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routing camera through coaxial cable

 
 
Ivan
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      04-20-2004
I have coaxial cable running all through the house. I can make any
combination of connections I want. Is it possible to have a camera (in my
case a vhs cam) connected to my capture device via the coaxial cable in my
house?
My reason for doing this is simple, to allow distant family to be closer to
the action.
Ivan


 
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Ivan
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      04-20-2004
I'm sorry, I thought I was in "uk.rec.video.digital". This is probably not
the best NG to ask that question.
Ivan

> I have coaxial cable running all through the house. I can make any
> combination of connections I want. Is it possible to have a camera (in my
> case a vhs cam) connected to my capture device via the coaxial cable in my



 
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Ian Stirling
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      04-20-2004
Ivan <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I have coaxial cable running all through the house. I can make any
> combination of connections I want. Is it possible to have a camera (in my
> case a vhs cam) connected to my capture device via the coaxial cable in my
> house?
> My reason for doing this is simple, to allow distant family to be closer to
> the action.


Yes, just connect the connectors, it should just work.
Add UHF modulators, and you can even do multiple cameras.
 
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Dave Martindale
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      04-20-2004
"Ivan" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
>I have coaxial cable running all through the house. I can make any
>combination of connections I want. Is it possible to have a camera (in my
>case a vhs cam) connected to my capture device via the coaxial cable in my
>house?


The coaxial cable you have is probably 75 ohm TV RF cabling. If you
connect a RF modulator to your camera and a TV set to the other end,
this should work fine over any reasonable distance. You can also run
the signal through a conventional splitter and feed several TV sets.

You might *also* be able to connect a camera composite output directly
to the cable without the modulator, and connect the far end to the video
in jack of the TV instead of the antenna jack. That will work over
short distances, but may have problems with long distances. (Some TV
coax is not intended for baseband video; the centre conductor is
copper-plated steel rather than solid or stranded copper). You also
can't use a standard splitter, though you could use a multi-output video
amplifier.

In the case of a computer video digitizer, the first paragraph above
applies if it has a tuner input, and the second if it has a direct
video input. Just replace "TV" with "digitizer".

Dave
 
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