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High Definition

 
 
Richard C.
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      03-18-2005
--
X-No-archive: yes

"jayembee" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:d1b6gf$8p4$(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Biz" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>> At least one of my local fm radio stations says that their radio station
>>> "is now broadcasing in high-definition" on their radio frequency.
>>>
>>> So what I need to know now is
>>>
>>> Does anyone know where I can buy a high-definition radio?
>>>
>>> and how much do they cost?

>>
>> Call letters of the station please?

>
> He probably doesn't remember, but dollars to donuts he has a
> recording of it on cassette tape somewhere...
>
> -- jayembee
>

==============================
The HORRIBLE thing, is that dvdputz is correct for the first time.
Several Seattle stations are broadcasting in "high definition" also:

http://www.king.org/hdradio/
http://www.ibiquity.com/hdradio/
http://www.simplebits.com/notebook/2...0/hdradio.html
http://www.wfuv.org/wfuv/digitalradio.html

I think his being correct, however, is just an accident.
=============================



 
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Jeff Rife
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      04-01-2005
Richard C. ((E-Mail Removed)) wrote in alt.video.digital-tv:
> The HORRIBLE thing, is that dvdputz is correct for the first time.
> Several Seattle stations are broadcasting in "high definition" also:
>
> http://www.king.org/hdradio/


When the broadcaster doesn't know what is going on with current technology,
it doesn't bode well for new technology. A snippet from that page:

================================================== ===============
What does it mean that 98.1 KING FM is broadcasting in HD Radio=3F Technology?

For those with digital receivers, the noise and interference that cause the
static, hiss, pops, and fades heard on today's analog radios will be
virtually eliminated.
================================================== ===============

There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

--
Jeff Rife | "The Babylon Project was our last, best hope
| for peace.... It failed."
|
| -- Commander Susan Ivanova, 2260

 
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Bill Turner
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      04-02-2005
On 1 Apr 2005 00:25:22 GMT, Jeff Rife <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
>of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

__________________________________________________ _________

That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
signal.

The same is true for a digital signal. If the noise is strong enough and
persistent enough, the signal will be lost. Digital does have one
advantage over analog however: Error correction is possible. With
analog, you either get it the first time or not at all.

--
BT


 
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Jeff Rife
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      04-02-2005
Bill Turner ((E-Mail Removed)) wrote in alt.video.digital-tv:
> On 1 Apr 2005 00:25:22 GMT, Jeff Rife <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
> >of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

> __________________________________________________ _________
>
> That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
> noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
> signal.


No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

--
Jeff Rife | "One minute we were spanking each other with
| meat, and the next minute it got weird."
|
| -- Joe Hackett, "Wings"

 
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Bill Turner
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      04-04-2005
On 2 Apr 2005 23:56:43 GMT, Jeff Rife <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
>at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
>the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

__________________________________________________ _________

Nonsense. You obviously don't listen to weak FM signals which can be
heard, but with noise. Ham radio operators using FM do it all the time.

My disagreement here is with your original statement "There is no
static, hiss, or pops on FM radio." That statement is too broad to be
correct. There are lots of exceptions.

--
BT


 
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Roderick Stewart
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      04-04-2005
In article <d2nbfr$813$(E-Mail Removed)>, Jeff Rife wrote:
> > >There is no static, hiss, or pops on FM radio. Fading (which includes loss
> > >of stereo) is the only artifact of a reduced-quality FM signal.

> > __________________________________________________ _________
> >
> > That statement is true only if the signal to noise ratio is high. If the
> > noise is strong enough, you will hear it even without fading of the FM
> > signal.

>
> No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
> at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
> the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.


True. If the signal fades, eventually you'll lose reception of *any* type of
radio transmission. AM, FM and digital simply die different deaths, viz-

AM - programme volume decreases and gradually disappears into noise.
FM - noise increases and gradually overwhelms programme.
Digital - nothing noticeable at all at first, then screetches and yelps and
suddenly disappears altogether.

Rod.


 
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Stephen Neal
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      04-08-2005

"Bill Turner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:d2qi6o$94l$(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 2 Apr 2005 23:56:43 GMT, Jeff Rife <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>No, if the signal to noise ratio is that low, there *is* no usable signal
>>at all, and what you hear is the amplification of "nothing"...basically
>>the same thing you hear when you tune to a spot where no station exists.

> __________________________________________________ _________
>
> Nonsense. You obviously don't listen to weak FM signals which can be
> heard, but with noise. Ham radio operators using FM do it all the time.
>
> My disagreement here is with your original statement "There is no
> static, hiss, or pops on FM radio." That statement is too broad to be
> correct. There are lots of exceptions.
>


Yes - especially if by "FM radio" you include the standard broadcast stereo
imlementation - where the stereo difference signal gets progressively
noisier, meaning many radios include a force MONO button, as the stereo sum
(i.e. mono audio) "lasts longer" - and clear mono may be preferable to poor
stereo?

I realise this is because the difference signal is carried using additional
modulation techniques, but when talking about "FM" radio as a consumer
product, most people mean FM VHF stereo as broadcast, rather than a purely
FM modulation technique?

Steve



 
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