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Re: Throwaway DVD Question

 
 
Scot Gardner
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003
"Charles Tomaras" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...

<<Quite frankly I don't understand what all the fuss is over it. These
companies should be able to market their products in any fashion they
see fit. If you don't like there are many other alternatives. I see this
as giving us more choice and not hampering us in any way.>>


There are no alternatives to a throwaway DVD if it is an exclusive
title that is not available as a normal DVD. Throwaway DVD will give you
less choice, not more. The first throwaway disk came from Circuit City,
which introduced the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format. Some of the
DIVX titles were exclusive to the DIVX format and not available as
Region 1 DVDs.

To give you an idea of just how destructive exclusive DIVX titles were,
below is a list of 140 Region 1 titles that DIVX held captive when it
went out of business, after 11 months, in 1999.

The appearance of an exclusive DIVX title on this list does not
necessarily mean that a Region 1 version would have been released if
DIVX had never existed. However, when the title in question has an open
DVD version in another region, it seems likely that DIVX is to blame for
the omission of a Region 1 version. Here is a nearly complete list of
what were originally exclusive DIVX titles:

8 Heads In A Duffel Bag
12 Angry Men
48 Hours
54
6th Man, The
Air Bud: Golden Receiver
Albino Alligator
Alice in Wonderland
Another 48 Hours
Apartment, The
Baby Boom
Bachelor Party
Bad Girls
Barton Fink
Before and After
Best Men
Best of the Best: Without Warning
Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure
Blackjack
Bridge At Remagen
Brothers McMullen, The
Brubaker
Bullets Over Broadway
Buffalo '66
Cadillac Man
Chain Reaction
Children of the Revolution
Cocoon
Commitments, The
Cool, Dry Place, A
Courage Under Fire
Crucible, The
Dead Man
Deceiver
Desperately Seeking Susan
Dirty Work
Distinguished Gentleman, The
Dumbo
Dunston Checks In
Dying Young
Ed Wood
Edward Scissorhands
End of Violence, The
Everyone Says I Love You
Evidence Of Blood
Father Of The Bride Part II
FernGully: The Last Rainforest
First Kid
Fled
Fly, The
French Kiss
From Dusk Till Dawn 2
Gang Related
Gone Fishin'
Great White Hype
Guadalcanal Diary
High Art
Hot Shots!
House Of Yes
Houseguest
I Love You Don't Touch Me!
I'm Gonna Git You Sucka
It Came From Outer Space
Jack
Jackie Brown
Jumpin' Jack Flash
Jungle 2 Jungle
Kiss Or Kill
Krippendorf's Tribe
Last Dance
Last of the Mohicans, The
Lenny
Life Less Ordinary, A
Little City
Locusts, The
Longest Day, The
Love and Death on Long Island
Madness Of King George
Marked for Death
Marnie
Married To The Mob
Miami Rhapsody
Mighty Quinn
Misfits, The
Mo' Better Blues
Monument Ave.
Mrs. Doubtfire
Mulholland Falls
My Cousin Vinny
Next Stop Wonderland
Night and the Moment, The
Nightwatch
Nixon
Office Killer
One Fine Day
Operation Condor 2: The
Paperback Romance
Picture Perfect
Planet of the Apes
Point Break
Preacher's Wife, The
Price Above Rubies, A
Prophecy II, The
Pure Luck
Rage, The
Raising Arizona
Rapid Fire
Retroactive
Rocketman
Romy and Michelle's High School Reunion
Senseless Shall We Dance?
She's So Lovely
Since You've Been Gone
Six Degrees Of Separation
Sleeping With the Enemy
Soldier's Daughter Never Cries, A
Some Like It Hot
Spaceballs
Stargate SG-1
Stealing Beauty
Sudden Death
Summer Fling
That Thing You Do!
This World, Then The Fireworks
Three Musketeers, The
Throw Momma From The Train
Topaz
Truce, The
Truth About Cats and Dogs, The
Turner & Hooch
TwentyFourSeven
Two For The Road
Ulee's Gold
Up Close & Personal
Verdict, The
Walk In The Clouds, A
Walking And Talking
Wall Street
War Of The Roses, The
Washington Square
Welcome To Sarajevo
Who Framed Roger Rabbit
Wide Awake
Working Girl
World Of Henry Orient, The
Young Frankenstien


 
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Charles Tomaras
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003

"Scot Gardner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:20030901113746.844$(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Charles Tomaras" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> <<Quite frankly I don't understand what all the fuss is over it. These
> companies should be able to market their products in any fashion they
> see fit. If you don't like there are many other alternatives. I see this
> as giving us more choice and not hampering us in any way.>>
>
>
> There are no alternatives to a throwaway DVD if it is an exclusive
> title that is not available as a normal DVD. Throwaway DVD will give you
> less choice, not more. The first throwaway disk came from Circuit City,
> which introduced the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format. Some of the
> DIVX titles were exclusive to the DIVX format and not available as
> Region 1 DVDs.



Where have you seen mention that these discs will be exclusive? Where have you
seen mention that they will supplant full non-degrading DVD's? I really think
the market will take care of itself just as it did with DIVX and I don't think
this is an apples to apples comparison with DIVX anyway, which was a coalition
of hardware, software and retailer.

You also have to acknowledge that DIVX came to market at a time when DVD was new
and the motion picture companies were withholding titles for a variety of
reasons as they watched to see what would happen. The DVD market today is
extremely profitable and I doubt that the motion picture companies are really
betting that people will buy a disposable DVD more than one time. I think the
secondary market for used DVD's is a drop in the bucket compared to new sales
and I doubt that is their motivation either. This really just gives them a whole
new marketing approach for rental priced DVD's because they can enlist numerous
new outlets which have neither the wish nor the ability to deal with the
logistics of rentals and returns.


 
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Scot Gardner
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003
"Charles Tomaras" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...

<<Where have you seen mention that these (throwaway) discs will be
exclusive? Where have you seen mention that they will supplant full
non-degrading DVD's?>>

So far, there has been no mention of this possibility. Actually, the
throwaway disks are being promoted a single-layer, movie-only,
featureless product. However, DIVX, the first throwaway format, had lots
of exclusive titles. Undoubtedly, Circuit City was attempting to destroy
the DVD market and replace it with DIVX. The Circuit City goal was to
totally reverse its earlier strategy of selling DVD players with the
DIVX feature. Their ultimate goal was to sell DIVX players with the DVD
feature.

<<I really think the market will take care of itself just as it did with
DIVX ...>>

Yes -- finally. However, some of the formerly-exclusive DIVX titles took
over 4 years to get released in Region 1. And a few titles, such as
_Dying Young_, _Ed Wood_, _Mulholland Falls_, _Paperback Romance_ and
_Rocket Man_ have still not been released as Region 1 DVDs. The fact is
that the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format tried to steal from the
DVD format and the new throwaway disks will try to do the same thing.

The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles. This
scenario is not that far fetched, because it has happened before.



 
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Charles Tomaras
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003

"Scot Gardner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:20030901152342.533$(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Charles Tomaras" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> <<Where have you seen mention that these (throwaway) discs will be
> exclusive? Where have you seen mention that they will supplant full
> non-degrading DVD's?>>
>
> So far, there has been no mention of this possibility. Actually, the
> throwaway disks are being promoted a single-layer, movie-only,
> featureless product. However, DIVX, the first throwaway format, had lots
> of exclusive titles. Undoubtedly, Circuit City was attempting to destroy
> the DVD market and replace it with DIVX. The Circuit City goal was to
> totally reverse its earlier strategy of selling DVD players with the
> DIVX feature. Their ultimate goal was to sell DIVX players with the DVD
> feature.
>
> <<I really think the market will take care of itself just as it did with
> DIVX ...>>
>
> Yes -- finally. However, some of the formerly-exclusive DIVX titles took
> over 4 years to get released in Region 1. And a few titles, such as
> _Dying Young_, _Ed Wood_, _Mulholland Falls_, _Paperback Romance_ and
> _Rocket Man_ have still not been released as Region 1 DVDs. The fact is
> that the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format tried to steal from the
> DVD format and the new throwaway disks will try to do the same thing.
>
> The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
> try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles. This
> scenario is not that far fetched, because it has happened before.



We shall just have to see what happens. Thanks for the civil discussion.


 
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privacy.at Anonymous Remailer
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003

>The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
>try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles.


As far as exclusivity of throwaway disc titles, Is there any reason to
believe people won't be able to copy them and make DVD-R's out of them? If
so, seems the idea might turn around and bite Disney from the get-go.

 
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Scot Gardner
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-01-2003
"privacy.at Anonymous Remailer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
message news:(E-Mail Removed) vacy.at...

>The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
>try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles.


<<As far as exclusivity of throwaway disc titles, Is there any reason to
believe people won't be able to copy them and make DVD-R's out of them?
If so, seems the idea might turn around and bite Disney from the
get-go.>>


Judging from the huge number of posts, people are already having plenty
of difficulty copying regular DVDs. On the other hand, here's an article
which claims that there will be no difficulty in copying the new,
self-destructive, "ez-D" DVDs from Flexplay Technologies:

*** *** ***

Cyber Cynic: Self Destructive DVDs and New Business Models
By Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols -- 30 May 2003

Walt Disney's home video unit Buena Vista division, using Flexplay
Technologies technology, is going to start selling DVDs that
self-destuct after two days in August. It's both an incredibly good and
an incredibly stupid idea

The technology, ez-D, is elegant and simple. The discs stop working
because they change from a DVD-readable red to an unreadable black
because of oxidation. You open them up, letting the oxygen in, watch
them and in 48 hours you have a coaster instead of a DVD.

Buena Vista has two motives for these novel DVDs. The business is that
since buyers don't have to return DVDs, they can sell DVDs pretty much
anywhere. While Buena Vista isn't telling, it's clear from their
language that they're going to be pricing these disposable DVDs at close
to current rental rates.

For idiots like me who waste money by being cogently unable to get a DVD
back to Blockbusters in time, 'rental' DVDs make perfect sense. Better
still for Disney, there are enough people like me, or people who'd pick
up a DVD as an impulse buy if it were three to five bucks at the local
7-11, that this technology will almost certainly give the financially
struggling mouse a financial boost. That's the good idea.

The bad idea, the incredibly stupid idea, that some people at Disney,
not Flexplay, has is that ex-D is somehow an anti-cracker technology. Oh
please!

The fact that the disc has a limited lifespan because of a chemical
reaction instead of a software based Digital Rights Management (DRM)
scheme somehow will stop hackers from getting at its contents is
nonsense. With 48 hours to crack the DVD, and anti-cracking and DVD
copying software commonplace, ez-D is no more a effective copy
protection than the shrink-wrap the DVD comes in.

Besides, even though legal action against DVD encryption and copying
software companies like Internet Enterprises Inc, RDestiny LLC,
HowtocopyDVDs.com, DVDBackupbuddy.command DVDSqueeze.com is heating up
with multiple law suits from Paramount and Twentieth Century Fox, the
studios don't seem to understand that breaking copy protection per se
isn't really the problem. The DVD copying companies claim that they're
simply enabling legal owners of a DVD ability to make backup copies of
their DVDs. The studios reply that breaking a DVD's copy protection
under the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is illegal
regardless of the copy's use.

Of course, the real problem is that technology has fundamentally broken
the business model of high-priced restricted access to copyright
material. No copy protection scheme will stand against copy cracking
efforts. No law suits will then stop the copy protection breaking
software from spreading.

Technology has opened Pandora's copyright protection box forever.
Neither technology or the law can close it.

There is another way though. Embrace the new models. Sound impossible?
Think again and see Napster Reborn for the details.

http://www.practical-tech.com/business/b0529003.htm



 
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keved
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2003
in article http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed), Charles Tomaras at
(E-Mail Removed) wrote on 9/1/03 10:00 AM:

>
> "Scot Gardner" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:20030901113746.844$(E-Mail Removed)...
>> "Charles Tomaras" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>> news(E-Mail Removed)...
>>
>> <<Quite frankly I don't understand what all the fuss is over it. These
>> companies should be able to market their products in any fashion they
>> see fit. If you don't like there are many other alternatives. I see this
>> as giving us more choice and not hampering us in any way.>>
>>
>>
>> There are no alternatives to a throwaway DVD if it is an exclusive
>> title that is not available as a normal DVD. Throwaway DVD will give you
>> less choice, not more. The first throwaway disk came from Circuit City,
>> which introduced the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format. Some of the
>> DIVX titles were exclusive to the DIVX format and not available as
>> Region 1 DVDs.

>
>
> Where have you seen mention that these discs will be exclusive?


This comes from knowledge about the industry. Initially few if any would be
exclusive. I would bet that Flexplay will be a failure, but...if the
studios could have their way, disposable DVDs would be successful enough
that titles could be released exclusively in this format. Disney is company
#1 in terms of wishing there was a mass-accepted expirable format that they
could use as the sole means of releasing their formats. Coincidence that
they were the first one to sign up for Flexplay?

> Where have you
> seen mention that they will supplant full non-degrading DVD's? I really think
> the market will take care of itself just as it did with DIVX and I don't think
> this is an apples to apples comparison with DIVX anyway, which was a coalition
> of hardware, software and retailer.


Actually, it was the coalition that was a disadvantage to Divx. It meant
that early adopters had to buy into the format...however early DVD adopters
at the time were fanatically opposed to the concept of Divx. Go through the
archives of the usenet postings at the time and you'll see the thing we
feared most was that if DVD manufacturers all got on board along with the
studios before Joe S. Pack did, that critical mass could be achieved.

Disposable DVDs can market straight to Joe S. Pack without getting early
adopters to accept the format. This makes disposable DVDs a greater threat
than Divx to conventional DVDs.




 
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Charles Tomaras
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2003

"keved" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:BB792C25.1CAAA%(E-Mail Removed). ..
> > Where have you
> > seen mention that they will supplant full non-degrading DVD's? I really

think
> > the market will take care of itself just as it did with DIVX and I don't

think
> > this is an apples to apples comparison with DIVX anyway, which was a

coalition
> > of hardware, software and retailer.

>
> Actually, it was the coalition that was a disadvantage to Divx. It meant
> that early adopters had to buy into the format...however early DVD adopters
> at the time were fanatically opposed to the concept of Divx. Go through the
> archives of the usenet postings at the time and you'll see the thing we
> feared most was that if DVD manufacturers all got on board along with the
> studios before Joe S. Pack did, that critical mass could be achieved.


I remember, I was there. I'm sure my anti-DIVX posts are recorded for posterity!


>
> Disposable DVDs can market straight to Joe S. Pack without getting early
> adopters to accept the format. This makes disposable DVDs a greater threat
> than Divx to conventional DVDs.


I really have to say that I think it is the right of the motion picture
companies to market their products as they wish and it is the right of the
market place to respond. I don't think it will fly further than a convenience
item as I've mentioned before.


 
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Kevin Scholl
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2003

Scot Gardner wrote:

> <<Where have you seen mention that these (throwaway) discs will be
> exclusive? Where have you seen mention that they will supplant full
> non-degrading DVD's?>>
>
> So far, there has been no mention of this possibility. Actually, the
> throwaway disks are being promoted a single-layer, movie-only,
> featureless product. However, DIVX, the first throwaway format, had lots
> of exclusive titles. Undoubtedly, Circuit City was attempting to destroy
> the DVD market and replace it with DIVX. The Circuit City goal was to
> totally reverse its earlier strategy of selling DVD players with the
> DIVX feature. Their ultimate goal was to sell DIVX players with the DVD
> feature.


Sheesh, Scot, you're like a broken record whenever Divx comes up.
"Circuit City was attempting to destroy the DVD market" -- total
nonsense. There was never even any implication of what you claim above,
much less proof. Quite the contrary, Circuit stated their objectives
from day one of announcement, and never did anything negative to deviate
from that. In fact, the only significant change to the Divx model
throughout its run was the elimination of the proposed DivxGold, because
once it was apparent that DVD had caught on beyond the niche collector
market, there was no reason for it.

I find this fantasy -- "ultimate goal was to sell DIVX players with the
DVD feature" -- to be paritcularly amusing. Since in terms of playback
Divx was nothing more than encrypted DVD format streams, you had to have
DVD playback in order to have Divx. In other words, take away DVD
capability, there was no Divx playback.

Oh, and for your information, Divx wasn't intended to be "throwaway".
While that was certainly possible, the intention was for those who
bought the discs to keep them, in the event they wished to view them in
the future.

> <<I really think the market will take care of itself just as it did with
> DIVX ...>>
>
> Yes -- finally. However, some of the formerly-exclusive DIVX titles took
> over 4 years to get released in Region 1. And a few titles, such as
> _Dying Young_, _Ed Wood_, _Mulholland Falls_, _Paperback Romance_ and
> _Rocket Man_ have still not been released as Region 1 DVDs. The fact is
> that the DIVX proprietary, digital disk format tried to steal from the
> DVD format and the new throwaway disks will try to do the same thing.


How did Divx try to "steal" anything? Please explain this very general,
and very strange, accusation.

> The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
> try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles. This
> scenario is not that far fetched, because it has happened before.


If by "it has happened before" you mean with Divx, you again show your
lack of knowledge. Divx never had any exclusivity contracts with any
studios for any titles. None. Indeed, Divx was not even responsible for
what titles were made available as part of the Divx system. The STUDIOS
made those decisions, and will likely do so with the proposed throwaway
disc. The difference now is that the studios now see the great lucrative
potential of DVD. I can't see them limiting their selections at this point.

But by all means, feel free to continue your ranting, however delusional
your reasoning may be.

--

*** Remove the DELETE from my address to reply ***

==================================================
Kevin Scholl
(E-Mail Removed)
==================================================

 
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Scot Gardner
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-02-2003
"Kevin Scholl" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
Scot Gardner wrote:

<<But by all means, feel free to continue your ranting, however
delusional your reasoning may be.>>

I have read your rebuttal with interest and I am still convinced that
DVD would have been even more successful even sooner had there been no
DIVX. By its very existence, DIVX created confusion and thereby, stole
initial consumer acceptance away from DVD. I am not alone in this
viewpoint. Below is a post that I made on Monday, May 17, 1999 8:18 PM,
in which Warren Lieberfarb (President of Warner Home Video) made an
astonishing prophesy: "Due to its speculative economic and marketplace
assumptions, Divx will fail, leaving Divx consumers tricked again by a
consumer-electronics gimmick. As a doomed-for-failure, competing
technology, Divx clearly does not help the DVD format."


Here is my post:

My June issue of Stereo Review's Sound & Vision arrived today. On page
98 there is a point/counterpoint article featuring Richard L. Sharp
(Chairman and CEO of Circuit City Stores and Digital Video Express) and
Warren Lieberfarb (President of Warner Home Video.)

Richard Sharp reiterated the supposed advantages of the Divx format: No
expensive DVDs to buy, no late fees and no return trips to the video
rental store. The primary argument made by Mr. Sharp is largely
defensive: "The Divx feature is growing demand for DVD players as much
as it is for DVD discs. Every DIVX-enhanced player sold represents
another customer for DVD, one more household to help the format succeed.
And we at Divx hope that DVD does succeed. After all, Divx is not
competing with DVD, we are complementing it."

Warren Lieberfarb is not impressed by Mr. Sharp's explanation of the
supposed advantages of the DIVX format, and he is particularly
unimpressed by Sharp's proclaimed love of DVD. To quote Mr. Lieberfarb:

"The Divx concept was developed in 1993 to confront two issues. First,
it tried to address the inability of existing video-rental business
models to satisfy consumer demand for new blockbuster movies for home
viewing. This dissatisfaction was caused both by the initial slow
rollout of NVOD (near-video-on-demand) by cable operators and by the
unacceptable out-of-stock position of new releases in video stores.
Second, Divx was attempting to satisfy the studio's desire to
participate in retail rental revenues as the VHS business exploded."

"Due to 1) current widespread revenue-sharing programs in video stores,
2) attractively priced DVDs for purchase and rental, and 3) the growth
of NVOD through cable and satellite, the issues for which Divx was
created have dissipated. This makes Divx irrelevant and a solution to
problems that no longer exist."

"Despite what Divx claims, about being complementary, Divx is a
competing technology. Divx disks will only work in Divx players; they
will not work in the more than 1.4 million DVD players or the 6 million
DVD-ROM drives that are already in consumer's homes. In the end, the
only service Divx provides is to cause consumer confusion. Due to its
speculative economic and marketplace assumptions, Divx will fail,
leaving Divx consumers tricked again by a consumer-electronics gimmick.
As a doomed-for-failure, competing technology, Divx clearly does not
help the DVD format."

"Of course, DVD will continue to succeed as a convergent breakthrough
technology that has redefined packaged home entertainment for sale and
rental - - despite Divx. However, I can't help but wonder how well it
would have done if fairly represented in Circuit City stores. Come to
think of it, I wonder how well DVD would have done without the consumer
confusion introduced by Divx in the first place."

Circuit City is clearly playing out of its league when it attempts to
outsmart those who are truly experts in the home video game. I feel that
there is a great deal of validity in what Warren Lieberfarb has said on
the subject of DIVX. Apparently other movie studios, such as Paramount,
Fox, Dreamworks, Universal, MGM, Miramax etc. are coming around to
Warren Lieberfarb's way of thinking.


*** *** ***

Previous conversation:

> <<Where have you seen mention that these (throwaway) discs will be
> exclusive? Where have you seen mention that they will supplant full
> non-degrading DVD's?>>
>
> So far, there has been no mention of this possibility. Actually, the
> throwaway disks are being promoted a single-layer, movie-only,
> featureless product. However, DIVX, the first throwaway format, had
> lots of exclusive titles. Undoubtedly, Circuit City was attempting to
> destroy the DVD market and replace it with DIVX. The Circuit City
> goal was to totally reverse its earlier strategy of selling DVD
> players with the DIVX feature. Their ultimate goal was to sell DIVX
> players with the DVD feature.


Sheesh, Scot, you're like a broken record whenever Divx comes up.
"Circuit City was attempting to destroy the DVD market" -- total
nonsense. There was never even any implication of what you claim above,
much less proof. Quite the contrary, Circuit stated their objectives
from day one of announcement, and never did anything negative to deviate
from that. In fact, the only significant change to the Divx model
throughout its run was the elimination of the proposed DivxGold, because
once it was apparent that DVD had caught on beyond the niche collector
market, there was no reason for it.

I find this fantasy -- "ultimate goal was to sell DIVX players with the
DVD feature" -- to be paritcularly amusing. Since in terms of playback
Divx was nothing more than encrypted DVD format streams, you had to have
DVD playback in order to have Divx. In other words, take away DVD
capability, there was no Divx playback.

Oh, and for your information, Divx wasn't intended to be "throwaway".
While that was certainly possible, the intention was for those who
bought the discs to keep them, in the event they wished to view them in
the future.

> <<I really think the market will take care of itself just as it did
> with DIVX ...>>
>
> Yes -- finally. However, some of the formerly-exclusive DIVX titles
> took over 4 years to get released in Region 1. And a few titles, such
> as _Dying Young_, _Ed Wood_, _Mulholland Falls_, _Paperback
> Romance_ and _Rocket Man_ have still not been released as
> Region 1 DVDs. The fact is that the DIVX proprietary, digital disk
> format tried to steal from the DVD format and the new throwaway
> disks will try to do the same thing.


How did Divx try to "steal" anything? Please explain this very general,
and very strange, accusation.

> The proposed new self-destructing, throwaway DVD format will probably
> try to jump-start itself by creating some exclusive titles. This
> scenario is not that far fetched, because it has happened before.


If by "it has happened before" you mean with Divx, you again show your
lack of knowledge. Divx never had any exclusivity contracts with any
studios for any titles. None. Indeed, Divx was not even responsible for
what titles were made available as part of the Divx system. The STUDIOS
made those decisions, and will likely do so with the proposed throwaway
disc. The difference now is that the studios now see the great lucrative
potential of DVD. I can't see them limiting their selections at this
point.

But by all means, feel free to continue your ranting, however delusional
your reasoning may be.

--

*** Remove the DELETE from my address to reply ***

==================================================
Kevin Scholl
(E-Mail Removed)
==================================================


 
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