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Why go dSLR?

 
 
Jed Savage
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      06-23-2004
I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!
 
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Joseph Meehan
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      06-23-2004
Jed Savage wrote:
> I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
> Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
> thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
> resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
> and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
> ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
> change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
> question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
> non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
> but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
> SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
> dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
> probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
> click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
> be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
> examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!


Frankly nothing. Many digital cameras that are not called dSLR are in
fact dSL, (no R) and function in almost every way as a dSLR. The reflex
part allows a direct view through the lens as opposed to an electronic view
through the lens.

Most dSLRs are higher end cameras and have features and a quality level
that appeals to the more serious photographer, especially those coming from
a 35 mm tradition.

Rather than focusing on SLR or not SLR, I suggest you look for the
features, quality and feel that work for you and don't limit your choices by
worrying about the classification.

Changing lenses 35 years ago was very important. Good quality zoom
lenses were either very expensive or extremely expensive. Today that is not
the case and good (I did not say great, but good enough) quality wide range
zoom lenses are the norm. Today the ability to change lenses is meaningless
to 95% of the users.

Good Luck

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math



 
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Jeff Durham
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      06-23-2004
If you are interested in pictures at a family outing, stick with a point and
shoot digital camera. If you are interested in a wide range of photography
(landscapes, fireworks, portraits, closeups of insects, flowers, ...), get
an SLR. For instance, with portraits, you may want to blur the background
of your subject. This is easy with an SLR by opening the aperture (lowering
the f/stop number).

The Canon Digital Rebel 300D and the Nikon D70 are great entry level DSLRs.
Check out this online Canon workshop for their DSLRs:
http://www.photoworkshop.com/canon/lessons_1-5.html

If you are interested in doing those types of things, then you want a DSLR.

Jeff


"Jed Savage" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
> Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
> thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
> resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
> and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
> ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
> change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
> question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
> non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
> but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
> SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
> dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
> probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
> click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
> be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
> examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!



 
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jean
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-23-2004
Also, if you want to shoot at ISO 400, 800 or even 1600 and still get a good
picture, go DSLR. The other advantage is the speed of operation. The
downside is learning to use it, learning to do some post processing and
looking like a geek when you carry it around.

Jean

Oh, I forgot, DSLRs are also heavier and more expensive, sometimes a LOT
more expensive. If you are afraid of losing money because they WILL lose
value, then just look at how much you car's value has gone down, that makes
a DSLR is easier to justify. I spend more time on my computers and with my
cameras than in my car.

"Jeff Durham" <(E-Mail Removed)> a écrit dans le message de
news:IzhCc.146993$(E-Mail Removed)...
> If you are interested in pictures at a family outing, stick with a point

and
> shoot digital camera. If you are interested in a wide range of

photography
> (landscapes, fireworks, portraits, closeups of insects, flowers, ...), get
> an SLR. For instance, with portraits, you may want to blur the background
> of your subject. This is easy with an SLR by opening the aperture

(lowering
> the f/stop number).
>
> The Canon Digital Rebel 300D and the Nikon D70 are great entry level

DSLRs.
> Check out this online Canon workshop for their DSLRs:
> http://www.photoworkshop.com/canon/lessons_1-5.html
>
> If you are interested in doing those types of things, then you want a

DSLR.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> "Jed Savage" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> > I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
> > Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
> > thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
> > resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
> > and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
> > ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
> > change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
> > question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
> > non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
> > but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
> > SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
> > dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
> > probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
> > click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
> > be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
> > examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!

>
>



 
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Phil Wheeler
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      06-23-2004


Joseph Meehan wrote:

>>Can anyone give me some
>>examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!

>
>
> Frankly nothing. Many digital cameras that are not called dSLR are in
> fact dSL, (no R) and function in almost every way as a dSLR. The reflex
> part allows a direct view through the lens as opposed to an electronic view
> through the lens.


Surprising reply, "Frankly nothing". There are some significant
advantages to dSLR (not all related to the S or the L or the R).

o Larger focal planes allow shooting at ISOs up to 1600: Great for many
situations I've been in. Few if any non dSLRs can go to ISO 400 without
unacceptable noise.

o Interchangable lenses allow more zoom range without loss of quality --
and the use of image stabilization (available on only two P&S that I
know of)

o Lenses are generally much higher in quality (but there are exceptions).

o Generally more creative options.

o Though the lens "what you see is what you get" composition. Can use
the LCD on many non-dSLR cameras this way -- but seldom in bright light.
And their viewfinders (excepting those with EVF) are notoriously
inaccurate for composition.

Downsides of dSLR are size/wt and cost (300D with kit lens is $1000 but
no one is likely to stop with the kit lens, and really good lenses are
pricy).

Still and all, it really surprises me that someone will plunk down $1000
for a fancy P&S camera when they could buy an entry-level dSLR instead.
But maybe that's just me.

Phil

 
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Ron Hunter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-23-2004
Jed Savage wrote:
> I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
> Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
> thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
> resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
> and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
> ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
> change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
> question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
> non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
> but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
> SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
> dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
> probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
> click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
> be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
> examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!


Simply, if you don't know, you don't need one. But a good P&S, such as
the Kodak DX7440 and use it. If you find that there are things it won't
do that you want to do as you learn more about photography, THEN you
will have some idea of what you want a DSLR to do, and what it CAN do.
Buying ANY camera with your eyes closed, and no specific idea why you
are buying that one over another is probably going to be an unhappy
experience.
 
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Ron Hunter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-23-2004
Jeff Durham wrote:

> If you are interested in pictures at a family outing, stick with a point and
> shoot digital camera. If you are interested in a wide range of photography
> (landscapes, fireworks, portraits, closeups of insects, flowers, ...), get
> an SLR. For instance, with portraits, you may want to blur the background
> of your subject. This is easy with an SLR by opening the aperture (lowering
> the f/stop number).


That is also easy with the better P&S digitals. The DSLR 'thing' is
changeable lenses. Even the old advantage of through the lens viewing
is lost to P&S digitals.

>
> The Canon Digital Rebel 300D and the Nikon D70 are great entry level DSLRs.
> Check out this online Canon workshop for their DSLRs:
> http://www.photoworkshop.com/canon/lessons_1-5.html
>
> If you are interested in doing those types of things, then you want a DSLR.
>
> Jeff
>
>
> "Jed Savage" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
>
>>I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
>>Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
>>thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
>>resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
>>and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
>>ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
>>change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
>>question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
>>non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
>>but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
>>SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
>>dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
>>probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
>>click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
>>be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
>>examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!

>
>
>

 
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papenfussDIESPAM@juneauDOTmeDOTvt.edu
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      06-23-2004
jean <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: Also, if you want to shoot at ISO 400, 800 or even 1600 and still get a good
: picture, go DSLR. The other advantage is the speed of operation. The
: downside is learning to use it, learning to do some post processing and
: looking like a geek when you carry it around.

...and of course expense. Honestly, most of the mid-range and higher point
and shoot digital cameras will allow manual control of exposure. The real differences
are (as people have mentioned):

- Interchangeable lenses: Not *as* important as once upon a time, but still necessary
to do a wide range (think wildlife closeups vs landscapes)

- High sensitivity: There's more to a digital camera than megapixels. A point and
shoot may have as many megapixels as a DSLR, but they're usually packed into a (much)
smaller area. That means less light per individual pixel, so the signal (and
consequently noise) is amplified more. That results in a lot of digital noise on
high ISO photos

If you don't know anything about what I just mentioned, I'd recommend getting
a $200-$300 point and shoot. Should be mid-range enough to see if you like it, but
still much cheaper (less than half) of a low-end DSLR.

-Cory


--
************************************************** ***********************
* The prime directive of Linux: *
* - learn what you don't know, *
* - teach what you do. *
* (Just my 20 USm$) *
************************************************** ***********************

 
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Chuck
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      06-23-2004

> and the use of image stabilization (available on only two P&S that I
> know of)


Canon S1 IS
Minolta A1 and A2
Panasonic FZ2 and FZ10 (and before the end of the year , Panasonic will have
a new one with 6mp that they will also sell on the OEM market).

And I forgot the name of an old one, the UZ I think Not sure.


 
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Gene Palmiter
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      06-23-2004
If you don't have a reason to get a dslr instead of a point and
shoot....don't get one. Wait until the lack of options with the P&S gets in
the way of being creative.


"Jed Savage" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> I've had a sanyo vpc-x360 for about 4-5 years that I've been using.
> Aside from resolution, it's been an ok camera for me. I've been
> thinking of going to a 4 or 5 mega-pixel camera tho as I'd like more
> resolution. I went into the electronic shop here and started browsing
> and I saw the dSLR cameras. I thought they were cool because of the
> ability to change lenses (though I don't know why I'd ever need to
> change lens), and I'm thinking of getting a dSLR my next buy. My
> question is really what benefits do the dSLR cameras have over
> non-SLR? I've heard that they offer the shooter more creative control
> but I'm not quite sure exactly what that means. Why would one need an
> SLR? What types of settings am I going to be able to tweak with on
> dSLR camera that will make much difference in my photos? As you can
> probably tell I'm not very schooled on photography beyond point &
> click cameras, I just don't want to buy a standard digital camera and
> be wishing later that I would have gone dSLR. Can anyone give me some
> examples of when a dSLR camera would come in handy? Thanks!



 
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