Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > VOIP > Can my employer "hear" my SKYPE phone calls

Reply
Thread Tools

Can my employer "hear" my SKYPE phone calls

 
 
DevilsPGD
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
In message <(E-Mail Removed)> Susan
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>>>Explain please. Skype calls are supposed to be encrypted, so how would your
>>>"Yes" make sense if this is the case? Decryption would take place on the
>>>system the program is running...

>>
>> If I were an IT admin and noticed unexplained traffic, I might be
>> tempted to monitor the traffic.
>>
>> If it is, in fact, encrypted (I believe Skype is, but I'm not a user so
>> I don't know or care), I'd simply monitor the PC itself.
>>
>> If it looked like VoIP traffic, installing something to monitor the
>> microphone and speakers and check the times when I saw the unexplained
>> traffic would quickly identify whether it's VoIP or not.

>
>Oh good. I think you are saying my SKYPE calls are protected because they
>use some kind of security between the two SKYPE programs.
>
>Does that mean that even if my employer saved all the VOIP communication
>between the two of us, that they would not have the "security key" to
>actually listen to the words we spoke?
>
>Is that what you are saying?
>Susan


No, what I'm saying is that whether or not the encryption is breakable,
it wouldn't stop a bored IT person.

--
HAM AND EGGS: A day's work for a chicken; A lifetime commitment for a pig
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
{{{{{Welcome}}}}}
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
Thus spaketh Christian 'CeeJay' Jensen:
> Ivor Jones wrote:
>> "Christian 'CeeJay' Jensen" <(E-Mail Removed)>
>> wrote in message
>> news:44bf61c0$0$84018$(E-Mail Removed) k
>>> Ivor Jones wrote:
>>>> "Susan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>>> news:6ht7omr4mzik.1uvihp4emtutz$(E-Mail Removed)
>>>>
>>>> [snip]
>>>>
>>>>> Can they "hear" my SKYPE phone calls if they wanted
>>>>> to? Do employers typically "listen" to this type of
>>>>> activity?
>>>> No, but if you are using work equipment for personal
>>>> use then they would have every right to do so.
>>>>
>>>>> Please advise me as this is a personal matter all
>>>>> mixed up with work and the need to remain private.
>>>> Then don't use work equipment.
>>>>
>>>> Ivor
>>> Wow Ivor - that's some attitude .. What sort of police
>>> state do you live in ?

>>
>> One where using company equipment for personal use is not generally
>> accepted. Would you like it if I came round to your place and used
>> your system for my own use without asking..?

>
> That not an apples to apples comparison.
> Come up with a better analogy if you want to use this kind of
> reasoning.
>
>> If a company provides you with computer equipment they do so in
>> order that you can do your job, not so you can waste company time on
>> the net.

>
> I'd like to offer you a different point of view :
>
> Treat your employees right and they will in turn treat you right.
> .. I think the bible was first on that one though .. "Do unto others
> as you would have them do unto you"
>


Trouble is the bible is just a book of fiction.



> Creating a workenvironment where workers feel constantly watched and
> measured , untrusted and uncared for , leads to unhappy workers.
> Unhappy workers leads to decreased productivity , decreased service
> and more sickdays .. and THAT costs money.



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Lee Babcock
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
Susan wrote:
>>> Explain please. Skype calls are supposed to be encrypted, so how would your
>>> "Yes" make sense if this is the case? Decryption would take place on the
>>> system the program is running...

>> If I were an IT admin and noticed unexplained traffic, I might be
>> tempted to monitor the traffic.
>>
>> If it is, in fact, encrypted (I believe Skype is, but I'm not a user so
>> I don't know or care), I'd simply monitor the PC itself.
>>
>> If it looked like VoIP traffic, installing something to monitor the
>> microphone and speakers and check the times when I saw the unexplained
>> traffic would quickly identify whether it's VoIP or not.

>
> Oh good. I think you are saying my SKYPE calls are protected because they
> use some kind of security between the two SKYPE programs.
>
> Does that mean that even if my employer saved all the VOIP communication
> between the two of us, that they would not have the "security key" to
> actually listen to the words we spoke?
>
> Is that what you are saying?
> Susan

Your traffic on your employers computers is as private as a message
written on a post card and put in regular mail.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Herne
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Thu, 20 Jul 2006 23:01:52 +0200, Christian 'CeeJay' Jensen
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in Message-ID:
<44bfef2e$0$84031$(E-Mail Removed)>

[snip]

> I'd like to offer you a different point of view :
>
> Treat your employees right and they will in turn treat you right. .. I
> think the bible was first on that one though .. "Do unto others as you
> would have them do unto you"
>
> Creating a work environment where workers feel constantly watched and
> measured, untrusted and uncared for, leads to unhappy workers. Unhappy
> workers leads to decreased productivity, decreased service and more
> sickdays .. and THAT costs money.


This last paragraph sound very much like my previous employer. Their
response was to put more pressure on their employees, demanding more and
more be produced in less and less time. People were fired for even the
most trivial breaches of the rules. To listen to company management,
all they did was whine about how it was so hard to find people--during
the time I was there, the wages actually dropped 15% for new-hires, so
there was even more pressure to get those more experienced workers out
so they could be replaced by lower-paid new-hires.

This is the reality in much of corporate America today; companies will
vie for government handouts, and will move to new locations when the
handouts stop after a few years. They'll locate in relatively-depressed
areas, with little work opportunities, knowing they've got a captive
workforce. Most of the people I worked with were single-mothers; the
employer knew they _needed_ their job to feed their kids, so they'd put
up with just about anything to keep it, knowing full-well that there
were almost no alternatives for them.

The rates of absenteeism were very high; people were just stressed-out
to the breaking point. Virtually everyone that I knew was on medication
to help them cope with the stress.

The sweatshops of the 19th and early-20th century featured sewing-machines;
those of the 21st now feature computers.

Herne <(E-Mail Removed)-rhei.eu.org>

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: N/A

iD8DBQFEwFYah0fX3LEFYPsRAlB1AJ9aL44IrHj7WGmMgthdLe qPcyY+8wCeKmCM
3ZBlEFR3LJ/4tpEfnD8uNP0=
=xEyb
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

 
Reply With Quote
 
Susan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
Oh my. Is this the summary.

1. The employer can "see" SKYPE calls but not "hear" them.
2. Unless they "tap" your sound card (is that hard or easy on a network?).
3. The SKYPE encryption has been broken.
4. It's safer to buy a cell phone and sim card.

I didn't think about the cell phone idea.
Are you saying I can get a phone with TWO sim cards. One for my normal use
and one for my, shall we say, personal issues?

If I switch from one sim card to the next, does that guarrantee me being
anonymous? That is, if a certain someone at home were to flip through the
cell phone with the "home" sim card in, would he be able to see the calls
made from the "personal" sim card?

I'm so confused but I do revere your advice,
Susan
 
Reply With Quote
 
TwistyCreek
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006



Yes you are.

Kenny G.
---

In news:14sdtb1s7rttz.jrbypzl5e1nb$(E-Mail Removed),
Susan <(E-Mail Removed)> had this to say:
>I'm so confused
>
>


 
Reply With Quote
 
Tim Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
In article <6ht7omr4mzik.1uvihp4emtutz$(E-Mail Removed)>, Susan wrote:
> Please advise me as this is a personal matter all mixed up with work and
> the need to remain private.


Get a prepaid cell phone and use that.

--
--Tim Smith
 
Reply With Quote
 
Tim Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Susan wrote:
> Does that mean that even if my employer saved all the VOIP communication
> between the two of us, that they would not have the "security key" to
> actually listen to the words we spoke?


They don't need the key. They have this:

"Tell us who these calls were to, and what they were about, or you
are fired"

That works as good as having the key.

--
--Tim Smith
 
Reply With Quote
 
Huss
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
In message <6ht7omr4mzik.1uvihp4emtutz$(E-Mail Removed)>, Susan
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>Can my employer "hear" my SKYPE phone calls?


Can he stand outside your office door?

>Can SKYPE be my answer to the privacy I desperately need?


No. You've been given good advice WRT prepay mobile phones and I'd take
that if I were you. It's not worth the risk. Maybe giving your husband
the push would be a good start.

(Rest snipped)
--
Huss

They come together like the Coroner's Inquest, to sit upon the murdered
reputations of the week.

William Congreve

 
Reply With Quote
 
Al Klein
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-21-2006
On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 05:48:12 GMT, Susan <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Oh my. Is this the summary.
>
>1. The employer can "see" SKYPE calls but not "hear" them.
>2. Unless they "tap" your sound card (is that hard or easy on a network?).


It makes "easy" seem difficult. It's trivial for anyone who's taken
an electronics course in high school. Network or not, it's done right
on the computer. And it's easily done inside the computer, with a
tiny component, so unless you know what you're looking for, and where
it is, you'd never notice it.

>Are you saying I can get a phone with TWO sim cards. One for my normal use
>and one for my, shall we say, personal issues?


If you have a cell phone with a SIM card (Verizon, for one, uses
technology that doesn't use SIM cards), go to a cell phone store - one
where the employees know what they're doing - and ask them to show you
how to swap SIM cards in your phone. You can get adapters to use 2
cards in one phone, but they're not common in the US yet.

>If I switch from one sim card to the next, does that guarrantee me being
>anonymous? That is, if a certain someone at home were to flip through the
>cell phone with the "home" sim card in, would he be able to see the calls
>made from the "personal" sim card?


Yes, if your phone keeps your calls list in the phone, not in the
card. Some do one, some do the other, some can be set to do whichever
you want. A second phone is easier and safer. Just leave it in your
desk drawer at work.

Wouldn't a divorce be a lot simpler?
--
http://www.webdingers.com/filelist.html
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
USB Skype gateway AU-600--Can divert all of your Skype calls to your mobile. dianasun via HWKB.com VOIP 1 09-14-2009 12:29 PM
USB Skype box AU-600 forward Skype calls to mobile phone or traditional phone dianasun VOIP 0 06-01-2006 07:00 AM
USB Skype gateway AU-600--Can divert all of your Skype calls to your mobile. dianasun VOIP 1 11-17-2005 03:07 PM
MoVoIP - FREE MOBILE Inetrnet Phone Calls - FREE Internet Phone Calls ubifone VOIP 0 07-29-2005 04:31 PM



Advertisments