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Delay when taking picture

 
 
Kayla
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      06-29-2004
Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.

Lori
 
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David J Taylor
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      06-29-2004
"Kayla" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
>
> Lori


No, any camera (digital or not) will have a delay after taking a picture.

How much delay after taking the picture is acceptable to you?

What camera are you currently using which shows this problem?

Cheers,
David


 
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Ron Hunter
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      06-29-2004
Kayla wrote:

> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
>
> Lori


Well, are you talking about delay for focusing and light metering, which
happens before the sensor is read for the image, or the delay after
taking the picture while the camera stores the image to memory card and
recharges the flash (if used)? If the former, certainly there are many
newer cameras where this is little, if any, longer than similar times
for film cameras, and if the latter, then many cameras will allow
multiple shots to an internal buffer (mine allows 6 at highest
resolution), but flash recharge affects ALL cameras.
 
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Don F
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      06-29-2004
"Kayla" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
>
> Lori

-------------------
It appears, from your post, that you have an older digital camera. I
have Coolpix 950. I watch an hour glass (in the display) blink for 3 to 5
seconds after taking a picture. Not acceptable at all.
I also have the new Nikon D70 (DSLR) which can pop off 3 frames per
second. This is both because of an internal memory buffer (mentioned in the
above post) and the availability of high speed memory cards used in cameras
that support them.
There has been a steady improvement in technology from the time I bought
my 950 and today so your camera (like my 950) is probably slow by today's
standards.
Don F




 
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Kayla
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      06-29-2004
Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture that
I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and then
the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a parade.
I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by the time
the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in the
picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am wanting
to get a new one.

Lori


On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 07:48:10 -0500, Ron Hunter <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>Kayla wrote:
>
>> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
>> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
>>
>> Lori

>
>Well, are you talking about delay for focusing and light metering, which
>happens before the sensor is read for the image, or the delay after
>taking the picture while the camera stores the image to memory card and
>recharges the flash (if used)? If the former, certainly there are many
>newer cameras where this is little, if any, longer than similar times
>for film cameras, and if the latter, then many cameras will allow
>multiple shots to an internal buffer (mine allows 6 at highest
>resolution), but flash recharge affects ALL cameras.


 
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John
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      06-29-2004
"Kayla" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture that
> I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and then
> the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a parade.
> I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by the time
> the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in the
> picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am wanting
> to get a new one.
>
> Lori


I had the same concerns with my Sony DSC-P1 (had at least a 1/2 second delay
on shutter and a 5 second recycle time before ready to take another
picture). I recently purchased a Nikon D70 which takes the picture at the
exact same time I press the shutter release (or at least close enough I
can't tell the difference) and can save up to four 6-megapixel JPG images
per SECOND. The D70 may be more than you want to spend, but the newer
generation of digital cameras tend to be much faster than earlier
generations, so I'd suggest going to a store where you can test out a few
and see what suits you best. Good luck!

- John


 
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David J Taylor
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      06-29-2004
"Don F" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:z7eEc.33343$cj3.18711@lakeread01...
[]
> It appears, from your post, that you have an older digital camera. I
> have Coolpix 950. I watch an hour glass (in the display) blink for 3 to

5
> seconds after taking a picture. Not acceptable at all.

[]
> Don F


On its successor - the Nikon Coolpix 990 - you can select to either have a
review delay or not (firmware V1.1). I don't know if there was an
equivalent firmware upgrade for the 950.

Cheers,
David


 
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Jeff Durham
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      06-29-2004
If I understand what you are saying, it's not the time that it takes to save
the picture, but rather the time it takes for the camera to actually take
the picture when the button is pushed. In a moving picture, you have to
snap the camera well ahead of the action in order for the picture to be
taken at the correct time.

Prior to depressing the button all the way, do you hold it halfway down to
compose the shot and the press it the rest of the way to take the picture?
I never noticed this problem with my Kodak DC240 as long as I composed the
picture by depressing the shutter button halfway first.

Jeff


"Kayla" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.
>
> Lori



 
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Gorf
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      06-29-2004
> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking the
> picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.


Try pushing the shutter button halfway down to set the exposure and focus.
Keep it there until you have the shot you want, then push it all the way
down.


 
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Gisle Hannemyr
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      06-29-2004
Kayla <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>> Kayla wrote:


>>> Is there a digital camera that doesn't have a delay after taking
>>> the picture. I have lost many good pictures because of this.


> Sorry. I worded that wrong. It's when I want to take a picture
> that I have the problem. I click and nothing happens for a bit and
> then the camera takes the picture. Very annoying especially at a
> parade. I have to point the camera just ahead of the subject so by
> the time the camera goes off hopefully the subject will still be in
> the picture. I have an Olympus D-460 which I really like but I am
> wanting to get a new one.


This is known as shutter lag and affects digital compacts (some
more than others)

There exist digital cameras without (perceptible) shutter delay.
These cameras belong to the class of cameras called "DSLR". They are
generally larger and heavier than compacts and the budget versions
(Canon Digital Rebel and Nikon D70) cost from around $900.
A word of warning: Moving from a D-460 will be a big step, and if
what you basically is after is a P&S camera, a DSLR is probably not
what you want.

Back to compacts: I have never used the D-460, but it is quite old, so
it I would guess that if you bought a current compact digital camera,
you would find that it was much faster that your Oly D-460. Note: It
still would have a shutter delay - but maybe so short that you could
live with it. You should check out tests - many measure and list
shutter lag along with other technical details of the camera under
review. DPreview http://www.depreview.com/ is an excellent resource
for this.

There are also some "tricks" you can use with modern compacts to
minimize shutter lag:

Half-press trick: Press shutter halfway down to pre-focus on the
subject. This works on most modern compacts.

Hyperfocal distance trick: Switch to manual, zoom out to wide angle
and stop down to f/5.6 or f/8, and preset focus to the hyperfocal
distance (on a G5 at 7.2mm, f/5.6 the hyperfocal distance is 5.1
feet - giving you a DOF from 2.5 feet to infinity!) You need
to have a camera with manual controls to do this.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
================================================== ======================
«To live outside the law, you must be honest.» (Bob Dylan)
 
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