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Value of Cisco training and certs

 
 
none
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      06-14-2006
I have a slightly different question, especially geared to those who
have MCSEs and CCNA. A little re-assurance or reality check would help,
especially being in the "Show-Me" state of Missouri.

I enrolled in the local Cisco Academy for this fall. I have 2 rather
under utilized NT4.0 and Win2k MCSEs, an A+ and 3 MOS certifications.
Currently, I work at a call center. I am hoping as I approach 40 this
February, that the CCNA and possible CCNP will help me break out of my
mold, and actually aid in making more money, especially to legitimate
the vast amounts I have spent already. Yes, I was one of those folks who
got involved in computer work in 1999 for the cash, until the bottom
fell out. Now, I figure it's time to fully succeed with the Cisco stuff
and subsequent job prospects, or come up with a new career plan. I
don't feel great about this path, but my friends who have taken some of
the classes urge me on, saying it should help vastly.

Has anyone out there had under-utilized skills or certifications, but
found that Cisco certifications improved their lot? Is it possible to
actually find a job, preferably day-shift because Cisco really helped to
increase skillset and marketability?
Any feedback in this news group would be helpful and most appreciated.

Thanks ,
David
 
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Newbie72
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      06-14-2006

none wrote:
> I have a slightly different question, especially geared to those who
> have MCSEs and CCNA. A little re-assurance or reality check would help,
> especially being in the "Show-Me" state of Missouri.
>
> I enrolled in the local Cisco Academy for this fall. I have 2 rather
> under utilized NT4.0 and Win2k MCSEs, an A+ and 3 MOS certifications.
> Currently, I work at a call center. I am hoping as I approach 40 this
> February, that the CCNA and possible CCNP will help me break out of my
> mold, and actually aid in making more money, especially to legitimate
> the vast amounts I have spent already. Yes, I was one of those folks who
> got involved in computer work in 1999 for the cash, until the bottom
> fell out. Now, I figure it's time to fully succeed with the Cisco stuff
> and subsequent job prospects, or come up with a new career plan. I
> don't feel great about this path, but my friends who have taken some of
> the classes urge me on, saying it should help vastly.
>
> Has anyone out there had under-utilized skills or certifications, but
> found that Cisco certifications improved their lot? Is it possible to
> actually find a job, preferably day-shift because Cisco really helped to
> increase skillset and marketability?
> Any feedback in this news group would be helpful and most appreciated.
>
> Thanks ,
> David


The first question you have to ask yourself is what level of support
are you currently doing? Are you doing password resets and how do I
make word justify to the right and not the left or center, or are you
doing some server administration and more advanced stuff. I am making a
dangerous assumption that no matter what it is you are not happy doing
it.

If the reason your asking is because you have been stuck in level 1
support hell for the last 7 years, and droning sounds of every end user
blaming you because they cant figure out how to right click then maybe
you need ask yourself what s the growth potential from within your
comapny. Even if you do get a CCNA what are the chances you will be
able to make it off the helpdesk or is it just time to change
companies? Knowledge is power and subsequently the only tool you will
have to ever get out of doing the same redundant simple tasks everyday.


I started in IT the same year you did. I made some extremely risky
moves after being laid off from verizon during my 2nd year of IT
experience and turned myself into an IT contractor for 3 years going
anywhere and doing anything. I also got my CCNA in June of 2000.

I thought the CCNA was my answer to getting off the help desk and felt
it would surely get me a networking job. My CCNA never got me a job
that was exclusively "networking ", but it did get me several jobs and
contracts that gave me more networking experience which eventually has
led me to where I am today with 2.5years experience as a Network
Administrator in both NT and 2000/2003 with Cisco routers and switches
and firewalls.

The CCNA and CCNP will open the doors and ears of hiring managers but
your own perseverance and dedication is the only way you will become a
network analyst/engineer, again making a dangerous assumption that is
what you want.

As far as a day job goes. My official schedule is 8am-5pm according to
my offer letter and department policy. However, that does not cover
nights I am on call or when the guy down the street on the backhoe cuts
through the fiber line that feeds our building and the pager goes off
at 8pm because all the satalite offices just got the boot from the
network.

Either way I wish you the best of luck and if you ask me would I do it
all over again. the answer is I would have not have changed a thing.

PS the only current and active certification I still have is my
Microsoft MCP and A+. I am going to retake the CCNA at the end of the
month and start the CCNP later this year not so I can become certified
but so i can do my job better which will subsequently, hopefully get me
more money.

Steve

 
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J
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      06-14-2006
none wrote:
> I have a slightly different question, especially geared to those who
> have MCSEs and CCNA. A little re-assurance or reality check would help,
> especially being in the "Show-Me" state of Missouri.
>
> I enrolled in the local Cisco Academy for this fall. I have 2 rather
> under utilized NT4.0 and Win2k MCSEs, an A+ and 3 MOS certifications.
> Currently, I work at a call center. I am hoping as I approach 40 this
> February, that the CCNA and possible CCNP will help me break out of my
> mold, and actually aid in making more money, especially to legitimate
> the vast amounts I have spent already. Yes, I was one of those folks who
> got involved in computer work in 1999 for the cash, until the bottom
> fell out. Now, I figure it's time to fully succeed with the Cisco stuff
> and subsequent job prospects, or come up with a new career plan. I
> don't feel great about this path, but my friends who have taken some of
> the classes urge me on, saying it should help vastly.
>
> Has anyone out there had under-utilized skills or certifications, but
> found that Cisco certifications improved their lot? Is it possible to
> actually find a job, preferably day-shift because Cisco really helped to
> increase skillset and marketability?
> Any feedback in this news group would be helpful and most appreciated.
>
> Thanks ,
> David


In addition to Steve's reply I would strongly recommend working your
way into the VoIP world. That is where it's at right now. We can't
hirer VoIP engineers fast enough. In the next 2-3 years IPTV is going
to explode as well. Getting on the bandwagon now will definitely
benefit you. However with both you need the underlying basics, and a
damn fine grasp of them at that. One thing you might leverage is your
Microsoft knowledge and how that will integrate with the Cisco VoIP
products. Unity is extemely dependant on Exchange. Everything ties
into Exchange and AD. Learning Cisco VoIP from that perspecitve may
serve you well. Personally I know that I'm behind on the voice side of
things. To that end I am going to take the opposite route. I am going
to focus all my attention away from voice and on my core R&S, security
and more importantly service provider skillsets. Then I'll pick up
voice. Given the account that I'm currently working on, I don't have
much of an opportunity to learn voice. However I have an opportunity
to hone my skills on everything else.

J

 
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none
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      06-15-2006
Thanks guys, I will try to press on, even despite my tenuous grasp on
subnetting. That grasp is a lot strong than my grasp on my credit card
paying for Cisco Academy and books, but I love write-offs!

Another good outcome of training is self-enforced celibacy. I'll be too
busy reading to have to even qualify for child support.

Again, thanks for your more seasoned perspective!

-David
 
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Newbie72
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      06-15-2006

none wrote:
> Thanks guys, I will try to press on, even despite my tenuous grasp on
> subnetting. That grasp is a lot strong than my grasp on my credit card
> paying for Cisco Academy and books, but I love write-offs!
>
> Another good outcome of training is self-enforced celibacy. I'll be too
> busy reading to have to even qualify for child support.
>
> Again, thanks for your more seasoned perspective!
>
> -David


If you are having a hard time with some network concepts then my
recomendation is to get your hands on material authored by Todd Lammle.
I have read hisbook which is published by Sybex and his videos which
can be obtained from keystone learning.

 
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