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Newbie to group -- Hello -- Owner of Kodak DX6340

 
 
Midnight Moocher
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      05-11-2004
Hi.

Back a couple of months ago I bought a Kodak DX6340. It's a great little camera.

I most often use the Automatic setting whilst taking pictures, but am now looking into
other features it offers.

The camera offers a PAS mode.

Can someone tell me how exposure compensation, aperture compensation and shutter
speed are supposed to effect an image?

Also, why would I want to select the picture quality option of 'Best (3:2)' over 'Best'?
Is this something to do with 3:2 offering a better size for printing?

Thanks.


 
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Jim Townsend
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      05-11-2004
Midnight Moocher wrote:

> Hi.
>
> Back a couple of months ago I bought a Kodak DX6340. It's a great little camera.
>
> I most often use the Automatic setting whilst taking pictures, but am now looking into
> other features it offers.
>
> The camera offers a PAS mode.
>
> Can someone tell me how exposure compensation, aperture compensation and shutter
> speed are supposed to effect an image?


Positive (+) compensation makes your images lighter. This is handy for when
you're shooting an object where there is lots of bright backlighting (like sky).
Positive compensation prevents whatever your shooting from becoming a solid
black silhouette.

Negative compensation (-) makes your images darker. You'd use this when shooting a
small bright object with a large dark background. This compensation prevents the
object from being an overexposed bright blur.

> Also, why would I want to select the picture quality option of 'Best (3:2)' over 'Best'?
> Is this something to do with 3:2 offering a better size for printing?


Your camera normally produces a 4:3 image. (Fits most TV screens and computer monitors).

For printing 6" x 4" images, you have to crop a bit off the top and bottom of a 4:3 image..
By selecting 3:2, your camera does this for you at the time of shooting..


 
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Midnight Moocher
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      05-11-2004
> > Can someone tell me how exposure compensation, aperture compensation and shutter
> > speed are supposed to effect an image?

>
> Positive (+) compensation makes your images lighter. This is handy for when
> you're shooting an object where there is lots of bright backlighting (like sky).
> Positive compensation prevents whatever your shooting from becoming a solid
> black silhouette.
>
> Negative compensation (-) makes your images darker. You'd use this when shooting a
> small bright object with a large dark background. This compensation prevents the
> object from being an overexposed bright blur.
>
> > Also, why would I want to select the picture quality option of 'Best (3:2)' over 'Best'?
> > Is this something to do with 3:2 offering a better size for printing?

>
> Your camera normally produces a 4:3 image. (Fits most TV screens and computer monitors).
>
> For printing 6" x 4" images, you have to crop a bit off the top and bottom of a 4:3 image..
> By selecting 3:2, your camera does this for you at the time of shooting..
>


Great explanation. Thanks very much for that.

One more question. The shutter speed. The deafult setting is 1/60. This can be increased several times up to 1/2000, or decreased to
4.0". Many options in between. What would be an example of increasing/decreasing the shutter speed?



 
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Dano
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      05-12-2004

>
> One more question. The shutter speed. The deafult setting is 1/60. This

can be increased several times up to 1/2000, or decreased to
> 4.0". Many options in between. What would be an example of

increasing/decreasing the shutter speed?


Your camera shouldn't have a "default " shutter speed setting. It should
determine the best shutter speed given the available lighting etc. and
change according to the situation. You would use a fast shutter speed
(1/2000) under very brightly lit conditions where you want to freeze that
action. A sports scene outside on a bright sunny day for example. A slow
shutter speed would be used when there is not enough available light for
proper exposure. Any night time shooting is a good example. It can also be
used to try and add motion to a picture. Using a sports scene for an example
again, using a slow shutter speed of a speeding race car would result in a
blurred effect giving the picture the feeling of speed. Hope this makes
sense and is of some help...


 
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Midnight Moocher
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      05-12-2004
"Dano" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:d1eoc.448715$oR5.160428@pd7tw3no...
> Your camera shouldn't have a "default " shutter speed setting. It should
> determine the best shutter speed given the available lighting etc. and
> change according to the situation. You would use a fast shutter speed
> (1/2000) under very brightly lit conditions where you want to freeze that
> action. A sports scene outside on a bright sunny day for example. A slow
> shutter speed would be used when there is not enough available light for
> proper exposure. Any night time shooting is a good example. It can also be
> used to try and add motion to a picture. Using a sports scene for an example
> again, using a slow shutter speed of a speeding race car would result in a
> blurred effect giving the picture the feeling of speed. Hope this makes
> sense and is of some help...


Thanks. It did help.

I will be going to an Airshow soon. Assuming it's a sunny day, I guess if I where to go into PAS mode.
I would set the shutter fairly high (not looking for blurred effect) and possibly a higher than usual exposure.


 
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Ron Baird
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      05-13-2004
Greetings Midnight,

PAS stands for 'Program,' 'Aperture,' and 'Shutter' and allows you to
control the settings for more creative control. A very nice feature.

The camera uses an ElectroMechanical Shutter/Aperture. Essentially a
diaphragm that will open and close at the correct F/stop (aperture or
opening) and time (Shutter) based on the computation of the cameras
calculation of the scene, lighting, and ISO setting. The camera allows
you to set one or the other as a priority. For example, if you use Program,
the camera will adjust on its own to compensate. If you use the aperture
setting, you can select the aperture to one of the listed options on the LCD
display and the camera will stay at that aperture while adjusting the
shutter etc. to make up the difference. It is vice versa for shutter
priority. Please review the link below for details on the PAS feature of
your camera.

As you will note, your particular camera allows for an aperture setting.
They change from wide to telephoto due to the shift in the lens and the
effective aperture that results from that change.

wide - f/2.2-5.6; tele - f/4.8-13

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/servi...0132c2s3.jhtml

Enjoy, Midnight, as the camera can actually do a lot. If you have any
questions, let me know.

Ron Baird
Eastman Kodak Company

"Midnight Moocher" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hi.
>
> Back a couple of months ago I bought a Kodak DX6340. It's a great little

camera.
>
> I most often use the Automatic setting whilst taking pictures, but am now

looking into
> other features it offers.
>
> The camera offers a PAS mode.
>
> Can someone tell me how exposure compensation, aperture compensation and

shutter
> speed are supposed to effect an image?
>
> Also, why would I want to select the picture quality option of 'Best

(3:2)' over 'Best'?
> Is this something to do with 3:2 offering a better size for printing?
>
> Thanks.
>
>



 
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