Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > DVD Video > How long to burn 100 GB onto DVD?

Reply
Thread Tools

How long to burn 100 GB onto DVD?

 
 
Mike Kohary
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
> Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 05:26:06 -0700]:
> > "Martin S." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >> In the computer world 1GB is 1024MB, in the DVD world 1GB is 1000MB....

> >
> > You sure about that? That's like saying in the algebra world, 2+2=4,

but in
> > the geometry world, 2+2=4.5.
> >
> > 8 bits = 1 byte. 1024 bytes = 1 megabyte. 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte.
> > Those numbers are mathematically derived, not arbitrarily chosen. Is

the
> > number pi also different on DVD?

>
> In the Hard Drive world, 1000 bytes = 1 megabyte, why would DVDs be
> different?


That's incorrect, Justin.

Mike


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mike Kohary
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
> TCS wrote on [Fri, 09 Apr 2004 09:30:10 -0500]:
> > On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:14:57 GMT, Justin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 05:26:06 -0700]:
> >>> "Martin S." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>>> In the computer world 1GB is 1024MB, in the DVD world 1GB is

1000MB....
> >>>
> >>> You sure about that? That's like saying in the algebra world, 2+2=4,

but in
> >>> the geometry world, 2+2=4.5.
> >>>
> >>> 8 bits = 1 byte. 1024 bytes = 1 megabyte. 1024 megabytes = 1

gigabyte.
> >>> Those numbers are mathematically derived, not arbitrarily chosen. Is

the
> >>> number pi also different on DVD?

> >
> >>In the Hard Drive world, 1000 bytes = 1 megabyte, why would DVDs be
> >>different?

> >
> > In the HD world, 1 megabyte=1000000 bytes

>
> doh. Yeah. Too little coffee this morning.


You guys are both stoned, but you're right that I did skip a step - doh! It
should be:

8 bits = 1 byte
1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (that's the part I skipped)
1024 kilobytes = 1 megabyte
1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte

That applies to computer memory, floppy disks, hard drives, CD, what have
you. I'm not aware that DVDs are exempt from this decades-long accepted
convention. Do you have references otherwise?

Mike


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Mike Kohary
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"timothynadeau" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:c564p1$ua0$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > "Martin S." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > In the computer world 1GB is 1024MB, in the DVD world 1GB is

1000MB....
> >
> > You sure about that? That's like saying in the algebra world, 2+2=4,

but
> in
> > the geometry world, 2+2=4.5.
> >
> > 8 bits = 1 byte. 1024 bytes = 1 megabyte. 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte.
> > Those numbers are mathematically derived, not arbitrarily chosen. Is

the
> > number pi also different on DVD?

>
> http://pcguide.com/intro/fun/bindec.htm


Thanks for the link. I have to admit I'm shocked that decimal measures have
apparently entered the lexicon, which I frankly think is stupid. Binary
measures are well established and should continue to be used exclusively. I
really don't care that it causes confusion among the mainstream. The link
doesn't address DVD in particular - does it indeed use a decimal measure?

Mike


 
Reply With Quote
 
Justin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 09:51:07 -0700]:
> "Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
>> TCS wrote on [Fri, 09 Apr 2004 09:30:10 -0500]:
>> > On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:14:57 GMT, Justin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> >>Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 05:26:06 -0700]:
>> >>> "Martin S." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> >>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>> >>>> In the computer world 1GB is 1024MB, in the DVD world 1GB is

> 1000MB....
>> >>>
>> >>> You sure about that? That's like saying in the algebra world, 2+2=4,

> but in
>> >>> the geometry world, 2+2=4.5.
>> >>>
>> >>> 8 bits = 1 byte. 1024 bytes = 1 megabyte. 1024 megabytes = 1

> gigabyte.
>> >>> Those numbers are mathematically derived, not arbitrarily chosen. Is

> the
>> >>> number pi also different on DVD?
>> >
>> >>In the Hard Drive world, 1000 bytes = 1 megabyte, why would DVDs be
>> >>different?
>> >
>> > In the HD world, 1 megabyte=1000000 bytes

>>
>> doh. Yeah. Too little coffee this morning.

>
> You guys are both stoned, but you're right that I did skip a step - doh! It
> should be:


But it isn't

> 8 bits = 1 byte
> 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (that's the part I skipped)
> 1024 kilobytes = 1 megabyte
> 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte
>
> That applies to computer memory, floppy disks, hard drives, CD, what have
> you. I'm not aware that DVDs are exempt from this decades-long accepted
> convention. Do you have references otherwise?


Hasn't applied to Hard Drives for at least 5 years
 
Reply With Quote
 
TCS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 17:07:37 GMT, Justin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 09:51:07 -0700]:
>> "Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
>>> TCS wrote on [Fri, 09 Apr 2004 09:30:10 -0500]:
>>> > On Fri, 09 Apr 2004 14:14:57 GMT, Justin <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> >>Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 05:26:06 -0700]:
>>> >>> "Martin S." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>>> >>> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>> >>>> In the computer world 1GB is 1024MB, in the DVD world 1GB is

>> 1000MB....
>>> >>>
>>> >>> You sure about that? That's like saying in the algebra world, 2+2=4,

>> but in
>>> >>> the geometry world, 2+2=4.5.
>>> >>>
>>> >>> 8 bits = 1 byte. 1024 bytes = 1 megabyte. 1024 megabytes = 1

>> gigabyte.
>>> >>> Those numbers are mathematically derived, not arbitrarily chosen. Is

>> the
>>> >>> number pi also different on DVD?
>>> >
>>> >>In the Hard Drive world, 1000 bytes = 1 megabyte, why would DVDs be
>>> >>different?
>>> >
>>> > In the HD world, 1 megabyte=1000000 bytes
>>>
>>> doh. Yeah. Too little coffee this morning.

>>
>> You guys are both stoned, but you're right that I did skip a step - doh! It
>> should be:


>But it isn't


>> 8 bits = 1 byte
>> 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (that's the part I skipped)
>> 1024 kilobytes = 1 megabyte
>> 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte
>>
>> That applies to computer memory, floppy disks, hard drives, CD, what have
>> you. I'm not aware that DVDs are exempt from this decades-long accepted
>> convention. Do you have references otherwise?


>Hasn't applied to Hard Drives for at least 5 years


It's never applied to hard drives. Only programmers trying to save the
effort of doing a binary->decimal conversion used kilo=1024, etc.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Kohary
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"TCS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> >> 8 bits = 1 byte
> >> 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (that's the part I skipped)
> >> 1024 kilobytes = 1 megabyte
> >> 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte
> >>
> >> That applies to computer memory, floppy disks, hard drives, CD, what

have
> >> you. I'm not aware that DVDs are exempt from this decades-long

accepted
> >> convention. Do you have references otherwise?

>
> >Hasn't applied to Hard Drives for at least 5 years

>
> It's never applied to hard drives. Only programmers trying to save the
> effort of doing a binary->decimal conversion used kilo=1024, etc.


It has always and still applies to hard drives. Put a 40GB hard drive in
your system and tell me how much storage it actually gives you.

It actually applies to everything computer related. If that's changing,
it's because it's *changing*; i.e. what applies is being altered from what I
state above, which is historically correct.

Mike


 
Reply With Quote
 
Justin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 12:23:05 -0700]:
> "TCS" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>> >> 8 bits = 1 byte
>> >> 1024 bytes = 1 kilobyte (that's the part I skipped)
>> >> 1024 kilobytes = 1 megabyte
>> >> 1024 megabytes = 1 gigabyte
>> >>
>> >> That applies to computer memory, floppy disks, hard drives, CD, what

> have
>> >> you. I'm not aware that DVDs are exempt from this decades-long

> accepted
>> >> convention. Do you have references otherwise?

>>
>> >Hasn't applied to Hard Drives for at least 5 years

>>
>> It's never applied to hard drives. Only programmers trying to save the
>> effort of doing a binary->decimal conversion used kilo=1024, etc.

>
> It has always and still applies to hard drives. Put a 40GB hard drive in
> your system and tell me how much storage it actually gives you.


And how much does tha hard drive manufacturer claim it is?

See?

> It actually applies to everything computer related. If that's changing,
> it's because it's *changing*; i.e. what applies is being altered from what I
> state above, which is historically correct.


Hard Drives have been marketed this way for years.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Mike Kohary
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
> >
> > It has always and still applies to hard drives. Put a 40GB hard drive

in
> > your system and tell me how much storage it actually gives you.

>
> And how much does tha hard drive manufacturer claim it is?
>
> See?
>
> > It actually applies to everything computer related. If that's changing,
> > it's because it's *changing*; i.e. what applies is being altered from

what I
> > state above, which is historically correct.

>
> Hard Drives have been marketed this way for years.


Oh, I see, you're talking about marketing. I'm talking about reality.

Marketing <> reality.

Mike


 
Reply With Quote
 
Justin
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
Mike Kohary wrote on [Fri, 9 Apr 2004 14:24:43 -0700]:
> "Justin" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)2go.com...
>> >
>> > It has always and still applies to hard drives. Put a 40GB hard drive

> in
>> > your system and tell me how much storage it actually gives you.

>>
>> And how much does tha hard drive manufacturer claim it is?
>>
>> See?
>>
>> > It actually applies to everything computer related. If that's changing,
>> > it's because it's *changing*; i.e. what applies is being altered from

> what I
>> > state above, which is historically correct.

>>
>> Hard Drives have been marketed this way for years.

>
> Oh, I see, you're talking about marketing. I'm talking about reality.
>
> Marketing <> reality.
>
> Mike


If that were the case then lawsuits over false advertising, claiming a
250GB HD only had 230 or so GB space.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark Jones
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      04-09-2004
"Mike Kohary" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:c56k1s$6ct$(E-Mail Removed)...
> You are correct. They are slightly different when applied to binary
> language for reasons of binary structure. Since there are no prefixes

that
> mean "1024", these prefixes are considered "close enough". This is a
> well-established and accepted convention. Though I suppose it could be

true
> and I just haven't heard about it, I highly doubt that DVDs (which are
> simply another digital storage medium and store the same bits and bytes as
> any other disk) are exempt from this nomenclature. Feel free to either
> prove me wrong with a reference, or let me know that I took the hook.


It would appear that the manufacturers are hyping things to make
it look like we are going to get more than we really receive.

The formatted capacity of my 250 GB hard drive is just slightly
less than 250 billion bytes, or 232 GB. I wish that they would
just be honest regarding the actual capacity of storage media
instead of playing games with the numbers. Even if the
unformatted capacity is 250 GB, that is a meaningless number
because it can't be used unless you format the drive.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Re: How include a large array? Edward A. Falk C Programming 1 04-04-2013 08:07 PM
Tetration (print 100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100^100) jononanon@googlemail.com C Programming 5 04-25-2012 08:49 PM
Having compilation error: no match for call to (const __gnu_cxx::hash<long long int>) (const long long int&) veryhotsausage C++ 1 07-04-2008 05:41 PM
Photo quality - onto paper or onto CD? Theseeker Digital Photography 8 10-04-2004 08:59 PM
Easy way to burn 30gb of files onto DVD JesterDev Computer Support 6 05-24-2004 05:42 PM



Advertisments