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This was likely to happen

 
 
Rich
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      06-01-2006
Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience. With pits smaller than bacteria, any
amount of dust on a disc could cause a momentary glitch in playback,
despite error correction mechanisms.

http://www.dvdtown.com/article/revie...1hd-dvdp/3255/

Also, I experienced a momentary video dropout during "Phantom of the
Opera." It lasted only a couple of seconds, corrected itself, and went
on. As I could not repeat it, I suspect a piece of dust was the
culprit. When I took the disc out and examined it, I saw no obvious
flaws, no scratches or fingerprints. Maybe the Toshiba A1's
error-correction mechanism is extra fussy about these things; or maybe
high-definition discs, with the laser having to read smaller data pits
than SD discs, are more susceptible to tiny dust and lint particles.
By extension of this latter logic, Blu-ray, with data pits even
smaller than HD-DVD, might be even more sensitive to dust. We'll have
to wait and see.
 
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Tarkus
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      06-01-2006
On 5/31/2006 6:08:55 PM, Rich wrote:

> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience.


At least in 1st Generation units that were rushed to market by mediocre
electronics manufacturers.

Early CD players had similar problems. I had one cheap, early generation
player that I literally had to clean every disc I played, every single
time, or it would skip badly.
--
"Name's Ash. Housewares."

Now playing: "[Buffer: 60%] Rainbow - Kill the King (last.fm)"
 
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Walter Traprock
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      06-01-2006
Rich <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience. With pits smaller than bacteria, any
> amount of dust on a disc could cause a momentary glitch in playback,
> despite error correction mechanisms.
>
> http://www.dvdtown.com/article/revie...1hd-dvdp/3255/
>
> Also, I experienced a momentary video dropout during "Phantom of the
> Opera." It lasted only a couple of seconds, corrected itself, and went
> on. As I could not repeat it, I suspect a piece of dust was the
> culprit. When I took the disc out and examined it, I saw no obvious
> flaws, no scratches or fingerprints. Maybe the Toshiba A1's
> error-correction mechanism is extra fussy about these things; or maybe
> high-definition discs, with the laser having to read smaller data pits
> than SD discs, are more susceptible to tiny dust and lint particles.
> By extension of this latter logic, Blu-ray, with data pits even
> smaller than HD-DVD, might be even more sensitive to dust. We'll have
> to wait and see.


That sucks. Also from the above link:

We come to the big question: How does the Toshiba HD-A1 perform? First,
the carps, just to get them out of the way. The thing takes what seems
like forever to load a disc. Upon initially turning it on, the machine
has to transfer some data and check some things, like, I'm told,
watermarks on an HD-DVD to see if it's a bootleg. The Toshiba owner's
manual informs us that "the HD-DVD player operates more like a computer
and differently than a standard DVD player. In addition to containing a
microprocessor, it contains an operating system, random access memory
(RAM), and an HD DVD drive." So expect it to be slow. I counted about
thirty seconds or more to load a disc and some lag time on clicking on
certain menu items.
 
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Aaron Lawrence
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      06-01-2006
On a pleasant day while strolling in alt.video.dvd, a person by the name
of Walter Traprock exclaimed:
> (RAM), and an HD DVD drive." So expect it to be slow. I counted about
> thirty seconds or more to load a disc and some lag time on clicking on
> certain menu items.


That will build upon the pleasure of mandatory copyright warnings, Dolby
advertisements, animated menus, studio logos, and disclaimers! I can
hardly wait! It will be like rewinding the VHS tape before playing it.


--
aaronl at consultant dot com
For every expert, there is an equal and
opposite expert. - Arthur C. Clarke
 
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Rich
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      06-02-2006
On Wed, 31 May 2006 18:38:39 -0700, Tarkus <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 5/31/2006 6:08:55 PM, Rich wrote:
>
>> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
>> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience.

>
>At least in 1st Generation units that were rushed to market by mediocre
>electronics manufacturers.
>
>Early CD players had similar problems. I had one cheap, early generation
>player that I literally had to clean every disc I played, every single
>time, or it would skip badly.


Yes, I'd agree. Toshiba's first DVD players were dogs too.
-Rich
 
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Rich
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      06-02-2006
On Thu, 01 Jun 2006 00:29:51 -0700, Walter Traprock
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Rich <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
>> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience. With pits smaller than bacteria, any
>> amount of dust on a disc could cause a momentary glitch in playback,
>> despite error correction mechanisms.
>>
>> http://www.dvdtown.com/article/revie...1hd-dvdp/3255/
>>
>> Also, I experienced a momentary video dropout during "Phantom of the
>> Opera." It lasted only a couple of seconds, corrected itself, and went
>> on. As I could not repeat it, I suspect a piece of dust was the
>> culprit. When I took the disc out and examined it, I saw no obvious
>> flaws, no scratches or fingerprints. Maybe the Toshiba A1's
>> error-correction mechanism is extra fussy about these things; or maybe
>> high-definition discs, with the laser having to read smaller data pits
>> than SD discs, are more susceptible to tiny dust and lint particles.
>> By extension of this latter logic, Blu-ray, with data pits even
>> smaller than HD-DVD, might be even more sensitive to dust. We'll have
>> to wait and see.

>
>That sucks. Also from the above link:
>
>We come to the big question: How does the Toshiba HD-A1 perform? First,
>the carps, just to get them out of the way. The thing takes what seems
>like forever to load a disc. Upon initially turning it on, the machine
>has to transfer some data and check some things, like, I'm told,
>watermarks on an HD-DVD to see if it's a bootleg. The Toshiba owner's
>manual informs us that "the HD-DVD player operates more like a computer
>and differently than a standard DVD player. In addition to containing a
>microprocessor, it contains an operating system, random access memory
>(RAM), and an HD DVD drive." So expect it to be slow. I counted about
>thirty seconds or more to load a disc and some lag time on clicking on
>certain menu items.


This is true. Accordiing to "The Enquirer" (a computer news website)
the video processors in these things are actual computer video cards,
Nvidia or something.
 
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unisellers
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      06-02-2006

Rich wrote:
> On Wed, 31 May 2006 18:38:39 -0700, Tarkus <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >On 5/31/2006 6:08:55 PM, Rich wrote:
> >
> >> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
> >> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience.

> >
> >At least in 1st Generation units that were rushed to market by mediocre
> >electronics manufacturers.
> >
> >Early CD players had similar problems. I had one cheap, early generation
> >player that I literally had to clean every disc I played, every single
> >time, or it would skip badly.

>
> Yes, I'd agree. Toshiba's first DVD players were dogs too.
> -Rich


My first two DVD players were eratic and short lived. $250.00 and $300+
down the toilet. I now have a $59.00 APEX that has been humming along
for years with no problems.

----------
Buy Sell - Lists - Lots - Collections
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/InventoryLists/

 
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Rich
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      06-03-2006
On 1 Jun 2006 21:22:07 -0700, "unisellers" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>
>Rich wrote:
>> On Wed, 31 May 2006 18:38:39 -0700, Tarkus <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>> >On 5/31/2006 6:08:55 PM, Rich wrote:
>> >
>> >> Dust and any thing else that constitutes "dirt" will be the bane of
>> >> the Blu-Ray, HD-DVD experience.
>> >
>> >At least in 1st Generation units that were rushed to market by mediocre
>> >electronics manufacturers.
>> >
>> >Early CD players had similar problems. I had one cheap, early generation
>> >player that I literally had to clean every disc I played, every single
>> >time, or it would skip badly.

>>
>> Yes, I'd agree. Toshiba's first DVD players were dogs too.
>> -Rich

>
>My first two DVD players were eratic and short lived. $250.00 and $300+
>down the toilet. I now have a $59.00 APEX that has been humming along
>for years with no problems.
>
>----------
>Buy Sell - Lists - Lots - Collections
>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/InventoryLists/


My first DVD player was a $1600 work of art, Sony's S7000. Best
audio/video purchase I ever made. It ran for 7 years and finally
needed to be re-calibrated.
 
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