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Would like input on my thumbnail webpage design

 
 
delerious@no.spam.com
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      07-25-2004
I'm designing a web site for some of my travel photos, and I'm wondering how I
should design the pages that show the thumbnails. I would like to show
thumbnails as well as descriptions for each picture.

On all the photo sites that I've seen, if a page has thumbnails AND
descriptions, then it's done in one of three ways:

1) the page just shows all the thumbnails, and in order to see a description,
you have to move your mouse over a thumbnail, and a "tooltip" will appear with
the description (this is done by using either the ALT or TITLE attribute,
depending on the browser)

2) the page consists of a bunch of "rows" going down, with one thumbnail per
row. Each thumbnail appears on the left side of a row and has a description
to the right of it.

3) the page consists of a bunch of "rows", but there might be 3 or possibly 4
thumbnails per row. Underneath each thumbnail is a description.


I would prefer not to use method 1, as I would like all of the descriptions to
be visible on the page. I would also like to just set the ALT attribute to
"thumbnail" instead of the description, which might actually be fairly long.

I'd also like my thumbnails to be pretty close together and all visible at the
same time (assuming there aren't too many), so that rules out methods 2 and 3.

So I've come up with my own design, which I haven't seen on the web. I'm
going to have my thumbnails in rows, with as many thumbnails as possible in
each row. Each thumbnail will also have a number next to it. Then right
below all of the thumbnails will be the descriptions. Here is an example of
what it will look like:

http://home.comcast.net/~delerious1/test13.html

So if you look at a thumbnail and want to know what the description is, just
look below all of the thumbnails and find the number of the thumbnail (which
will probably be bolded so that it's easier to find). Oh yeah, my example
page isn't set up for it, but you will be able to click on each thumbnail,
which will take you to another page with a larger version of the image and the
same description that appeared on the thumbnail page.

What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of the
screen to find its description? Any other problems?

Thanks for your input.

 
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Pepe
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-25-2004
Hi,
Try this one: http://www.fotostation.com/
Very handy for what you need Photo on CD.
And also make web gallery for easy use.

Pepe

<(E-Mail Removed)> skrev i meddelandet
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> I'm designing a web site for some of my travel photos, and I'm wondering

how I
> should design the pages that show the thumbnails. I would like to show
> thumbnails as well as descriptions for each picture.
>
> On all the photo sites that I've seen, if a page has thumbnails AND
> descriptions, then it's done in one of three ways:
>
> 1) the page just shows all the thumbnails, and in order to see a

description,
> you have to move your mouse over a thumbnail, and a "tooltip" will appear

with
> the description (this is done by using either the ALT or TITLE attribute,
> depending on the browser)
>
> 2) the page consists of a bunch of "rows" going down, with one thumbnail

per
> row. Each thumbnail appears on the left side of a row and has a

description
> to the right of it.
>
> 3) the page consists of a bunch of "rows", but there might be 3 or

possibly 4
> thumbnails per row. Underneath each thumbnail is a description.
>
>
> I would prefer not to use method 1, as I would like all of the

descriptions to
> be visible on the page. I would also like to just set the ALT attribute

to
> "thumbnail" instead of the description, which might actually be fairly

long.
>
> I'd also like my thumbnails to be pretty close together and all visible at

the
> same time (assuming there aren't too many), so that rules out methods 2

and 3.
>
> So I've come up with my own design, which I haven't seen on the web. I'm
> going to have my thumbnails in rows, with as many thumbnails as possible

in
> each row. Each thumbnail will also have a number next to it. Then right
> below all of the thumbnails will be the descriptions. Here is an example

of
> what it will look like:
>
> http://home.comcast.net/~delerious1/test13.html
>
> So if you look at a thumbnail and want to know what the description is,

just
> look below all of the thumbnails and find the number of the thumbnail

(which
> will probably be bolded so that it's easier to find). Oh yeah, my example
> page isn't set up for it, but you will be able to click on each thumbnail,
> which will take you to another page with a larger version of the image and

the
> same description that appeared on the thumbnail page.
>
> What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
> looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of

the
> screen to find its description? Any other problems?
>
> Thanks for your input.
>



 
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Richard Ballard
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Posts: n/a
 
      07-25-2004
I have not visited your website.

The precedents in 35mm film photography are fileable plastic
sleeves that hold a number of 35mm slides, and fileable
proofsheets that provide a number of positive thumbnail views
(contact prints) of 35mm negatives. Sheets of paper listing
numbered written comments also are fileable. File folders
and file cabinets are inexpensive and readily available.

I recommend reviewing commercial software products to determine
how thumbnails, larger images and comments have been
successfully interrelated for dSLR users.

I would emphasize ease of maintenance and ease of update
when designing your website. You will want to highlight
your most recent travel/business photography, a constant
update chore. As time passes, old photography tends to get
shuffled to the back of the file cabinet as photographers
seek new paying customer$.

In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) writes:

>I'm designing a web site for some of my travel photos, and I'm
>wondering how I
>should design the pages that show the thumbnails. I would like to show
>thumbnails as well as descriptions for each picture.
>
>On all the photo sites that I've seen, if a page has thumbnails AND
>descriptions, then it's done in one of three ways:
>
>1) the page just shows all the thumbnails, and in order to see a
>description,
>you have to move your mouse over a thumbnail, and a "tooltip" will appear
>with
>the description (this is done by using either the ALT or TITLE attribute,
>depending on the browser)
>
>2) the page consists of a bunch of "rows" going down, with one thumbnail
>per row. Each thumbnail appears on the left side of a row and has a
>description
>to the right of it.
>
>3) the page consists of a bunch of "rows", but there might be 3 or
>possibly 4
>thumbnails per row. Underneath each thumbnail is a description.
>
>I would prefer not to use method 1, as I would like all of the descriptions
>to
>be visible on the page. I would also like to just set the ALT attribute to
>"thumbnail" instead of the description, which might actually be fairly >long.
>
>I'd also like my thumbnails to be pretty close together and all visible at
>the
>same time (assuming there aren't too many), so that rules out methods 2 and
>3.
>
>So I've come up with my own design, which I haven't seen on the web. I'm
>going to have my thumbnails in rows, with as many thumbnails as possible in
>each row. Each thumbnail will also have a number next to it. Then right
>below all of the thumbnails will be the descriptions. Here is an example >of
>what it will look like:


<RB snipped URL>

>So if you look at a thumbnail and want to know what the description is, >just
>look below all of the thumbnails and find the number of the thumbnail >(which
>will probably be bolded so that it's easier to find). Oh yeah, my example
>page isn't set up for it, but you will be able to click on each thumbnail,
>which will take you to another page with a larger version of the image and
>the
>same description that appeared on the thumbnail page.
>
>What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
>looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of
>the
>screen to find its description? Any other problems?
>
>Thanks for your input.


'Hope that helps.

Richard Ballard MSEE CNA4 KD0AZ
--
Consultant specializing in computer networks, imaging & security
Listed as rjballard in "Friends & Favorites" at www.amazon.com
Last book review: "Guerrilla Television" by Michael Shamberg

 
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Phil Stripling
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2004
(E-Mail Removed) writes:

> So if you look at a thumbnail and want to know what the description is,
> just look below all of the thumbnails and find the number of the
> thumbnail (which will probably be bolded so that it's easier to find).
> Oh yeah, my example page isn't set up for it, but you will be able to
> click on each thumbnail, which will take you to another page with a
> larger version of the image and the same description that appeared on the
> thumbnail page.
>
> What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
> looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of the
> screen to find its description? Any other problems?


First, I think it's too much trouble to do. You're going to be creating and
maintaining these pages, and I think you've set yourself up for too much
trouble.

Second, I'm not sure how interested your many viewers will be in the
descriptions on your thumbnail page. Having the descriptions out of order,
as you do, is an aggravation for people just browsing who want a quick idea
what the photo is about.

I think you've reinvented the wheel, but that it has been done better. My
suggestion is a layout I often see. A page of nothing but thumbnails, each
one clickable, and a link to succeeding pages, if any. If you click on a
thumbnail, you see the full-size image with any description. Each page with
the full size photo has a back arrow (previous full-size image), up arrow
(return to the index page with the thumbnail of that photo, and a forward
arrow (next full size image).

I've forgotten how many free photo display sites I've seen this on, but it
seems to be a standard, and I think sticking to standards makes it easier
for people who are dropping by your site.

I suggest a different index page of thumbnails for each topic, and a
text-only site index giving all topics and sub-topics. Each page should
have a master navigation section which lets people coming in from a search
engine easily find your 'real' home page in case they want to see more.

If you want to do it the way you have it set up, go ahead and give it a
shot. You may have a real winner that takes the Web by storm. Or you may
have a labor of love that becomes just laborious. My suspicion is that the
more automated you make it the more likely you are to keep at it for more
than a month. I could be wrong, though.
--
Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip@
http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.
 
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delerious@no.spam.com
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2004
On 25 Jul 2004 18:06:52 -0700, Phil Stripling <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
>First, I think it's too much trouble to do. You're going to be creating and
>maintaining these pages, and I think you've set yourself up for too much
>trouble.


Well, yeah, I do have to spend some time to create the pages, but I don't see
having to spend time in the future to maintain the pages. The trip that I
went on has already passed, so it's not like any details of it will change in
the future.


>Second, I'm not sure how interested your many viewers will be in the
>descriptions on your thumbnail page. Having the descriptions out of order,
>as you do, is an aggravation for people just browsing who want a quick idea
>what the photo is about.


OK, I see what you are saying. I might have a description for photo #1,
followed by a description for photos #2 and #8 (if both photos have the same
description), followed by a description for photo #3... I could just not
"bundle" the descriptions together, and have separate descriptions for each
photo, even if some are the same. So the descriptions would be in order,
although there may still be some gaps in the numbers, because not all of my
photos will have descriptions.


>If you want to do it the way you have it set up, go ahead and give it a
>shot. You may have a real winner that takes the Web by storm.


Lol, well my intent isn't to try launch a new trend on the web, but I wouldn't
complain if that happens. The good thing is that this is just a personal
site, so if people end up not liking my design, then it won't be a big deal.


> Or you may
>have a labor of love that becomes just laborious. My suspicion is that the
>more automated you make it the more likely you are to keep at it for more
>than a month. I could be wrong, though.


I actually *am* going to write perl scripts to generate most of my HTML pages.
So once I figure out a design and write up the code for one page, then it
shouldn't be too much work after that.

 
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Juergen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2004
Try this link for JAlbum. It's an Open Source Program and does
everything you nedd.



http://jalbum.net/samples.jsp

(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

> I'm designing a web site for some of my travel photos, and I'm wondering how I
> should design the pages that show the thumbnails. I would like to show
> thumbnails as well as descriptions for each picture.
>
> On all the photo sites that I've seen, if a page has thumbnails AND
> descriptions, then it's done in one of three ways:
>
> 1) the page just shows all the thumbnails, and in order to see a description,
> you have to move your mouse over a thumbnail, and a "tooltip" will appear with
> the description (this is done by using either the ALT or TITLE attribute,
> depending on the browser)
>
> 2) the page consists of a bunch of "rows" going down, with one thumbnail per
> row. Each thumbnail appears on the left side of a row and has a description
> to the right of it.
>
> 3) the page consists of a bunch of "rows", but there might be 3 or possibly 4
> thumbnails per row. Underneath each thumbnail is a description.
>
>
> I would prefer not to use method 1, as I would like all of the descriptions to
> be visible on the page. I would also like to just set the ALT attribute to
> "thumbnail" instead of the description, which might actually be fairly long.
>
> I'd also like my thumbnails to be pretty close together and all visible at the
> same time (assuming there aren't too many), so that rules out methods 2 and 3.
>
> So I've come up with my own design, which I haven't seen on the web. I'm
> going to have my thumbnails in rows, with as many thumbnails as possible in
> each row. Each thumbnail will also have a number next to it. Then right
> below all of the thumbnails will be the descriptions. Here is an example of
> what it will look like:
>
> http://home.comcast.net/~delerious1/test13.html
>
> So if you look at a thumbnail and want to know what the description is, just
> look below all of the thumbnails and find the number of the thumbnail (which
> will probably be bolded so that it's easier to find). Oh yeah, my example
> page isn't set up for it, but you will be able to click on each thumbnail,
> which will take you to another page with a larger version of the image and the
> same description that appeared on the thumbnail page.
>
> What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
> looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of the
> screen to find its description? Any other problems?
>
> Thanks for your input.
>


 
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Crownfield
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-26-2004
Phil Stripling wrote:
>
> (E-Mail Removed) writes:
> > What do you think of this design? Is it OK, or would you be annoyed at
> > looking at a thumbnail and then having to move your eyes to the bottom of the
> > screen to find its description? Any other problems?

>
> First, I think it's too much trouble to do. You're going to be creating and
> maintaining these pages, and I think you've set yourself up for too much
> trouble.


What you need is Image Display System, a free Perl script.

users link to the ids index script with a web browser,
and the script generates the thumbnail pages,
generates the full pages, and lets the user adjust the image size,
add, and view the comments attached to the images.
you add another image, ids handles it instantly,
and the next viewer sees it.

all you do is upload files into the folders,
and ids makes the thumbnails on request, dynamically.
(I do use ids admin to create and comment the folders.)
once created, the script does everything else,
and you just ftp files up to the site.

no pages, no thumbnails, no worries.

If you have any questions, email.
>
> Philip Stripling | email to the replyto address is presumed
> Legal Assistance on the Web | spam and read later. email to philip@
> http://www.PhilipStripling.com/ | my domain is read daily.

 
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