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HD-DVD growth will be much slower than DVD's was

 
 
RichA
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-10-2004
For obvious reasons, you have to buy
and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
was released. It's even possible HD
whatever of the two (three?) standards
eventually wins will be a short-lived
one anyway, replaced by something else,
more suited to both the computer and
movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
"laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
words, a small selling niche product.
The only way this won't happen will be
if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
in price for reasonable sized models.
-Rich
 
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Doc_Johnson
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      12-10-2004
On Thu, 09 Dec 2004 20:25:03 -0500, RichA <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>For obvious reasons, you have to buy
>and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
>was released.

snipped....................
>-Rich


You might want to set your line length to 80 characters or so, this 40 is quite
annoying!

Agent or Free Agent News reader:
Options/Posting preferences/Line length.

Doc
 
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Mike Kohary
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-10-2004
RichA wrote:
> For obvious reasons, you have to buy
> and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
> was released. It's even possible HD
> whatever of the two (three?) standards
> eventually wins will be a short-lived
> one anyway, replaced by something else,
> more suited to both the computer and
> movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
> "laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
> words, a small selling niche product.
> The only way this won't happen will be
> if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
> in price for reasonable sized models.


That's exactly how I see it. It seems doomed to be a niche format at best.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
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3W
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-10-2004
"RichA" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> The only way this won't happen will be
> if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000


Has already happened.

40 inch:
http://salestores1.com/zer440hdprtv.html

46 inch (if you want refurbished):
http://store.yahoo.com/refurbelectro...thhdte-rb.html

Or 46 inch new:
http://www.ubid.com/actn/opn/getpage...ionId=10175462

Hell, you can even get a brand new 51 inch:
http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=2601133


Enough said.


 
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Biz
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-10-2004

"Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:cpb30f$3jd$(E-Mail Removed)...
> RichA wrote:
> > For obvious reasons, you have to buy
> > and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
> > was released. It's even possible HD
> > whatever of the two (three?) standards
> > eventually wins will be a short-lived
> > one anyway, replaced by something else,
> > more suited to both the computer and
> > movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
> > "laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
> > words, a small selling niche product.
> > The only way this won't happen will be
> > if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
> > in price for reasonable sized models.

>
> That's exactly how I see it. It seems doomed to be a niche format at

best.
>


It seems awfully silly to doom a new format to niche b4 its even available
commercially.


 
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Mike Kohary
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-10-2004
Biz wrote:
> "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:cpb30f$3jd$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> RichA wrote:
>>> For obvious reasons, you have to buy
>>> and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
>>> was released. It's even possible HD
>>> whatever of the two (three?) standards
>>> eventually wins will be a short-lived
>>> one anyway, replaced by something else,
>>> more suited to both the computer and
>>> movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
>>> "laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
>>> words, a small selling niche product.
>>> The only way this won't happen will be
>>> if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
>>> in price for reasonable sized models.

>>
>> That's exactly how I see it. It seems doomed to be a niche format
>> at best.

>
> It seems awfully silly to doom a new format to niche b4 its even
> available commercially.


I don't really see how any HD-DVD format can quickly penetrate the
mainstream US market. HD-capable TVs hardly exist in the average American
household, and the difference between DVD and HD-DVD is simply not as stark
and obvious as the numerous advantages that DVD held over VHS. There's
going to be a format war that will confuse consumers and add to indecision
even by knowledgable customers (like myself - I won't buy until one format
wins out). It will require expensive new hardware, only a few short years
after the initial introduction of the previous format, and that hardware
will only be useful on the aforementioned HD-capable TV sets that hardly
anyone owns. The parallels between HD-DVD and Laserdisc are glaringly
obvious. Where is the incentive for mainstream acceptance of this new
format?

It's just a prognostication, but I think it's a reasonably educated guess
amply backed up by the above reasoning. How would you back up your
statement, or if you think I'm wrong and that HD-DVD will see fairly rapid
mainstream acceptance, what makes you think so?

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


 
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poldy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-11-2004
In article <cpbaqi$ip8$(E-Mail Removed)>, "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

> HD-capable TVs hardly exist in the average American
> household


It's about 13 million or 13% of US households. 10 million more expected
by the end of 2005.

Over 60 million by 2008.

That's a fair number of households, wouldn't you say?
 
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RnR Lesnar
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-11-2004
Look how cheap DVD hardware is now compared to when it debuted. HDTV's are
already coming down in price. I got my 42 inch sony rear projection LCD for
under $2000. Plus, many more channels will begin broadcasting in HD in the
next couple of years.


--
RnR Lesnar
It's True, It's True- Kurt Angle
Bush/Cheney 2004


"Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:cpbaqi$ip8$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Biz wrote:
>> "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:cpb30f$3jd$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> RichA wrote:
>>>> For obvious reasons, you have to buy
>>>> and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
>>>> was released. It's even possible HD
>>>> whatever of the two (three?) standards
>>>> eventually wins will be a short-lived
>>>> one anyway, replaced by something else,
>>>> more suited to both the computer and
>>>> movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
>>>> "laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
>>>> words, a small selling niche product.
>>>> The only way this won't happen will be
>>>> if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
>>>> in price for reasonable sized models.
>>>
>>> That's exactly how I see it. It seems doomed to be a niche format
>>> at best.

>>
>> It seems awfully silly to doom a new format to niche b4 its even
>> available commercially.

>
> I don't really see how any HD-DVD format can quickly penetrate the
> mainstream US market. HD-capable TVs hardly exist in the average American
> household, and the difference between DVD and HD-DVD is simply not as
> stark and obvious as the numerous advantages that DVD held over VHS.
> There's going to be a format war that will confuse consumers and add to
> indecision even by knowledgable customers (like myself - I won't buy until
> one format wins out). It will require expensive new hardware, only a few
> short years after the initial introduction of the previous format, and
> that hardware will only be useful on the aforementioned HD-capable TV sets
> that hardly anyone owns. The parallels between HD-DVD and Laserdisc are
> glaringly obvious. Where is the incentive for mainstream acceptance of
> this new format?
>
> It's just a prognostication, but I think it's a reasonably educated guess
> amply backed up by the above reasoning. How would you back up your
> statement, or if you think I'm wrong and that HD-DVD will see fairly rapid
> mainstream acceptance, what makes you think so?
>
> --
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com
>
> Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
> Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>



 
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luminos
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-12-2004

"poldy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <cpbaqi$ip8$(E-Mail Removed)>, "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> HD-capable TVs hardly exist in the average American
>> household

>
> It's about 13 million or 13% of US households. 10 million more expected


Documentation?


 
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GMAN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-12-2004
In article <cpbaqi$ip8$(E-Mail Removed)>, "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Biz wrote:
>> "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:cpb30f$3jd$(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> RichA wrote:
>>>> For obvious reasons, you have to buy
>>>> and HD compatible TV, unlike when DVD
>>>> was released. It's even possible HD
>>>> whatever of the two (three?) standards
>>>> eventually wins will be a short-lived
>>>> one anyway, replaced by something else,
>>>> more suited to both the computer and
>>>> movie industry. HD-DVD could be the
>>>> "laserdisc" of the 2000s, in other
>>>> words, a small selling niche product.
>>>> The only way this won't happen will be
>>>> if HD compatible TVs drop below $1000
>>>> in price for reasonable sized models.
>>>
>>> That's exactly how I see it. It seems doomed to be a niche format
>>> at best.

>>
>> It seems awfully silly to doom a new format to niche b4 its even
>> available commercially.

>
>I don't really see how any HD-DVD format can quickly penetrate the
>mainstream US market. HD-capable TVs hardly exist in the average American
>household, and the difference between DVD and HD-DVD is simply not as stark
>and obvious as the numerous advantages that DVD held over VHS. There's
>going to be a format war that will confuse consumers and add to indecision
>even by knowledgable customers (like myself - I won't buy until one format
>wins out). It will require expensive new hardware, only a few short years
>after the initial introduction of the previous format, and that hardware
>will only be useful on the aforementioned HD-capable TV sets that hardly
>anyone owns. The parallels between HD-DVD and Laserdisc are glaringly
>obvious. Where is the incentive for mainstream acceptance of this new
>format?
>
>It's just a prognostication, but I think it's a reasonably educated guess
>amply backed up by the above reasoning. How would you back up your
>statement, or if you think I'm wrong and that HD-DVD will see fairly rapid
>mainstream acceptance, what makes you think so?
>

What ****es me off is that it is "Always" Sony that is right smack dab in the
middle of all this format war bullshit with every new technology. Its their
way or Fu$k all compatibility. I wish there was a standards group that had
some teeth
 
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