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Self-Destructing DVD: Picture of Disc & Package.

 
 
One-Shot Scot
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      11-13-2004
A DVD of the Christmas-themed movie "Noel" carries warnings that the
movie must be used immediately after opening, because it has been
recorded on a "disposable" disc, in this product shot made Thursday,
Nov. 11, 2004.

Disposable DVDs look and play like normal DVDs, except that their
playable surface is dark red. Each disc contains a chemical time-bomb
that begins ticking once it's exposed to air. Typically, after 48 hours,
the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
no longer can read it.

The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services. After the
movie is watched, the consumer tosses it into the trash, eliminating
late fees and the cost of return mail but creating a potentially large
new source of trash.

http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081


 
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Jon Purkey
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      11-13-2004
On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 05:33:38 -0800, "One-Shot Scot" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081


From the article:

"(Discs can live as little as one hour or as long as 60 hours.)"

So that means the DVD could self-destruct before the movie has even
finished? I suppose then you would have to buy a second one to see the
rest of the movie?

I'd probably copy it immediately to my computer and then watch it as
often as I wanted. Or just spend the extra $$ for the regular DVD. Or
watch it on the Moon...


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LASERandDVDfan
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      11-14-2004
>Typically, after 48 hours,
>the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
>no longer can read it.


One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.

Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc deteriorates, but
also how different players will handle a disc that is decaying. Not all DVD
players are made equal and some may quit working with the disc several hours
before the intended expiration.

>The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
>stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.


My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay releases only
to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films. This is where rental
outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. - Reinhart
 
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Richard C.
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      11-14-2004
X-No-archive: yes

"One-Shot Scot" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081
>

=============================

And just what happens if it "destructs" while it is in the player and
playing?


 
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Invid Fan
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      11-14-2004
In article <4197aec7$0$31260$(E-Mail Removed)> , Richard
C. <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> X-No-archive: yes
>
> "One-Shot Scot" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/wireStory?id=249081
> >

> =============================
>
> And just what happens if it "destructs" while it is in the player and
> playing?
>

You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
unless they paused it for awhile.

--
Chris Mack "Refugee, total ****. That's how I've always seen us.
'Invid Fan' Not a help, you'll admit, to agreement between us."
-'Deal/No Deal', CHESS
 
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Del March
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      11-14-2004
<< You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
unless they paused it for awhile. >><BR><BR>
It would be cool if the decay didn't start until the disk was exposed to a
laser, thus guaranteeing at least one complete viewing.
 
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Pug Fugley
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      11-15-2004

"Del March" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> << You're out of luck. In a perfect world, they'd be able to control the
> decay somewhat and have it happen progressivly. For example, if it took
> two hours for a dvd to be deleted, starting with the first tracks,
> anyone who is able to start watching a film would be able to finish it
> unless they paused it for awhile. >><BR><BR>
> It would be cool if the decay didn't start until the disk was exposed to a
> laser, thus guaranteeing at least one complete viewing.


....or one good copy, allowing unlimited viewing at any time


 
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One-Shot Scot
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      11-15-2004
"LASERandDVDfan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>Typically, after 48 hours,
>the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
>no longer can read it.


<<One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.>>

<<Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc
deteriorates, but also how different players will handle a disc that is
decaying. Not all DVD players are made equal and some may quit working
with the disc several hours before the intended expiration.>>

>The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
>stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.


<<My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay
releases only to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films.
This is where rental outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. -
Reinhart>>


Apparently, the disk turns from a translucent red to an impenetrable
black. During the final hours of disk decay, a player might be able to
read parts of the disk and not others. And of course, some players will
be able to compensate for the missing information better than others.

My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of exclusive
titles --- such as _Noel.


 
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Mike Kohary
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      11-15-2004
One-Shot Scot wrote:
>
> My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of
> exclusive titles --- such as _Noel.


It's notable that this film is actually a current theatrical release, and
the release on Flexplay is concurrent. In 6 months time, I think we can
assume this title will see a regular, conventional DVD release.

--
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Mike Kohary mike at kohary dot com http://www.kohary.com

Karma Photography: http://www.karmaphotography.com
Seahawks Historical Database: http://www.kohary.com/seahawks
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grant kinsley
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      11-15-2004
On Sun, 14 Nov 2004 16:53:40 -0800, "One-Shot Scot" <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>"LASERandDVDfan" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>Typically, after 48 hours,
>>the disc turns darker, becoming so opaque that a DVD player's laser can
>>no longer can read it.

>
><<One concern could be that the 48 hour window is an approximation.>>
>
><<Actual time to failure will vary not only with how the disc
>deteriorates, but also how different players will handle a disc that is
>decaying. Not all DVD players are made equal and some may quit working
>with the disc several hours before the intended expiration.>>
>
>>The technology's backers see it as an alternative for video rental
>>stores and Netflix-type mail-based subscription services.

>
><<My concern about this point is that it ends up limiting Flexplay
>releases only to mainstream hits, ignoring other interesting films.
>This is where rental outlets and Netflix has an edge over Flexplay. -
>Reinhart>>
>
>
>Apparently, the disk turns from a translucent red to an impenetrable
>black. During the final hours of disk decay, a player might be able to
>read parts of the disk and not others. And of course, some players will
>be able to compensate for the missing information better than others.
>
>My concern about this format is that it will consist mainly of exclusive
>titles --- such as _Noel.


I suspect, actually, that Noel will become available later as a
regular DVD. The problem is that Noel was not picked up by a
distributor in N.America, therefore the Flexplay discs are the
equivalent of it's theatrical release. to be followed down the road by
a regular DVD release.

Personally I think it's silly, but that seems to be the logic.

G
>


 
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