Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > DSLR's in a high humidty environment.

Reply
Thread Tools

DSLR's in a high humidty environment.

 
 
Bugsy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004
Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?

I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?

I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses

Dave


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
????
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004
On Sat, 8 May 2004 08:13:08 +0000 (UTC), "Bugsy"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?
>
>I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
>I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
>there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?
>
>I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses
>
>Dave
>


took my eos 300d to tropical world (local hothouse exhibit) outside
temp cold wet rainy 12 deg centigrade inside warm wet humid 31 deg
cent
lens misted up while taking shots however given 2 secs to aclimatise
and lens cleared got some good shots after appeared fine
might be worth taking some silica gel just in case it does fog up
jim
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
David Kilpatrick
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004


Bugsy wrote:

> Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?
>
> I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
> I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
> there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?
>
> I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses
>



I have had problems in butterfly farms and tropical enclosures.
Basically you must get the entire camera up to temperature before going
in. Even if you do not remove the lens, most zooms 'suck' air into the
darkchamber of the camera, and moisture may condense on inner glass
surfaces of the lens, or the cover glass of the CCD.

Even a sealed-unit camera like the Minolta 7/A series, because it has a
mechanically extending zoom, will draw external air into the system if
you zoom the lens. A very few sealed cameras (such as Minolta's Xt etc
with an internally zooming lens and no extension) are safer than others
when moving from cold to high humidity warm conditions.

I have found it takes 30 minutes for a camera to adjust externally
(outer lens face) to high humidity 30+ degrees C conditions when moving
in from 20C conditions (which will be the case when leaving air
conditioning to go outside in Florida). The answer is to keep the camera
bag on top of a warm surface, such as part of an aircon system or fridge
which emits warm air, so that it's much warmer than your surroundings.
When visiting a butterfly farm here (the only time we get these
conditions in Scotland!) I will place the camera bag in the car footwell
and turn the heating on, and give the camera a thorough warm-up for the
duration of the drive.

Then, by getting into the humid warm conditions quickly before it has
cooled down, the risk of condensation is almost eliminated. Even so, I
do no change lenses once in such conditions - with any camera.

David

 
Reply With Quote
 
Chris Brown
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004
In article <c7i4qk$52h$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Bugsy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?


I've used DSLRs in tropical greenhouses (specifically, the tropical zone of
the Eden Project in Cornwall, UK, which is, I believe, the biggest
greenhouse in the World), and real tropical rainforest. The former took half
an hour of acclimatisation before I could take any pictures, due to
condensation (camera was fine though). The latter required taking some care
with the camera (a D30) because being a rainforest, it was raining, a lot.

>I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
>I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
>there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?


That didn't seem to be a problem in my case. YMMV.
 
Reply With Quote
 
George Preddy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004
"Bugsy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<c7i4qk$52h$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?
>
> I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
> I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
> there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?
>
> I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses


Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
lens is off. Cheaply built Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Kodak, and Fuji
DSLRs do not. Sigma's build quality is a solid cut above all others.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Bart van der Wolf
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004

"George Preddy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
SNIP
> > I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses

>
> Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
> lens is off.


Air tight, so the factory installed dust cannot escape.

Bart

 
Reply With Quote
 
David Kilpatrick
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004


George Preddy wrote:

> "Bugsy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<c7i4qk$52h$(E-Mail Removed)>...
>
>>Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?
>>
>>I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
>>I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
>>there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?
>>
>>I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses

>
>
> Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
> lens is off. Cheaply built Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Kodak, and Fuji
> DSLRs do not. Sigma's build quality is a solid cut above all others.


It is not hermetically sealed, and humid air can enter the chamber
behing it. It would be a slight barrier. However, it might actually mist
up right behind the lens. I'm going to be very careful when using the
SD-10 in those conditions, perhaps even more so than with a regular SLR.

David

 
Reply With Quote
 
Jukka-Pekka Suominen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-08-2004
Bart van der Wolf wrote:

> "George Preddy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message


>>Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
>>lens is off.

>
>
> Air tight, so the factory installed dust cannot escape.


I suppose it's done so that the magic smoke can't escape from the sensor...

-JP

 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark M
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2004

"Jukka-Pekka Suominen" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:409d4e85$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Bart van der Wolf wrote:
>
> > "George Preddy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

>
> >>Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
> >>lens is off.

> >
> >
> > Air tight, so the factory installed dust cannot escape.

>
> I suppose it's done so that the magic smoke can't escape from the

sensor...

It's actually referred to as "pixel dust."
-Similar to "pixie dust," but only for photographic uses in otherwise crappy
cameras.


 
Reply With Quote
 
George Preddy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      05-09-2004
David Kilpatrick <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<c7jhe7$p7r$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> George Preddy wrote:
>
> > "Bugsy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<c7i4qk$52h$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> >
> >>Has anyone had experience of taking a DSLR to such an environment?
> >>
> >>I ask because when I used to take my old 35mm SLR to somewhere like Florida
> >>I used to have trouble with the mirror misting up when changing lenses, Is
> >>there a poss that in a DSLR the sensor will "mist up"?
> >>
> >>I guess the risk is reduced somewhat if you don't change lenses

> >
> >
> > Not at all, Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber even when the
> > lens is off. Cheaply built Canon, Nikon, Pentax, Kodak, and Fuji
> > DSLRs do not. Sigma's build quality is a solid cut above all others.

>
> It is not hermetically sealed, and humid air can enter the chamber
> behing it. It would be a slight barrier. However, it might actually mist
> up right behind the lens. I'm going to be very careful when using the
> SD-10 in those conditions, perhaps even more so than with a regular SLR.


Sigma DSLRs have a sealed sensor chamber, none of the other DSLRs do.
This is a major build quality advantage. Do with it what you like.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Motivating high-school students to join college after completing high school m1@mailinator.com Computer Support 4 08-13-2007 04:00 AM
High Def Brings High Sales Hopes. Allan DVD Video 59 08-08-2005 06:03 PM
Looking for high-end 18- or 19-inch flat panels with high resolution. KL234 Digital Photography 6 02-26-2004 08:18 PM
USB High Speed against USB Non High Speed DannyD1355 Computer Support 1 09-07-2003 02:59 AM



Advertisments