perhaps they have some equipment
worth looking at that would allow for a VPN?

Thanks
Ken
 
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icono
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2005

"Tom" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:kNlpf.11228$(E-Mail Removed).. .
>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
> when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
> product. Some are very difficult to remove.
> My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
> Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
> configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice
> is
> appreciated....
>
> Thanks
>
>


There are several great answers already given.

The PRIMARY thing you need to do is try very hard to remove all traces of
Norton. You probably wont be able to do such, but try. I have seen (not my
computer) where even using their special program (SymNRT) for removal,
cleaning the registry (required because they flat out LIE about the
removal), and using an Xp repair mode, the computer still thinks it has a
Norton Firewall.

My own personal one is System Suite by VCOM. It seems to work and has
several other neat capabilities. That and running through a router that has
its own firewall seems to work quite well as I get into some areas and
interchange while interacting with other computer systems that I find are
bad at best.

As a result of helping others with computer problems (for pay naturally), I
have learned to avoid like the plague, Norton and MacAfee. It's sort of
like, If it comes free on a new computer and you activate it, you've been
had.


 
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