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Wicked Cool Java

 
 
Luke Webber
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      05-24-2006
Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:
> Luke Webber wrote:
>> What RS232 problem? The JavaComm API does RS232 and serial comms.

>
> E.g. that JavaComm was not maintained for years.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm for Windows was recently withdrawn by Sun.


Ah, OK. I didn't realise that. I've used JavaComm in the past with some
success, but that was a few years back.

> E.g. that JavaComm never made it into the standard edition.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm is difficult to deploy via WebStart.


I should hope so. I wouldn't want you deploying DLLs to my system via
the web.

> E.g. that JavaComm does not provide access to more esoteric tty options.
>
> These problems.


Fair enough. That's why I asked. Thanks for enlightening me.

Luke
 
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Luke Webber
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      05-24-2006
jmcgill wrote:
> Luke Webber wrote:
>> What RS232 problem? The JavaComm API does RS232 and serial comms. But
>> it's /not/ cool. I did RS232 comms programming for more years than I
>> care to recall, and "cool" lasted maybe a week. These days especially,
>> there is nothing the least bit cool about it.

>
> I wrote serial drivers twelve to fourteen years ago, and today, I
> honestly cannot tell you how I did it. I'm totally serious, I was doing
> things in C and x86 asm that I literally do not know how to do today.
> Some of the systems I worked on were pretty cool, but definitely not the
> code or the process of writing it.


Heh. My first foray into serial comms was on a CP/M box in 1981,
starting in assembly language, but switching to Pascal. Then later in a
bizarre virtual assembler for the Pick O/S and some BASIC, then later in
x86 assembler for the IBM PC under DOS, then later in C for the same
platform, then later in C under Winblows and then later in Pascal under
Winblows. Too much to forget.

> I don't remember anything about it,
> and except when something reminds me (like this message thread), I
> actually forget I had that job altogether.


I still recall fumbling around to learn just what the hell you could do
in a PC hardware interrupt routine. Not a lot, as it turned out. <g>

Luke
 
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Chris Uppal
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      05-25-2006
Luke Webber wrote:

> I should hope so. I wouldn't want you deploying DLLs to my system via
> the web.


You can, though. I assume that it isn't possible to install /system/ DLLs via
WebStart, but you can certainly install application-local ones.

-- chris


 
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Oliver Wong
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      05-25-2006
"TechBookReport" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> Some of the reviews on the site are signed, it's up to the reviewer
> whether they want to put their name to a review or not.


Out of curiosity, why would a reviewer NOT want to put their name on
their reviews?

- Oliver

 
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Dale King
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      05-25-2006
Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:
> Luke Webber wrote:
>> What RS232 problem? The JavaComm API does RS232 and serial comms.

>
> E.g. that JavaComm was not maintained for years.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm for Windows was recently withdrawn by Sun.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm never made it into the standard edition.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm is difficult to deploy via WebStart.
>
> E.g. that JavaComm does not provide access to more esoteric tty options.
>
> These problems.


A couple more you forgot:

- Sun never made a JavaComm for Linux or Mac

- JavaComm was written to rely on a completely unnecessary properties
file that was found using stupid, undocumented, and obscure means
instead of using the more logical service provider abstraction
(<http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/guide/jar/jar.html#Service%20Provider>).

I have told people for years to forget about JavaComm and use the open
source RXTX library which solves many of these problems
(http://www.rxtx.org).

--
Dale King
 
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Dale King
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      05-25-2006
Luke Webber wrote:
> Thomas Weidenfeller wrote:
>> Luke Webber wrote:
>> E.g. that JavaComm is difficult to deploy via WebStart.

>
> I should hope so. I wouldn't want you deploying DLLs to my system via
> the web.


That's too narrow a perspective. In my case I had a monitoring device
for development that I created that talked serially to the PC. I wanted
to deploy the PC application for users of the device within the company
using WebStart and found it was quite a pain.

For more information about JavaComm and WebStart see:
- http://lopica.sourceforge.net/faq.html#comm
--
Dale King
 
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Chris Uppal
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      05-25-2006
Oliver Wong wrote:

> Out of curiosity, why would a reviewer NOT want to put their name on
> their reviews?


To avoid reprisals ?

To preserve a "handle" by which s/he was already well-known in other contexts ?

To maintain a fixed identity, independent of [future] changes in his/her
professional or private life ?

Because "he" is actually a group of people ?

Because "they" are actually all the same person ?

And that's without getting into questionable or dishonest motivations...

-- chris


 
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Oliver Wong
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      05-25-2006

"Chris Uppal" <(E-Mail Removed)-THIS.org> wrote in message
news:4475f548$0$645$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Oliver Wong wrote:
>
>> Out of curiosity, why would a reviewer NOT want to put their name on
>> their reviews?

>
> To avoid reprisals ?
>
> To preserve a "handle" by which s/he was already well-known in other
> contexts ?
>
> To maintain a fixed identity, independent of [future] changes in his/her
> professional or private life ?
>
> Because "he" is actually a group of people ?
>
> Because "they" are actually all the same person ?


Right, sorry, I by "their name", I meant "a name". I'm familiar with the
practice of authors using pen-names which vary depending on the genre or
target audience they're writing for. You'd use one name for horror novels,
and another for romantic comedies, for example, so as not to have your
romantic-comedy fans stumble upon your horror novels and vice versa. I
suppose some sort of parallel could be drawn for reviews.

But my understanding is that some of the reviews on the site mentioned
upthreaded have no reviewer-name at all. The "avoid reprisals" seems to be
the only reason applicable for this context, but do reviewers really have to
fear reprisal? Unless you were giving a poor review for a product released
by the company you worked for, I really imagine getting into much trouble
unless the text you're submitting isn't so much a review, but more of a
whistleblowing for a dangerous, malfunctioning product, for example.

As Rhino said, the review is less convincing if the reviewer isn't
willing to stand by and defend his/her judgement.

- Oliver

 
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Chris Smith
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      05-25-2006
Oliver Wong <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> But my understanding is that some of the reviews on the site mentioned
> upthreaded have no reviewer-name at all. The "avoid reprisals" seems to be
> the only reason applicable for this context, but do reviewers really have to
> fear reprisal?


The Mafia's gotta do something to survive! Who says they don't have
book publishers among their clientele?

(Seriously, I agree with you.)

--
www.designacourse.com
The Easiest Way To Train Anyone... Anywhere.

Chris Smith - Lead Software Developer/Technical Trainer
MindIQ Corporation
 
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steve
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      05-25-2006
On Wed, 24 May 2006 14:08:51 +0800, jmcgill wrote
(in article <yKScg.5824$_c1.5247@fed1read05>):

> Luke Webber wrote:
>> What RS232 problem? The JavaComm API does RS232 and serial comms. But
>> it's /not/ cool. I did RS232 comms programming for more years than I
>> care to recall, and "cool" lasted maybe a week. These days especially,
>> there is nothing the least bit cool about it.

>
> I wrote serial drivers twelve to fourteen years ago, and today, I
> honestly cannot tell you how I did it. I'm totally serious, I was doing
> things in C and x86 asm that I literally do not know how to do today.
> Some of the systems I worked on were pretty cool, but definitely not the
> code or the process of writing it. I don't remember anything about it,
> and except when something reminds me (like this message thread), I
> actually forget I had that job altogether.


we ve all done this , long before C was ever invented. serial & parallel
printer drivers, computer to computer links before ethernet , more than 25
years ago.

Unfortunately i still have the code stuck in my head.

But my point remains that , "wicked cool java" is obviously a morons
Guide.
These kids , will never understand the true meaning of pain , or what is
actually required in real business environments.
(scanners/printers/cash draws /production line control/shipping/Quality
assurance and such like)

Hence RS232 & USB

Steve


 
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