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7dayshop - now with VAT

 
 
David Littlewood
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      07-31-2004
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Stevie Boy
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>
>If a company decides not to be competitive within the market place and
>therefore sells their goods at a higher than competitive price in order to
>maximise profits then that is price fixing. Likewise if they decide to
>undercut EVERY soul in the market in order to maximise sales then that is
>price fixing.
>

Only on your planet, Steve. The term "price fixing" has a legal
definition, as others have pointed out. Using your definition, then
every one who sells goods at a price is "price fixing".
--
David Littlewood
 
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Janie Thomson
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      07-31-2004

"Mark Dunn" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:cefo0p$b4t$(E-Mail Removed)...
> You can't refuse- the duty is allowed for in their terms and conditions. I
> read them- that's why I bought my c725 from pixmania. More money but
> predictable.



Yes you can. The PO told me I could refuse to accept the EOS300D I bought
from 7dayshop. This would have avoided the VAT and PO handling charge.
7dayshop's terms and conditions also specify you can return an item unopened
if you change your mind within 7 (IIRC) days of receipt. I had already
budgeted for the VAT anyway, and the PO charges were only 4. The total
still came in under the next best price I could find for the camera at the
time from an EU source with VAT and delivery charges included. If I bought
it now from 7dayshop I would save myself about 40. I don't consider myself
to have been ripped off (well, not by 7dayshop anyway!).


--
Janie
http://www.janie-thomson.co.uk
janiethomson at janie-thomson dot co dot uk


 
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Colin Reddish
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      07-31-2004

"Paul F" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:ceg6r9$as2$(E-Mail Removed)...

> Could we have some tolerance on this group of opinions with which we might
> not agree? I think its a bit pathetic the way you and others have slammed
> into this bloke because he happens to differ from your opinions on
> acceptable business practices.


I think you are being rather generous there Paul. Steve Boy is clearly
talking rubbish but refuses to accept statements of fact from other posters.

> Yours respectfully


Yours even more respectfully
--
Colin Reddish


 
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Rev Adrian Kennard
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      07-31-2004
David Littlewood wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Stevie Boy
> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>
>>
>> If a company decides not to be competitive within the market place and
>> therefore sells their goods at a higher than competitive price in
>> order to
>> maximise profits then that is price fixing. Likewise if they decide to
>> undercut EVERY soul in the market in order to maximise sales then that is
>> price fixing.
>>

> Only on your planet, Steve. The term "price fixing" has a legal
> definition, as others have pointed out. Using your definition, then
> every one who sells goods at a price is "price fixing".


And I suspect it is not "fixed". I am sure if you offered them more than
they are asking they will happily sell goods at that higher price... <-:

--
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Sabineellen
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      07-31-2004
>
>Well I disagree. I so no reason why a company has to be in conjunction with
>others to price fix.
>There is an upper price index for goods controlled by the RRP and generally
>a lower price index controlled by what the manufacturer will allow it to be
>sold, which is generally controlled by the buying in price and your profit
>margin.
>
>If a company decides not to be competitive within the market place and
>therefore sells their goods at a higher than competitive price in order to
>maximise profits then that is price fixing. Likewise if they decide to
>undercut EVERY soul in the market in order to maximise sales then that is
>price fixing.
>
>Steve
>


The RRP is not an upper price index and it doesn't control anything; it's
merely a ***Recommended*** Retial Price and sellers are free to sell lower or
higher than it is.

There is a term called "price fixing", which is like the others said concerns
competition. So it applies in cases of a monopoly inflating the price of the
product or an oligarchy of businesses (cartel) engage in anti-competitive
practice of agreeing not to sell under a certain price, therefore depriving the
consumer of choice.

>If a company decides not to be competitive within the market place and
>therefore sells their goods at a higher than competitive price in order to
>maximise profits then that is price fixing.


There's no law against that unless it's a monopoly or a cartel. As long as the
consumer can get it elsewhere at ordinary prices there's nothing illegal there.
It doesn't necessarily make good business sense for a company to sell at such
high prices unless they're providing some additional value.

> Likewise if they decide to
>undercut EVERY soul in the market in order to maximise sales then that is
>price fixing.


That's called "predatory pricing", Rupert Murdoch's newspapers are somewhat
famous for that. The Microsoft vs Netscape thing is too. It's an
anti-competitive practice.

You could read a chapter from an economics textbook about competition. It'll
clarify all these issues.

 
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Stevie Boy
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      07-31-2004

> I can see where you are coming from, based on the words, but there is an
> accepted term called "price fixing"


I agree I never said anything to the contrary.

> It think the term for what you describe is "pricing yourself out of the
> market"
>


Yes that is another way of putting it but that only applies if you sell your
goods at a higher than average price.

Steve


 
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Stevie Boy
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2004

> Only on your planet, Steve. The term "price fixing" has a legal
> definition, as others have pointed out. Using your definition, then
> every one who sells goods at a price is "price fixing".


----------------

Thats not what I said.


 
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Stevie Boy
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      07-31-2004

">
> And I suspect it is not "fixed". I am sure if you offered them more than
> they are asking they will happily sell goods at that higher price... <-:
>
> --


Then that would not be price fixing.


 
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Stevie Boy
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      07-31-2004

"Colin Reddish" <creddish@(removespamblock)freegratis.net> wrote in message
news:vCOOc.221$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> "Paul F" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:ceg6r9$as2$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> > Could we have some tolerance on this group of opinions with which we

might
> > not agree? I think its a bit pathetic the way you and others have

slammed
> > into this bloke because he happens to differ from your opinions on
> > acceptable business practices.

>
> I think you are being rather generous there Paul. Steve Boy is clearly
> talking rubbish but refuses to accept statements of fact from other

posters.
>


LOL. I love my comments thay always get a good response


 
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Stevie Boy
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-31-2004

"Lordy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) .com...
> > If a company decides not to be competitive within the market place

>
> If their prices are lower than obtainable here, then they /are/ being
> competitive.


You mis-interpreted by what I meant to be competitive. This meaning having
prices (whether higher or lower) simliar to other retailers. Therefore being
competitive with them. Not merely just higher or lower.

> > and therefore sells their goods at a higher than competitive price
> > in order to maximise profits then that is price fixing.

>
> That is the nature of supply and demand. This may come as a bit of a
> surprise to you, but people that sell things are not doing it to pass
> the time, they're in it for the money (seriously !).


You don't say. That is not a point in argument.

> > Likewise if they decide to undercut EVERY soul in the market in
> > order to maximise sales then that is price fixing.

>
> You're just completely losing the plot now.
>
>


I think I know where I'm coming from. CD-WOW had the best prices for CD's
for a long time until they were forced to up their prices. It may not be
price fixing in the terms you are thinking of but it is fixing prices to be
the best.

Steve


 
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