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Re: Anybody else think DVD's are still Over Priced?

 
 
Justin
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      02-24-2004
LASERandDVDfan wrote on [24 Feb 2004 03:34:15 GMT]:
>>And why did you fix the popcorn, was it broken?

>
> You know exactly what he means, yes?


I could figure it out, yes.


> It was a figure of speech which suggests the preparation of popcorn.
>
> You've ever heard of the term "I'm going to fix me up something to eat?" -


No
 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>Not at all. I got to the movies for two people for 11.50
>


Of course, the cost of ticket prices varies depending on locations.

If you live in small cities, the admission is going to be lower.

If you live in a metropolis (like NYC, LA, or Miami), you will pay through the
wazoo on admission.

In Titusville, FL., the average admission price is around $7.50 at the United
Artists Searstown 10. (crappy)

In Oveido, FL. the average admission price is $8.50 at the Oveido Marketplace
Regal Cinemas.

In Orlando, FL. the average admission price is around $8.50 at the Downtown
Disney AMC or the Loews Cineplex Universal Boardwalk.

The admission prices are for evening admission during the weekend (which is
also when most people are actually able to attend a screening).

In addition, you must factor the price of resources that must be used to get to
the theatre. The further away the theatre, the more fuel you have to use or
the higher fare you may have to pay for transportation to get there. -
Reinhart
 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>> You've ever heard of the term "I'm going to fix me up something to eat?" -
>
>No
>


You're kidding! Either that, or you don't use the word in that particular
context (which deserves commendation, IMO). - Reinhart
 
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Justin
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      02-24-2004
LASERandDVDfan wrote on [24 Feb 2004 04:05:50 GMT]:
>>> You've ever heard of the term "I'm going to fix me up something to eat?" -

>>
>>No
>>

>
> You're kidding! Either that, or you don't use the word in that particular
> context (which deserves commendation, IMO). - Reinhart


The term is probably used in areas around here, it sounds pretty uh....
middle American, but since I'm not an American it's nothing I've used or
paid attention to being used.

 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>Now look at album(cd) prices. They've steadily gone up from when records
>ran only a few bucks to now running about $14 to $18+ for a cd which is
>actually cheaper to mass produce than a vinyl record. And you can't
>tell me *any* artist has ran up 100 million or more to record an album.


The higher list price allows almost 50% pure profit to the record companies.
The rest is divided to pay for production, distribution, and marketing. The
artists really only see a paltry percentage (although it all adds up when
hoards of people buy these overpriced CDs).

The motion picture industry and the music industry are both different in their
ways, and yet they have one common viewpoint.

They are the same in that they treat the customer like the enemy, but still
manage to make their money. - Reinhart
 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>The term is probably used in areas around here, it sounds pretty uh....
>middle American


Pretty much.

> but since I'm not an American it's nothing I've used or
>paid attention to being used.


It's probably a figure of speech that is not used where you live. Much like
how we Americans call dispensing chemists "pharmacists." Or, how the English
call french fries "chips."

True English and "Americanized" English are basically the same yet distinctly
different in how various words have different meanings and even spellings. -
Reinhart
 
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Justin
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      02-24-2004
LASERandDVDfan wrote on [24 Feb 2004 04:15:41 GMT]:
>>Now look at album(cd) prices. They've steadily gone up from when records
>>ran only a few bucks to now running about $14 to $18+ for a cd which is
>>actually cheaper to mass produce than a vinyl record. And you can't
>>tell me *any* artist has ran up 100 million or more to record an album.

>
> The higher list price allows almost 50% pure profit to the record companies.
> The rest is divided to pay for production, distribution, and marketing. The
> artists really only see a paltry percentage (although it all adds up when
> hoards of people buy these overpriced CDs).
>
> The motion picture industry and the music industry are both different in their
> ways, and yet they have one common viewpoint.
>
> They are the same in that they treat the customer like the enemy, but still
> manage to make their money. - Reinhart


Of course, people aren't thought of as people by many groups.

The govt thinks of the citizenry as Taxpayers. Business sees them as
consumers. Media sees them as ratings.
 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>> Because for some people that's part of the movie-watching experience.
>
>Then they should count what they eat and drink at home when watching a DVD
>in the price of a DVD


For the initial viewing, this would apply. But what about subsequent viewings
with snacks?

The price for a DVD is a one-time admission price for unlimited viewings.
Taken into that context, a DVD ends up being a better value in the end. -
Reinhart
 
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LASERandDVDfan
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      02-24-2004
>Of course, people aren't thought of as people by many groups.
>
>The govt thinks of the citizenry as Taxpayers. Business sees them as
>consumers. Media sees them as ratings.


... or demographics.

Regardless of how it's viewed, it all adds up to one thing: the people,
whatever they are called, provide the money in exchange for goods and services.


In the case of broadcast, higher ratings means the better likelihood that
sponsors will pay for your airtime so they can advertise their products to the
viewers.

In the case of governments, the money is provided to help pay for operating. -
Reinhart
 
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Justin
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      02-24-2004
LASERandDVDfan wrote on [24 Feb 2004 04:23:29 GMT]:
>>> Because for some people that's part of the movie-watching experience.

>>
>>Then they should count what they eat and drink at home when watching a DVD
>>in the price of a DVD

>
> For the initial viewing, this would apply. But what about subsequent viewings
> with snacks?
>
> The price for a DVD is a one-time admission price for unlimited viewings.
> Taken into that context, a DVD ends up being a better value in the end. -


Of course, that assumes that a DVD is rewatchable.
 
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