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I don't want to mess up

 
 
Mike
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
Hi
I am new to digital images.
I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
I know it may not be the best in the world.
But is is what I have. I am about to start to
scan and archive all my analog photos.
I have photos of every size, also negatives of
every size and some slides. this scanner has many
different slide-negative holders, etc for that.

Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
that I should have done something differently,
After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
scan to work with.

My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
scanning as far as DPI goes.

I would welcome any tips from the group.

Thanks Mike



 
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Lucas Tam
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
"Mike" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:TxA0c.34563$(E-Mail Removed)-
kc.rr.com:

> My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
> for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
> for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
> scanning as far as DPI goes.


Depends on what you intend to do.

If you scan all your photos at 300dpi, you'll end up with good prints at
1:1 size. However, if you intend on blowing up smaller prints, you may want
to scan those prints at 600dpi or higher thus giving you more pixels to
work with.

Scanning is VERY tedious and time consuming. I pity you ; )

--
Lucas Tam ((E-Mail Removed))
Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
 
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Lionel
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
Kibo informs me that "Mike" <(E-Mail Removed)> stated that:

>My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
>for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
>for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
>scanning as far as DPI goes.


Unfortunately, there's no simple answer to your question, as it totally
depends on what you want to do with each image. For a couple of
examples; if you just want to be able to reprint scanned prints at about
the same size on an inkjet printer, 200DPI @ 24 bits should be fine.
OTOH, if you want to print enlargements from scanned slides or neg's,
you would probably need to use the highest resolution that your scanner
is capable of, which will result in really enormous file sizes.

--
W
. | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
\|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
 
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Mark Herring
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
As others have said---it depends. You want a MINIMUM of 300PPI in the
largest print you ever intend to make....

Also---following the above statement, you'll need much more
resolution for negs thatn for prints.

If in doubt, scan at a higher resolution---memory is cheap.

On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 00:15:39 -0600, "Mike" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hi
>I am new to digital images.
>I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
>I know it may not be the best in the world.
>But is is what I have. I am about to start to
>scan and archive all my analog photos.
>I have photos of every size, also negatives of
>every size and some slides. this scanner has many
>different slide-negative holders, etc for that.
>
>Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
>DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
>that I should have done something differently,
>After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
>I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
>I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
>Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
>or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
>scan to work with.
>
>My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
>for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
>for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
>scanning as far as DPI goes.
>
>I would welcome any tips from the group.
>
>Thanks Mike
>
>


**************************
Mark Herring, Pasadena, Calif.
Private e-mail: Just say no to "No".

 
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Lionel
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
Kibo informs me that Mark Herring <(E-Mail Removed)> stated that:

>As others have said---it depends. You want a MINIMUM of 300PPI in the
>largest print you ever intend to make....
>
>Also---following the above statement, you'll need much more
>resolution for negs thatn for prints.
>
>If in doubt, scan at a higher resolution---memory is cheap.


As are DVD-R platters.

--
W
. | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
\|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------
 
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David Dyer-Bennet
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
Lionel <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

> Kibo informs me that "Mike" <(E-Mail Removed)> stated that:
>
>>My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
>>for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
>>for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
>>scanning as far as DPI goes.

>
> Unfortunately, there's no simple answer to your question, as it totally
> depends on what you want to do with each image. For a couple of
> examples; if you just want to be able to reprint scanned prints at about
> the same size on an inkjet printer, 200DPI @ 24 bits should be fine.
> OTOH, if you want to print enlargements from scanned slides or neg's,
> you would probably need to use the highest resolution that your scanner
> is capable of, which will result in really enormous file sizes.


I'd amend that very slightly -- the highest *real optical* resolution
that his scanner is capable of. Which, I'm sure, is what you mean;
but it's quite likely *NOT* the highest resolution number exhibited in
the interface; I very frequently see scanners let you let you select
"resolutions" that have no bearing on reality at all. (Perhaps the
Epson doesn't, but I've gotten in the habit of being careful when I
use the phrase "highest resolution" with regard to a scanner in
general.)
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <(E-Mail Removed)>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/>
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com> <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/>
Photos: <dd-b.lighthunters.net> Snapshots: <www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/>
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/>
 
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BillH
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
A good website to start with is:
http://www.scantips.com/

I also have the same scanner for archiving and for passing
on to the kids of relatives. I am scanning at 48-bit (color)
and 16-bit (b&w) so that I can adjust colors as best as
possible. In general I'm scanning at a high dpi so that
others can crop if they desire. The lowest I scan
is 400 dpi (color) & 800 (b&w). For prints smaller
than 4x6 I scan at higher dpi.

Mike wrote:

> Hi
> I am new to digital images.
> I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
> I know it may not be the best in the world.
> But is is what I have. I am about to start to
> scan and archive all my analog photos.
> I have photos of every size, also negatives of
> every size and some slides. this scanner has many
> different slide-negative holders, etc for that.
>
> Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
> DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
> that I should have done something differently,
> After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
> I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
> I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
> Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
> or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
> scan to work with.
>
> My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
> for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
> for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
> scanning as far as DPI goes.
>
> I would welcome any tips from the group.
>
> Thanks Mike


 
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Ron Hunter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
Mike wrote:

> Hi
> I am new to digital images.
> I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
> I know it may not be the best in the world.
> But is is what I have. I am about to start to
> scan and archive all my analog photos.
> I have photos of every size, also negatives of
> every size and some slides. this scanner has many
> different slide-negative holders, etc for that.
>
> Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
> DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
> that I should have done something differently,
> After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
> I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
> I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
> Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
> or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
> scan to work with.
>
> My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
> for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
> for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
> scanning as far as DPI goes.
>
> I would welcome any tips from the group.
>
> Thanks Mike
>
>
>

For prints, 300dpi. For negatives and slides, the highest optical
resolution available on your scanner.
 
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Ron Hunter
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004
BillH wrote:

> A good website to start with is:
> http://www.scantips.com/
>
> I also have the same scanner for archiving and for passing
> on to the kids of relatives. I am scanning at 48-bit (color)
> and 16-bit (b&w) so that I can adjust colors as best as
> possible. In general I'm scanning at a high dpi so that
> others can crop if they desire. The lowest I scan
> is 400 dpi (color) & 800 (b&w). For prints smaller
> than 4x6 I scan at higher dpi.
>
> Mike wrote:
>
>
>>Hi
>>I am new to digital images.
>>I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
>>I know it may not be the best in the world.
>>But is is what I have. I am about to start to
>>scan and archive all my analog photos.
>>I have photos of every size, also negatives of
>>every size and some slides. this scanner has many
>>different slide-negative holders, etc for that.
>>
>>Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
>>DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
>>that I should have done something differently,
>>After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
>>I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
>>I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
>>Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
>>or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
>>scan to work with.
>>
>>My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
>>for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
>>for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
>>scanning as far as DPI goes.
>>
>>I would welcome any tips from the group.
>>
>>Thanks Mike

>
>

You are wasting time and storage space. Read www.scantips.com for
complete explanation.
 
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mark_digital
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-01-2004

"Mike" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:TxA0c.34563$(E-Mail Removed)-kc.rr.com...
> Hi
> I am new to digital images.
> I just bought an epson 3200 photo scanner.
> I know it may not be the best in the world.
> But is is what I have. I am about to start to
> scan and archive all my analog photos.
> I have photos of every size, also negatives of
> every size and some slides. this scanner has many
> different slide-negative holders, etc for that.
>
> Because I will be scanning a few thousand images, I want to choose a good
> DPI to scan these in. I do not want to discover
> that I should have done something differently,
> After I scanned in hundreds of pictures.
> I just want to get the raw stock onto cd,s
> I can retouch, edit, crop, or whatever later on.
> Or maybe never.. But if I want to print, enlarge
> or whatever later on , I want to have a good quality
> scan to work with.
>
> My question to the group is, Is there a good setting
> for all my scans, or must I change the scan settings
> for each picture ? And what would be overkill for
> scanning as far as DPI goes.
>
> I would welcome any tips from the group.
>
> Thanks Mike
>
>
>


Digitizing your photos is a good excuse to bring them out of storage and
enjoy them.
Wear cotton gloves while handling them.
Decide on a naming convention for categorizing.
Disposable whiffers for general dusting are excellent at cleaning fine
particles from
the scanner glass. They're very gentle.



 
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