Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > DVD Video > S video cable

Reply
Thread Tools

S video cable

 
 
Mark Jones
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-27-2005
WinField wrote:
> Gold - 14
> Copper - 10.4
> Silver - 9.8
>
> Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.
> Copper & Silver connects would have LESS of your precious contact
> resistance.


The problem with your position is that this is only true if the copper
and silver conductors are sealed against contact with the air. Both
of these metals are very prone to the development of a film of corrosion
that drastically reduces their conductivity. Gold is very resistant to
corrosion and will quickly have a better conductivity than either
silver or copper when they are all exposed to the air.

I have seen this based on actual experience and not by just quoting
some numbers out of a text book without being able to understand
how to use these numbers.

Care to try again?


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mark Jones
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-27-2005
WinField wrote:
> I opened up one of my old school books [Grob|Third Edition "Basic
> Electronics"]
> - and found table 9*3 (p.212) Properties of Conducting Materials,
> specific resistance(s) @20C, CMIL.Ohm/ft (that's circular mils)
>
> (lower is better, except maybe for Mark's Community College)
>
> Gold - 14
> Copper - 10.4
> Silver - 9.8
>
> Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.
> Copper & Silver connects would have LESS of your precious contact
> resistance.

My old textbook has a slight variation from these numbers,
but they are still close. Gold isn't chosen because it has the
best conductivity, but rather because its reactivity is very low.

Silver can't be used in its pure form because it tarnishes so
easily when exposed to the air. Copper suffers from the same
problem, only it is much slower to develop tarnish on its
surface. Gold can be exposed to the air for thousands of
years and still shine like the day it was first mined.

That is why gold is used in critical applications, not because
it has the lowest resistance. You can design a circuit using
gold contacts and be certain that contact resistance will
remain consistent over the life of the product. I have seen
silver/tin alloys develop corrosion after just a few months of
severe use outside, while the same contacts remain shiny
as new when they are changed over to gold plating. When
you are going to be a few hundred miles out in the boonies,
you want to know that your equipment is going to work
when everything is connected. Gold contacts reduce the
rate at which problems occur. This is not based on guessing,
but is the result of years of actual observations.

When I buy cables for my HDTV to DVD player connection,
I want a good connection that will remain that way for years
to come without corrosion or tarnish being an issue. If
this is not important to you, then by all means buy some
cheap cables,


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
TokaMundo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-27-2005
On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 10:10:02 -0700, WinField <(E-Mail Removed)>
Gave us:

>
>Mark Jones wrote:
>> WinField wrote:
>>
>>>Mark Jones wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>I might consider your opinion worthwhile if you can show that you
>>>>have similar experience in the electronics industry.
>>>
>>> You are a Jehovah's Witness for gold connects. I've learned that
>>>it's a waste of my time to argue religion with folks like you.
>>>

>>
>> You can't provide anything to counter what I have learned based
>> on many years of experience. This is based on factual information
>> and real world results, not some "religious" belief.
>>
>> You lose.

>
>Depends on who's judging the debate, Mark.


Just the fax, Maam...

>
>Your mention of your education/degree brought back some old memories for
>me. I seemed to recall that I had learned that *GOLD* did not have the
>lowest intrinsic resistance ...


Exactly. It does have better corrosion properties, which is the
ONLY argument for using it. The RCA connector design is such that a
good drag scrape occurs on the center pin with each insertion. So any
good metal works even after some minor oxidation.
>
>I opened up one of my old school books [Grob|Third Edition "Basic
>Electronics"]
> - and found table 9*3 (p.212) Properties of Conducting Materials,
> specific resistance(s) @20C, CMIL.Ohm/ft (that's circular mils)
>
>(lower is better, except maybe for Mark's Community College)
>
>Gold - 14
>Copper - 10.4
>Silver - 9.8
>
>Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.


Heheheh... I have a GRIP on reality, I do not think I have any
GRIPES with reality. I have always known the tiers of metal
conductivities. Strange, I even knew it as a kid.

> Copper
>& Silver connects would have LESS of your precious contact resistance.


Silver plate is best. In fact, aside from silver being the best pure
element for electrical conduction, its oxide, in pure form is so far
the best conductor of all.

Nickel cadmium was the de facto plating for decades, but California
and others claimed that cadmium is a bad thing. It is, in pure form
and in many compounds.

Funny that since the compound/alloy mentioned (platings) doesn't
pose a cadmium safety/health issue.
>
>Got that, baby-cakes?
> Winf
>


 
Reply With Quote
 
TokaMundo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-27-2005
On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 18:38:31 GMT, "Mark Jones"
<(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:

>WinField wrote:
>> Gold - 14
>> Copper - 10.4
>> Silver - 9.8
>>
>> Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.
>> Copper & Silver connects would have LESS of your precious contact
>> resistance.

>
>The problem with your position is that this is only true if the copper
>and silver conductors are sealed against contact with the air.


Not true.

> Both
>of these metals are very prone to the development of a film of corrosion
>that drastically reduces their conductivity.


It isn't a film. It is called oxidation, and it takes place on the
surface, and is no way in the form of a film.

> Gold is very resistant to
>corrosion and will quickly have a better conductivity than either
>silver or copper when they are all exposed to the air.


Not true. While copper oxide is a poor conductor, one rarely sees
it used for connectors used in low power analog signal passes.
One would see copper used in high power, high current, large lug
connectors that explicitly scrape their pins as the connectors halves
mate.

Also, silver oxide is actually a better conductor than silver
itself.

>
>I have seen this based on actual experience and not by just quoting
>some numbers out of a text book without being able to understand
>how to use these numbers.


There is a lot you assume. One is that WinField doesn't understand
the electrical and chemical properties of metals and alloys.

>
>Care to try again?
>

The facts are the facts. You'll get used to shoe leather soon, if
you continue to embrace foot in mouth practices.

The only thing you have said that is correct is that gold is used
for reasons that center around oxidation and the fact that it oxidizes
very slowly and at a very thin surface depth.

The actual best contact plating material is platinum, as it oxidizes
even less than gold, and carries better physical properties that
increase its longevity in this application. It is cost prohibitive,
however.
 
Reply With Quote
 
TokaMundo
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-27-2005
On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 19:33:29 GMT, "Mark Jones"
<(E-Mail Removed)> Gave us:

>WinField wrote:
>> I opened up one of my old school books [Grob|Third Edition "Basic
>> Electronics"]
>> - and found table 9*3 (p.212) Properties of Conducting Materials,
>> specific resistance(s) @20C, CMIL.Ohm/ft (that's circular mils)
>>
>> (lower is better, except maybe for Mark's Community College)
>>
>> Gold - 14
>> Copper - 10.4
>> Silver - 9.8
>>
>> Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.
>> Copper & Silver connects would have LESS of your precious contact
>> resistance.

>My old textbook has a slight variation from these numbers,
>but they are still close. Gold isn't chosen because it has the
>best conductivity, but rather because its reactivity is very low.
>
>Silver can't be used in its pure form because it tarnishes so
>easily when exposed to the air.


Silver IS used in its pure form, for electrical contacts ALL THE
TIME. Its surface oxides do NOT pose an electrical issue.


> Copper suffers from the same
>problem, only it is much slower to develop tarnish on its
>surface.


Copper oxidizes faster than silver, and its oxides are poorer
conductors than the base strata.

> Gold can be exposed to the air for thousands of
>years and still shine like the day it was first mined.


Bullshit. Platinum can handle air exposure for about a hundred
years before noticeable converted atoms can be found on its surface.
Gold oxidizes faster than platinum, so it would fall inside that
window.

>
>That is why gold is used in critical applications, not because
>it has the lowest resistance. You can design a circuit using
>gold contacts and be certain that contact resistance will
>remain consistent over the life of the product.


You managed another correct observation.

> I have seen
>silver/tin alloys develop corrosion after just a few months of
>severe use outside, while the same contacts remain shiny
>as new when they are changed over to gold plating. When
>you are going to be a few hundred miles out in the boonies,
>you want to know that your equipment is going to work
>when everything is connected.


If you are doing outside, weathered connections, you should be
applying an anti-oxidant paste or grease to all of your pins and
sockets during the installation. Done correctly, silver and copper
(though copper is not used in the industry) would last just fine.

The only place one finds bare copper in low power signalling is the
center conductor of CATV coax. It is a copper plated steel wire.

It too requires an anti-oxidant application during connection. All
one has to do is follow the proper techniques discovered over the
decades for low power, low voltage signal connections.

> Gold contacts reduce the
>rate at which problems occur. This is not based on guessing,
>but is the result of years of actual observations.


Knowing the whys and wherefors does one better than watching and
guessing ever will.

>When I buy cables for my HDTV to DVD player connection,
>I want a good connection that will remain that way for years
>to come without corrosion or tarnish being an issue.


The TV and the player needs them as well. In fact, they are what
usually ages.

> If
>this is not important to you, then by all means buy some
>cheap cables,
>

"cheap" cables work fine if applied correctly.
 
Reply With Quote
 
WinField
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-28-2005

TokaMundo wrote:
> On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 10:10:02 -0700, WinField <(E-Mail Removed)>
> Gave us:


>>>WinField wrote:

{snip}
>>Wipe the egg off your face, if/when you get a gripe on reality.

>
>
> Heheheh... I have a GRIP on reality, I do not think I have any
> GRIPES with reality. I have always known the tiers of metal
> conductivities. Strange, I even knew it as a kid.


I do sometimes gripe about reality - LOL. ack, those typos

You're knowledge far exceeds mine on metals, oxides and conductivity
TokaMundo. I am impressed.

Winfield
 
Reply With Quote
 
Bill Binder
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-28-2005
Well, everyone's entitled to their opinions, but I've always experienced
better picture quality on Sony. But there are so many variables, that I
hope the original poster should realize that everyone's posts on such
subjects are opinions.

S-Video does technically transfer the video in a more precise way than
the yellow-white-red composite cables. But if they look the same to you,
than do whatever you like best.

Pursue your own bliss, don't let others tell you how to acheive it.

Bill
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Should I use yellow video cable when using S-video? somebody DVD Video 2 01-08-2006 06:02 AM
Looking for SATA power cable to IDE power cable adapter Jack B. Pollack Computer Support 3 02-12-2004 08:50 PM



Advertisments