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Any suggestions on keeping camera steady without a tripod?

 
 
David Dyer-Bennet
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      06-29-2004
"Ed" <ekirstein_atcatskill.net> writes:

> One little trick I have learned is, if I'm using the lcd rather than the
> viewfinder, have a neck strap on the camera and hold the camera out in front
> of your face till the neck strap is pulled tight against the back of your
> neck. That helps me a lot with my kind of shakey hands.


Yes, this works *amazingly* well. I was really startled when I began
noticing how low I could go in shutter speed and still get sharp
pictures using this technique.

Pull your elbows in to your belly, push out against the strap around
your neck, and you've got a really solid platform.

Doesn't work, unfortunately, with my Fuji S2, which (being a DSLR)
doesn't have live preview on the LCD.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <(E-Mail Removed)>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
 
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David Dyer-Bennet
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      06-29-2004
Ron Hunter <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> Ed wrote:
>> One little trick I have learned is, if I'm using the lcd rather than the
>> viewfinder, have a neck strap on the camera and hold the camera out in front
>> of your face till the neck strap is pulled tight against the back of your
>> neck. That helps me a lot with my kind of shakey hands.


> And if possible, avoid using the LCD this way. Just holding the
> camera firmly against the head adds about a 10 lb. mass and its
> inertia to the system, providing a LOT of steadiness.


My experience is that using the technique Ed described is *far* more
stable than pulling the camera in to my face (as measured by how low a
shutter speed I can use without getting visible blur from camera
shake).

The technique ties the camera to the entire upper body, instead of
just the head. And pulling it up to your head gives problems with
curved vs. flat surfaces not mating right, whereas the hands hold the
camera solidly and the strap meets your neck well, giving a much more
solid connection.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <(E-Mail Removed)>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/> <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
 
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Rik
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      06-29-2004
Another suggestion.

Use a chainpod.
A piece of chain has a screw at one end which is fixed to the camera.
The other end is dropped on the ground and the user places his foot on it.
By pressing the camera upwards the chain tautens and holds the camera
steady.

Good luck.

Rik



<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) .net...
> Hello all,
> When it comes to photography, I'm am below a rank amateur but keep
> practicing and am learning to use Photoshop quite well !
>
> My problem is my inability to keep the camera steady. I have the Rebel
> 300D and love the results but there is the "user operator" error that
> can't be solved by taking back the user!
>
> So any suggestions on how to keep steady when taking photos, especially
> in low light situations? I have ordered the EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
> and a friend said he'd lend me his EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM so I
> hope that the IS might help.
>
> Thanks for your help
>
> Paula Sims
> http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)





 
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leo
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      06-29-2004
"Alfred Molon" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) ...
> (E-Mail Removed) <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >Hello all,
> >When it comes to photography, I'm am below a rank amateur but keep
> >practicing and am learning to use Photoshop quite well !
> >
> >My problem is my inability to keep the camera steady. I have the Rebel
> >300D and love the results but there is the "user operator" error that
> >can't be solved by taking back the user!
> >
> >So any suggestions on how to keep steady when taking photos, especially
> >in low light situations? I have ordered the EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
> >and a friend said he'd lend me his EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM so I
> >hope that the IS might help.

>
> F3.5-5.6 is a very "dark" zoom lens. It may be cheaper than a brighter
> one, but it certainly doesn't help you in low light. See if you can find
> a zoom lens with an aperture larger than F3 at the tele end.
> --
>
> Alfred Molon



The same reason I decided not to buy the Canon 70-200 f/4 lens, despite of
it's very good optic. If there were an IS version. I'd grab it right away. I
bought the 300 f/4 IS. I'm very happy with it.


 
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this old user
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      06-29-2004

"Brian C. Baird" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed).. .
> In article <1NgEc.19545$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> (E-Mail Removed) says...
> > > Good move. If I'm half careful I can shoot at 1/6 second with mine,

my
> > > walkaround lens. A friend is on his third 28-135 IS, not because they
> > > are defective but because he has worn two of them out.

> >
> > How does one wear out a lens?

>
> Juggling will do them in pretty quickly.


How about using them to move furniture?


 
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Ron Hunter
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      06-29-2004
Don Stauffer wrote:
> Why do you reject the idea of a tripod? Modern tripods are compact,
> light, and compared to the past, relatively inexpensive now.
>


I don't know about others, but if the camera doesn't fit in my pocket, I
won't use it. Know of any pocketable tripods?

 
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Ron Hunter
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      06-29-2004
Jonathan Wilson wrote:

> On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 12:52:39 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>>>>...
>>>>
>>>
>>>A good idea for shooting pictures of inanimate objects, dangerous for
>>>living creatures.

>>
>> It is best used with inanimate objects for practice. Once you have the
>>technique down you don't need the pen and can use it on any object. You are
>>right that it is a good idea to avoid using any of those lasers near living
>>creatures. They may not be as dangerous as some would suggest, but there is
>>still some danger so take care.

>
>
> Probably not a good idea to use a red lazer pen when taking photos of
> important people, that red dot does tend to freak out the body guards,
> lol.
>
> Actually I'll confess at this point, I have no idea if a real lazer
> guided site on a rifle or gun makes an obvious red dot, especially one
> as large as tends to be used for show in films... Perhaps its me, but
> suddenly having a red dot flying arround rather gives the game away
> that someone is aiming at you.
>
> Oh well, lol.
>

I am pretty sure that a red dot focused on my chest would freak me out.
 
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RobbH
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      06-29-2004
On Tue, 29 Jun 2004 03:54:23 -0500, Ron Hunter wrote:

> Ed wrote:
>> One little trick I have learned is, if I'm using the lcd rather than the
>> viewfinder, have a neck strap on the camera and hold the camera out in front
>> of your face till the neck strap is pulled tight against the back of your
>> neck. That helps me a lot with my kind of shakey hands.
>>
>> Good luck,
>> Ed
>>

....
> And if possible, avoid using the LCD this way. Just holding the camera
> firmly against the head adds about a 10 lb. mass and its inertia to the
> system, providing a LOT of steadiness.


Ron, I have to disagree with this. I see this assertion made often. The
book, "Digital Camera Hacks," states it succinctly: "...it's harder to
steady the camera during exposure at arm's length." In the absence of any
other factors, that's probably true. But, like Ed, I find I can hold a
camera much more steadily by using a combination of strap tension and arm
bracing. Held up to the eye, the camera has only a single column of
vertical support, with very limited assistance from some extra vertical
bracing at the top of the column; using strap tension adds horizontal and
vertical bracing and reduces sway in the upper portion of the vertical
column.

Of course, it may well be that I can do better with the LCD because I never
mastered the Leica grip, or because my eyeglasses prevent a good
camera/head meld. Whatever the reason, the LCD works better for me.

All this is irrelevant to the original poster, who has a 300D. One reason
I'm reluctant to dive into DSLRs is their inability to use the LCD as an
alternate finder.

 
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Ron Hunter
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      06-29-2004
David Dyer-Bennet wrote:

> Ron Hunter <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>
>
>>Ed wrote:
>>
>>>One little trick I have learned is, if I'm using the lcd rather than the
>>>viewfinder, have a neck strap on the camera and hold the camera out in front
>>>of your face till the neck strap is pulled tight against the back of your
>>>neck. That helps me a lot with my kind of shakey hands.

>
>
>>And if possible, avoid using the LCD this way. Just holding the
>>camera firmly against the head adds about a 10 lb. mass and its
>>inertia to the system, providing a LOT of steadiness.

>
>
> My experience is that using the technique Ed described is *far* more
> stable than pulling the camera in to my face (as measured by how low a
> shutter speed I can use without getting visible blur from camera
> shake).
>
> The technique ties the camera to the entire upper body, instead of
> just the head. And pulling it up to your head gives problems with
> curved vs. flat surfaces not mating right, whereas the hands hold the
> camera solidly and the strap meets your neck well, giving a much more
> solid connection.


Perhaps the point is that I won't use a camera with a strap. Can't
stand anything dangling around my neck. We use what we have. Works for me.
 
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Phil Wheeler
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      06-29-2004


David J Taylor wrote:
> "Don Stauffer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
>
>>Why do you reject the idea of a tripod? Modern tripods are compact,
>>light, and compared to the past, relatively inexpensive now.

>
>
> I reject a tripod because of the weight and inconvenience. Not quite the
> thing to take into a restaurant for dinner, nor will many museums,
> theatres etc. allow them.
>


Exactly. That's why IS lenses and/or high ISO (need dSLR to go real
high) is a good answer. Plus tripod is just more stuff to lug.

Hmmm .. wonder if a hiking stick monopod would make it into a museum? <g>

Phil

 
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