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Movie companies get with digital revolution?

 
 
Robin
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      01-11-2005
When will the movie companies finally get wise and remember
the old axiom "give the customer what they want and they
will buy?"

It's movie night and you have several friends over. You
gotta decide what to watch so you

a. Have all of your friends walk over to you DVD shelf and
browse your collection.

b. Leave everyone sitting on the couch eating popcorn, as
you browse your collection onscreen.

The technology has been in place for years, and now that you
have PC's that are capable of HD video out to your TV, and
digital audio to your HT (or a nice set of Klipsch 5.1 PC
speakers that put $1,000 HT's to shame); why not store our
movies on our PC's? Why not sell DVD quality digital files
that we can legally store on our PC's? I for one would
probably pay a few extra dollars a movie just for the
convenience of not having to rip my DVD's to my hard drive,
and then convert them into a file type that can be easily
transmitted over my home network. Whatever happened to the
concept of "fair use" and being able to use my property in
the manner that is most convenient for me?


 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      01-11-2005
>When will the movie companies finally get wise and remember
>the old axiom "give the customer what they want and they
>will buy?"


When the industry "themselves" feel confident that the technology won't give
customers what they feel is the capability to devalue their product.

Of course, current anti-piracy measures only serve to negatively affect the end
user and are usually easily circumvented by pirates. But, the suits in the
industry don't think that way.

>The technology has been in place for years, and now that you
>have PC's that are capable of HD video out to your TV, and
>digital audio to your HT (or a nice set of Klipsch 5.1 PC
>speakers that put $1,000 HT's to shame); why not store our
>movies on our PC's?


Why?

I don't want my computer to be the heart of my home theatre rig. It's kind of
like broadband telephones: if you lose your broadband connection then your
phone system goes out. If your HT computer crashes, no movies!

I'd rather have a system that isn't so closely tied as to be dependent on a
single component which is prone to outside attacks through the broadband or
phoneline connection. Of course, hackers and viruses may not be as much of a
problem on a PowerMac as it would be on a Windows machine, but any computer can
fail due to hardware failure such as a hard drive crash.

Besides, as good as a great sound setup on a computer is, that still won't
compare to something like my STR-DA4ES or someone else's pre-amp/outboard amp
setup like a Lexicon/Krell pairing with Magnepans. (I'm sure someone has such
a setup here, although it may not be exact.)

Also, I still want to play my CDs, cassettes, and LPs through my system if I
want to listen to music and not movie soundtracks. It's kind of hard to do
that with a computer setup while also trying to minimize RF interaction with
the sound, especially from a turntable as the output from the pickup has to be
preamplified to line level before it can be used, which makes the output before
the preamp vulnerable to interference from the computer. Also, a computer
CD-ROM drive, even with the D/A conversion handled by the sound card or a
multimedia application, may still fall short of a decent dedicated CD player
for just playing redbook audio, like my CDP-X229ES.

>Why not sell DVD quality digital files
>that we can legally store on our PC's?


What if your computer crashes? Granted, there are solutions to back up your
system in case of a failure, but why go through the additional trouble of
backing up several gigs of movies in addition to the rest of the hard disk? -
Reinhart


 
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Robin
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      01-12-2005

"LASERandDVDfan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >When will the movie companies finally get wise and

remember
> >the old axiom "give the customer what they want and they
> >will buy?"

>
> When the industry "themselves" feel confident that the

technology won't give
> customers what they feel is the capability to devalue

their product.
>


That's never going to happen. There will always be reverse
engineerng and pirates. They are just screwing themselves
out of income, while trying to prevent the inevitable.

> Of course, current anti-piracy measures only serve to

negatively affect the end
> user and are usually easily circumvented by pirates. But,

the suits in the
> industry don't think that way.
>
> >The technology has been in place for years, and now that

you
> >have PC's that are capable of HD video out to your TV,

and
> >digital audio to your HT (or a nice set of Klipsch 5.1 PC
> >speakers that put $1,000 HT's to shame); why not store

our
> >movies on our PC's?

>
> Why?
>


Because it is very convenient. When it comes to browsing
your movie collection, there is nothing better than sitting
on your couch and using your remote to do it.


> I don't want my computer to be the heart of my home

theatre rig. It's kind of
> like broadband telephones: if you lose your broadband

connection then your
> phone system goes out. If your HT computer crashes, no

movies!
>
> I'd rather have a system that isn't so closely tied as to

be dependent on a
> single component which is prone to outside attacks through

the broadband or
> phoneline connection. Of course, hackers and viruses may

not be as much of a
> problem on a PowerMac as it would be on a Windows machine,

but any computer can
> fail due to hardware failure such as a hard drive crash.
>


If someone was that paranoid about viruses, they could keep
their media PC off of the net. Also, any decent external
hard drive comes with software to automatically back up your
new files.


> Besides, as good as a great sound setup on a computer is,

that still won't
> compare to something like my STR-DA4ES or someone else's

pre-amp/outboard amp
> setup like a Lexicon/Krell pairing with Magnepans. (I'm

sure someone has such
> a setup here, although it may not be exact.)
>


Maybe not, but for my small home theater, a Klipsch 5.1 PC
speaker sounds fantastic. I'm sure I'm not the only
consumer who would agree.


> Also, I still want to play my CDs, cassettes, and LPs

through my system if I
> want to listen to music and not movie soundtracks. It's

kind of hard to do
> that with a computer setup while also trying to minimize

RF interaction with
> the sound, especially from a turntable as the output from

the pickup has to be
> preamplified to line level before it can be used, which

makes the output before
> the preamp vulnerable to interference from the computer.

Also, a computer
> CD-ROM drive, even with the D/A conversion handled by the

sound card or a
> multimedia application, may still fall short of a decent

dedicated CD player
> for just playing redbook audio, like my CDP-X229ES.
>


That's your preference. I'd like to be able to use my PC.


> >Why not sell DVD quality digital files
> >that we can legally store on our PC's?

>
> What if your computer crashes? Granted, there are

solutions to back up your
> system in case of a failure, but why go through the

additional trouble of
> backing up several gigs of movies in addition to the rest

of the hard disk? -
> Reinhart
>


Because my preference is different from yours. Not better
or worse. If the movie companies want to boost their
profits, they need to learn to make both of us happy.



 
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LASERandDVDfan
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Posts: n/a
 
      02-03-2005
>> When the industry "themselves" feel confident that the
>technology won't give
>> customers what they feel is the capability to devalue

>their product.
>>

>
>That's never going to happen. There will always be reverse
>engineerng and pirates. They are just screwing themselves
>out of income, while trying to prevent the inevitable.


Of course, that's never going to happen. I'm just saying that's what the suits
want.

Wanting it to happen, and actually happening are two different things.

>Because it is very convenient. When it comes to browsing
>your movie collection, there is nothing better than sitting
>on your couch and using your remote to do it.


Sometimes, the convenience factor comes with a price. Namely, drawbacks.

>If someone was that paranoid about viruses, they could keep
>their media PC off of the net. Also, any decent external
>hard drive comes with software to automatically back up your
>new files.


Then you'd have to go through the trouble of connecting it back up to download
new movies.

Plus, backing up large files takes a long time and you must have storage
capability that can support the amount of data you have onboard. (And, if I
were going to go the backup route, I'd try a RAID 1 with an external drive as
extra insurance.)

>Maybe not, but for my small home theater, a Klipsch 5.1 PC
>speaker sounds fantastic. I'm sure I'm not the only
>consumer who would agree.


Well for this case, as you've said before, that's preferences.

>That's your preference. I'd like to be able to use my PC.


There are many more uses for a PC than merely entertainment.

I use mine for leisure, I admit, but I also use it for work, some of it RAM and
processor intensive.

>Because my preference is different from yours. Not better
>or worse. If the movie companies want to boost their
>profits, they need to learn to make both of us happy.


True.

Although, here's the reasoning for my preference.

In IT, there's a saying that you should never rely on your computer for too
many things as it will let you down sooner or later. That's the reason why
good maintenance, "common sense" use practices (like not downloading files
offered for free from a questionable source), and backup contingencies are
important (but largely ignored by the general computing public). Computers can
fail for a variety of reasons, many preventable but also from a good number of
causes that can be out of your control.

A regular home theatre setup, while less convenient than an HT-PC, is more
reliable because it is, by operation, nowhere near as complex or dependent on a
variety of so many factors to work. - Reinhart
 
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