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DVD to VHS

 
 
Andrew Jones
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      05-21-2004
Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
well?
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Andrew Jones
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To email me, take 'spluc.' out of my address.
Please visit http://worldrallyradio.tk

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TCS
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      05-21-2004
On Fri, 21 May 2004 23:17:02 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Jones <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
>some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
>this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
>well?


DVD players usually don't have an RF connection and macrovision will still
screw up a VHS recording made from RF.

The two ways to get around macrovision are:
hack a player; some players can be modified. Solder a wire to the right
places and macrovision will go away. Don't even think of trying it if you
aren't experienced. Most DVD players have traces at 40 lines/inch.

insert a macrovision remover such as sima's color corector.
 
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Impmon
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      05-22-2004
On Fri, 21 May 2004 23:17:02 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Jones
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
>some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
>this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
>well?


It doesn't matter what you connect with, you'll still get lousy
picture. What you need is Macrovision defeater and it can be in the
form of firmware upgrade for your DVD player or an external device
that connects between the DVD p[layer and VCR and removes the
Macrovision code.

Also any VCR before 1990 would work as it doesn't have the AGC that
Macrovision uses to mess up the video signal.
--
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Maureen Goldman
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      05-22-2004
>Andrew Jones <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
>some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
>this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
>well?


My RCA VCR records DVDs just fine when I've made backups. Before
seeking a solution, I'd suggest you find out if you have a problem.

 
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Oldus Fartus
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      05-22-2004
Maureen Goldman wrote:

>>Andrew Jones <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
>>some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
>>this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
>>well?

>
>
> My RCA VCR records DVDs just fine when I've made backups. Before
> seeking a solution, I'd suggest you find out if you have a problem.
>


Whilst I agree with your suggestion, in your particular case it could
either be your DVD player OR your VCR which is the cause for your
recordings being fine.

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Oldus Fartus

 
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Oldus Fartus
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      05-22-2004
Andrew Jones wrote:

> Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
> some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
> this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
> well?



Generally speaking all commercial DVDs are protected using macrovision
to deter copying to tape. To simplify it's workings greatly it works
by using the differing specifications between a TV and a VCR AGC
(automatic gain control). AGC in a TV responds quite slowly to change,
whereas that in a VCR responds quickly. If pulses are added to the
blanking interval between frames a TV AGC does not have time to react,
and the pulses are ignored. In a VCR however, the faster acting AGC
does react, and you end up with an unviewable recording.

Many of the video enhancing and stabilisers available will clean the
signal by removing any noise etc, and one of the pleasant side effects
is that it will also often remove the macrovision pulses.

In other cases people have had success by connecting their VCR to the AV
out connector on their TV so wiring becomes DVD player to AV-in on TV.
TV AV-out to AV-in on VCR.

I have to say I couldn't be bothered because VHS is so clearly inferior
in quality to DVD.

--
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Oldus Fartus

 
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Andrew Jones
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      05-23-2004
Thanks everyone, so I suppose I have no real choice other than to get a
Macrovision defeater. Where could I get one, and how much do they cost?

Well, that's unless an old VCR I do have doesn't have AGC...
--
Andrew Jones
http://www.trustphotosite.com/andy29
To email me, take 'spluc.' out of my address.
Please visit http://worldrallyradio.tk

"It's a pocket shepherd. It costs just fifty nine pounds, a small price
to pay for the gift of a functioning body that works properly"
 
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Maureen Goldman
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      05-23-2004
>Andrew Jones <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Thanks everyone, so I suppose I have no real choice other than to get a
>Macrovision defeater. Where could I get one, and how much do they cost?
>
>Well, that's unless an old VCR I do have doesn't have AGC...


Doesn't necessarily have to be an old VCR. Future Shop in Canada has
customer remarks about the items they're selling (all new). One
customer mentions that his new RCA VCR doesn't flag macrovision.

 
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GMAN
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      05-24-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Impmon <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>On Fri, 21 May 2004 23:17:02 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Jones
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>Hello, I have been looking at archives of this newsgroup and I see that
>>some DVDs can be copy protected, so they make awful VHS copies. But does
>>this happen only through a scart cable, or with the aerial connection as
>>well?

>
>It doesn't matter what you connect with, you'll still get lousy
>picture. What you need is Macrovision defeater and it can be in the
>form of firmware upgrade for your DVD player or an external device
>that connects between the DVD p[layer and VCR and removes the
>Macrovision code.
>
>Also any VCR before 1990 would work as it doesn't have the AGC that
>Macrovision uses to mess up the video signal.

That above statement is SO far from fact that its not even funny. You shouldnt
make a blamket statement that ALL pre 1990 vcr's have the ability to ignore
macrovision. ALL vcr's have AGC circuitry, its just that SOME old ones didn't
react to the injected signal in the VBI

 
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