Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Security > Video Professor not so smart....

Reply
Thread Tools

Video Professor not so smart....

 
 
Herbert West
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-14-2004
This is sort of security related...

Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)

The newest computer education CD is all about "Identity Theft." I was
wondering when he'd start cashing in on this! His new ad uses the all
the usual FUD tactics the other scammers use to get you to
buy^H^H^Hrequest the CD. He even "admits" that he, himself was a
victim of identity theft and that it cost him many thousands to clean
the mess up. Gee, if he is half the computer genius he claims to be,
he's never have committed anything so clueless that would get his
udentity stolen via computers. Just a marketing ploy.

I wonder how much it actually costs to produce, advertise and
distribute these free CD's... He definitely makes his money on the
shipping charges. Of course, these "free" offerings are come-ons for
more expensive full-sized courses that cost quite a bit more...

I just got a chuckle out such a computer "expert" claim to be a victim
of his own lack of basic computer security kinowledge, even if I
realize it's probably untrue and just a marketing ploy.

 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
geek@foo.org
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-14-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Herbert West <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>This is sort of security related...
>
>Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)
>


I always have to laugh at shipping charges, since it costs 37 cents, the price
of a single stamp to send a CD thrugh the mail. I send recorded live
concerts to friends all the time. One ounce. One stamp. That's it.
--
--
Computers are like air conditioning.
Neither one works when you open windows.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Lou
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-15-2004
On 14 Sep 2004 08:55:05 -0400, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>Herbert West <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>This is sort of security related...
>>
>>Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)
>>

>
>I always have to laugh at shipping charges, since it costs 37 cents, the price
>of a single stamp to send a CD thrugh the mail. I send recorded live
>concerts to friends all the time. One ounce. One stamp. That's it.


"Satisfaction guaranteed. Money back if you're not happy with our product.**"

<YADDA YADDA>

** Refund original purchase less shipping and handling charges
 
Reply With Quote
 
Ralph A. Jones
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-16-2004
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Herbert West <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>This is sort of security related...
>>
>>Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)
>>

>
>
> I always have to laugh at shipping charges, since it costs 37 cents, the price
> of a single stamp to send a CD thrugh the mail. I send recorded live
> concerts to friends all the time. One ounce. One stamp. That's it.


Let's see now . . . say, on average, the Video Professor "sells"/gives
away 20,000 CD's per infomercial. His production costs are $.50 per CD.
His actual shipping cost, as you point out, is $.37. The infomercial
costs him $100,000 per. He grosses $139,000. His costs are $117,400.
He nets $21,600. He does 10 informercials per month -- that's $216,000,
times 12 months, equals $2,592,000. I'm thinkin' maybe the Video
Professor is not so dumb. ;-{)>
 
Reply With Quote
 
Leythos
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-16-2004
In article <g5h2d.9$(E-Mail Removed)>,
rajones@SPAM_ME_NOT_AT_tconl.com says...
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
> > In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > Herbert West <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >
> >>This is sort of security related...
> >>
> >>Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)
> >>

> >
> >
> > I always have to laugh at shipping charges, since it costs 37 cents, the price
> > of a single stamp to send a CD thrugh the mail. I send recorded live
> > concerts to friends all the time. One ounce. One stamp. That's it.

>
> Let's see now . . . say, on average, the Video Professor "sells"/gives
> away 20,000 CD's per infomercial. His production costs are $.50 per CD.
> His actual shipping cost, as you point out, is $.37. The infomercial
> costs him $100,000 per. He grosses $139,000. His costs are $117,400.
> He nets $21,600. He does 10 informercials per month -- that's $216,000,
> times 12 months, equals $2,592,000. I'm thinkin' maybe the Video
> Professor is not so dumb. ;-{)>


The math is slightly flawed - there is the cost of salaries for the
people stuffing the packages, cost of answering the phones, etc.... I
bet he only nets about $10,000 per show on average - still a very nice
number.

--
--
(E-Mail Removed)
(Remove 999 to reply to me)
 
Reply With Quote
 
Herbert West
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-20-2004
On Thu, 16 Sep 2004 09:06:13 -0500, "Ralph A. Jones"
<rajones@SPAM_ME_NOT_AT_tconl.com> wrote:

>(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>> Herbert West <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>This is sort of security related...
>>>
>>>Anybody see the Video Professor's newest "free" CD? (Only $6.95!!!)
>>>


In his adverts for his latest "Identity Theft" lesson, Mr. Scherer
uses the same sleazy FUD and scare tactics as the Internet-based
spam-scammers in order to frighten newbies into rushing into getting
the CD's.

>Let's see now . . . say, on average, the Video Professor "sells"/gives
>away 20,000 CD's per infomercial. His production costs are $.50 per CD.
> His actual shipping cost, as you point out, is $.37. The infomercial
>costs him $100,000 per. He grosses $139,000. His costs are $117,400.
>He nets $21,600. He does 10 informercials per month -- that's $216,000,
>times 12 months, equals $2,592,000. I'm thinkin' maybe the Video
>Professor is not so dumb. ;-{)>


That's not the issue. $6.95 is only the cost of shipping. As they
say in TV: "But wait!!! There's MORE!!!"

Unless the consumer very carefully reads the entire web page, he will
not be aware that the free lesson actually costs $69.95 and that
unless he returns the CD's within 10 days, his credit card will be
billed for the full amount.

The TV ads don't say anything about the full price!

The fine print is that you actually receive a *multiple* CD package,
but only ONE of the CD's in it are free. After receiving the lesson,
you must call them for an RMA to return the "Bonus" within 10 days, or
your credit card will be billed $69.95.

The website hides the expensive truth away on a "How it Works" page
that is very likely to be missed by the average respondant. You do
not have to read the above-mentioned page, to place your order. All
you need do is provide your Credit Card number, Name and address, and
check a nondescript box at the bottom of the order page that states
you read the "How It Works" page.

So, while it's not a true scam in the legal sense, it comes pretty
close by placing undue emphasis that customer need pay only 6.95
shipping, but minimizing any reference to the TRUE COST $69.95!






 
Reply With Quote
 
\Crash\ Dummy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-21-2004
>Unless the consumer very carefully reads the entire web page, he will
>not be aware that the free lesson actually costs $69.95 and that
>unless he returns the CD's within 10 days, his credit card will be
>billed for the full amount.


>The TV ads don't say anything about the full price!


I have only seen the TV ads (with mute mode set). Isn't there an 800 number, or
something? I wonder what they tell you when you call.
--
Dave "Crash" Dummy - A weapon of mass destruction
(E-Mail Removed)?subject=Techtalk (Do not alter!)
http://lists.gpick.com


 
Reply With Quote
 
Herbert West
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-21-2004
On Mon, 20 Sep 2004 21:47:13 -0400, "\"Crash\" Dummy"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>>Unless the consumer very carefully reads the entire web page, he will
>>not be aware that the free lesson actually costs $69.95 and that
>>unless he returns the CD's within 10 days, his credit card will be
>>billed for the full amount.

>
>>The TV ads don't say anything about the full price!

>
>I have only seen the TV ads (with mute mode set). Isn't there an 800 number, or
>something? I wonder what they tell you when you call.


The 800 number goes to one of those boiler-shop contractors that
merely takes orders for other companies. The sales person is just an
order-taker droid who works from a script and doesn't even know WTF
they are actually selling. They just take your name, address and
credit card number and punch it into their keyboard. All she knows is
what is in the script. "That will be $6.95 for shipping. Thank you!
You will receive your CD in 4-6 weeks. Have a good day!"

Once you receive the package, you will find 2 or 3 CD's and upon
reading the contract that comes with them, you find that must return
at least one of them or be billed $69.95.

Several reports I've read also relate that Video Professor' program
operates like the old record-of-the-month clubs. Once you order the
first CD, you will automatically be sent a set of CD lessons each
month, being billed $6.95 shipping. Upon receiving the package, you
must either return at least one of the set of 2-3 CD's, or be billed
$69.95 for the actual "Lesson CD". This will go on on a monthly basis
until you finally opt-out of the entire Video Professor program.

The whole program is opt-out rather than opt-in and they push the
product based upon the *shipping* price, doing very little to make the
customer aware of the true total cost. Unless he very carefully reads
the contract that comes with his "free" CD's, he won't have a clue
until it shows up on his credit card bill later.

I didn't believe it at first, either...

I went to their web-page and started an order for one of the lessons.
I found that I could go from 'Start' to "SUBMIT" (finally commiting my
self!) without having to actually read the "How It Works" page -- All
I needed was to check a box saying that I had read and understood the
"How It Works."

I'd say that it's a "social engineering" approach where the marketters
figure that many suckers will simply tick the checkbox without looking
and commit themselves. It's the same type of social engineering that
suckers people into clicking on executibles they receive in email and
infecting their computers... <g>

Bottom line is the old saying, "If an offer is too good to be true,
it's generally neither good nor true." Buyer beware. And don't
click on things you encounter on the net until afterfully
investigating what they are attached to. <g>


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Arc not what your math professor can do for you Dexter Java 0 03-28-2008 10:52 AM
Video: Professor of Physics Phd at Cal Tech says: 911 Inside Job stj911@rock.com Python 31 05-13-2007 01:28 PM
Video: Professor of Physics, Phd at Cal Tech says: 911 Inside Job stj911@rock.com Python 3 05-03-2007 08:29 AM
The Video Professor Pop Aye Computer Support 1 02-05-2007 03:12 PM
Somewhat OT: Good Xmas gift for a C++ professor? Mark Bruno C++ 2 12-12-2004 03:20 AM



Advertisments