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Best file format to edit

 
 
Neal Matthis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-27-2003
What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing it
with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can capture
in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the other
CRW. So I really have two questions:

1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format should I
convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images, so the
JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data that was
lost due to the JPG compression.

2) For my CRW files, until I get the RAW image plug-in for Photoshop, I will
have to convert them to something else. What should I convert to? I have
the option of JPG, 8bit/channel TIFF and 16bit/channel TIFF. Even if I
select TIFF, should I then convert to something else that's better for
editing? Thanks.


 
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Povl H. Pedersen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-27-2003
On 2003-12-27, Neal Matthis <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing it
> with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can capture
> in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the other
> CRW. So I really have two questions:
>
> 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format should I
> convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images, so the
> JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
> converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data that was
> lost due to the JPG compression.


Each time you save a jpeg, it is recompressed. So you will lose
quality after each editing. So save in TIFF or Photoshop format.

> 2) For my CRW files, until I get the RAW image plug-in for Photoshop, I will
> have to convert them to something else. What should I convert to? I have
> the option of JPG, 8bit/channel TIFF and 16bit/channel TIFF. Even if I
> select TIFF, should I then convert to something else that's better for
> editing? Thanks.


TIFF is lossless, even with compression. So stick to that or Phtoshop
native.
>

 
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Jim Townsend
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-27-2003
Neal Matthis wrote:

> What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing it
> with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can capture
> in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the other
> CRW. So I really have two questions:


Depends what you mean by best.. RAW gives you the most versatility, but it's
also more work. If you enjoy spending time in front of your computer monitor,
have lots of hard disk space and have lots of cash for flash memory, go for
RAW.

JPEG is OK too.. I use JPEG myself most of the time. (But I *do* use RAW, I'm
not discounting it). It all depends..

Whether you use JPEG or RAW... Always keep your original untouched. If you're
editing an original JPEG file, use the [save as] feature.. Don't save over top
of the original or the 'negative' will be lost.

> 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format should I
> convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images, so the
> JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
> converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data that was
> lost due to the JPG compression.


Y'know what.. One JPEG save to a second generation doesn't do that much. I
can't tell the difference.. However, before you do this, try it yourself.

Otherwise, if you've got *lots* of disk space, save as TIFF. That way you
don't recompress and lose data. Tiff is also good if you plan on opening and
modifying the file several times.. The 3rd and subsequent savings start
showing enough artifacts that an old set of blind eyes like me can see 'em.

 
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Neal Matthis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2003
Thank for the reply. I did a little searching on the newsgroup and found a
link to a website that explained JPG, PNG, TIF and GIF. I never knew that
GIFs were 8-bit color only. It also explained color spaces a little. The
site said the same thing as you; use TIFF if you can spare the disk space.
I do have a lot of disk space, so I'll probably stick with TIFF then make a
JPEG copy when I want to share or email them.

The only other question I have regarding CRW files (Canon RAW), is whether I
should go ahead and immediately convert them to TIFF or leave them in CRW
format with the Photoshop RAW plugin? My Digital Rebel came with software
that can read the CRW files and can change the contrast, saturation, white
balance, and other settings that are set when the image was taken. The CRW
format keeps those settings separate so that this software can change them
later. From what I understand, changing the white balance with the software
is just like setting it to that setting on the camera before you take the
picture. I just wander if the Photoshop RAW plugin has this same ability.

Neal

"Jim Townsend" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Neal Matthis wrote:
>
> > What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing

it
> > with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can

capture
> > in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the

other
> > CRW. So I really have two questions:

>
> Depends what you mean by best.. RAW gives you the most versatility, but

it's
> also more work. If you enjoy spending time in front of your computer

monitor,
> have lots of hard disk space and have lots of cash for flash memory, go

for
> RAW.
>
> JPEG is OK too.. I use JPEG myself most of the time. (But I *do* use

RAW, I'm
> not discounting it). It all depends..
>
> Whether you use JPEG or RAW... Always keep your original untouched. If

you're
> editing an original JPEG file, use the [save as] feature.. Don't save over

top
> of the original or the 'negative' will be lost.
>
> > 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format

should I
> > convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images, so

the
> > JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
> > converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data that

was
> > lost due to the JPG compression.

>
> Y'know what.. One JPEG save to a second generation doesn't do that much.

I
> can't tell the difference.. However, before you do this, try it yourself.
>
> Otherwise, if you've got *lots* of disk space, save as TIFF. That way you
> don't recompress and lose data. Tiff is also good if you plan on opening

and
> modifying the file several times.. The 3rd and subsequent savings start
> showing enough artifacts that an old set of blind eyes like me can see

'em.
>



 
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Bobby
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2003
Neil - Could you post the link?

"Neal Matthis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Thank for the reply. I did a little searching on the newsgroup and found

a
> link to a website that explained JPG, PNG, TIF and GIF. I never knew that
> GIFs were 8-bit color only. It also explained color spaces a little. The
> site said the same thing as you; use TIFF if you can spare the disk space.
> I do have a lot of disk space, so I'll probably stick with TIFF then make

a
> JPEG copy when I want to share or email them.
>
> The only other question I have regarding CRW files (Canon RAW), is whether

I
> should go ahead and immediately convert them to TIFF or leave them in CRW
> format with the Photoshop RAW plugin? My Digital Rebel came with software
> that can read the CRW files and can change the contrast, saturation, white
> balance, and other settings that are set when the image was taken. The

CRW
> format keeps those settings separate so that this software can change them
> later. From what I understand, changing the white balance with the

software
> is just like setting it to that setting on the camera before you take the
> picture. I just wander if the Photoshop RAW plugin has this same ability.
>
> Neal
>
> "Jim Townsend" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Neal Matthis wrote:
> >
> > > What is the best file format to have your image in when you are

editing
> it
> > > with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can

> capture
> > > in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the

> other
> > > CRW. So I really have two questions:

> >
> > Depends what you mean by best.. RAW gives you the most versatility, but

> it's
> > also more work. If you enjoy spending time in front of your computer

> monitor,
> > have lots of hard disk space and have lots of cash for flash memory, go

> for
> > RAW.
> >
> > JPEG is OK too.. I use JPEG myself most of the time. (But I *do* use

> RAW, I'm
> > not discounting it). It all depends..
> >
> > Whether you use JPEG or RAW... Always keep your original untouched. If

> you're
> > editing an original JPEG file, use the [save as] feature.. Don't save

over
> top
> > of the original or the 'negative' will be lost.
> >
> > > 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format

> should I
> > > convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images,

so
> the
> > > JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
> > > converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data

that
> was
> > > lost due to the JPG compression.

> >
> > Y'know what.. One JPEG save to a second generation doesn't do that

much.
> I
> > can't tell the difference.. However, before you do this, try it

yourself.
> >
> > Otherwise, if you've got *lots* of disk space, save as TIFF. That way

you
> > don't recompress and lose data. Tiff is also good if you plan on

opening
> and
> > modifying the file several times.. The 3rd and subsequent savings start
> > showing enough artifacts that an old set of blind eyes like me can see

> 'em.
> >

>
>



 
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HANSTEIS
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2003
>The only other question I have regarding CRW files (Canon RAW), is whether I
>should go ahead and immediately convert them to TIFF or leave them in CRW
>format with the Photoshop RAW plugin?


I've read warnings about old formats becoming unreadable after a while because
they fall out of favor. Is there any reason to expect that CRW or TIFF is more
likely than the other to meet this fate?

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (John Stanley)
Oh, threats of hell and hopes of Paradise--
One thing at least is certain: This life flies.
One thing is certain, and the rest is lies:
The rose that once has blown forever dies.

 
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Rafe B.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2003
On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 16:26:25 -0500, "Neal Matthis"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing it
>with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can capture
>in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the other
>CRW. So I really have two questions:
>
>1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format should I
>convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG images, so the
>JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
>converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data that was
>lost due to the JPG compression.
>
>2) For my CRW files, until I get the RAW image plug-in for Photoshop, I will
>have to convert them to something else. What should I convert to? I have
>the option of JPG, 8bit/channel TIFF and 16bit/channel TIFF. Even if I
>select TIFF, should I then convert to something else that's better for
>editing? Thanks.



While you're still working on the image, save to any lossless
format. PSD is Photoshop's native format, and quite a safe
bet, as is TIF.

Once you have completely finished messing with the image
in Photoshop or your chosed image editor, save to JPG format
if you like -- I'd use a high quality (low compression) setting,
because memory is cheap.

JPG is extremely memory efficient, and at high-quality settings
the image degradation is minimal and in many cases not even
observable. But what you want to avoid is opening a JPG,
editing, and re-saving as JPG.

I typically save my archival originals as TIF to CDs and DVDs,
and leave a high-quality JPG of each image on the hard drive.


rafe b.
http://www.terrapinphoto.com
 
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Povl H. Pedersen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-28-2003
On 2003-12-28, HANSTEIS <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>The only other question I have regarding CRW files (Canon RAW), is whether I
>>should go ahead and immediately convert them to TIFF or leave them in CRW
>>format with the Photoshop RAW plugin?

>
> I've read warnings about old formats becoming unreadable after a while because
> they fall out of favor. Is there any reason to expect that CRW or TIFF is more
> likely than the other to meet this fate?


TIFF is a standard, and some cameras even save in TIFF.
Raw format is proprietary, and so is Photoshop (but they
have been rever engineered).
 
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Neal Matthis
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-30-2003
http://www.scantips.com/basics09.html

"Bobby" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bsmdi3$eb0ds$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de...
> Neil - Could you post the link?
>
> "Neal Matthis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > Thank for the reply. I did a little searching on the newsgroup and

found
> a
> > link to a website that explained JPG, PNG, TIF and GIF. I never knew

that
> > GIFs were 8-bit color only. It also explained color spaces a little.

The
> > site said the same thing as you; use TIFF if you can spare the disk

space.
> > I do have a lot of disk space, so I'll probably stick with TIFF then

make
> a
> > JPEG copy when I want to share or email them.
> >
> > The only other question I have regarding CRW files (Canon RAW), is

whether
> I
> > should go ahead and immediately convert them to TIFF or leave them in

CRW
> > format with the Photoshop RAW plugin? My Digital Rebel came with

software
> > that can read the CRW files and can change the contrast, saturation,

white
> > balance, and other settings that are set when the image was taken. The

> CRW
> > format keeps those settings separate so that this software can change

them
> > later. From what I understand, changing the white balance with the

> software
> > is just like setting it to that setting on the camera before you take

the
> > picture. I just wander if the Photoshop RAW plugin has this same

ability.
> >
> > Neal
> >
> > "Jim Townsend" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > Neal Matthis wrote:
> > >
> > > > What is the best file format to have your image in when you are

> editing
> > it
> > > > with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can

> > capture
> > > > in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and the

> > other
> > > > CRW. So I really have two questions:
> > >
> > > Depends what you mean by best.. RAW gives you the most versatility,

but
> > it's
> > > also more work. If you enjoy spending time in front of your computer

> > monitor,
> > > have lots of hard disk space and have lots of cash for flash memory,

go
> > for
> > > RAW.
> > >
> > > JPEG is OK too.. I use JPEG myself most of the time. (But I *do* use

> > RAW, I'm
> > > not discounting it). It all depends..
> > >
> > > Whether you use JPEG or RAW... Always keep your original untouched.

If
> > you're
> > > editing an original JPEG file, use the [save as] feature.. Don't save

> over
> > top
> > > of the original or the 'negative' will be lost.
> > >
> > > > 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format

> > should I
> > > > convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG

images,
> so
> > the
> > > > JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I understand that
> > > > converting to some other non-lossy format will not recover the data

> that
> > was
> > > > lost due to the JPG compression.
> > >
> > > Y'know what.. One JPEG save to a second generation doesn't do that

> much.
> > I
> > > can't tell the difference.. However, before you do this, try it

> yourself.
> > >
> > > Otherwise, if you've got *lots* of disk space, save as TIFF. That way

> you
> > > don't recompress and lose data. Tiff is also good if you plan on

> opening
> > and
> > > modifying the file several times.. The 3rd and subsequent savings

start
> > > showing enough artifacts that an old set of blind eyes like me can see

> > 'em.
> > >

> >
> >

>
>



 
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Fuzzy Logic
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      01-06-2004
[posted and mailed]

"Neal Matthis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news(E-Mail Removed):

> What is the best file format to have your image in when you are editing
> it with Photoshop or other image editors? My Canon Digital Rebel can
> capture in JPG and CRW (Canon RAW), so about half my images are JPG and
> the other CRW. So I really have two questions:
>
> 1) For my images that were captured in JPG format, what file format
> should I convert them to to edit them? They're high quality 6.3MP JPG
> images, so the JPG compression loss shouldn't be too noticeable. I
> understand that converting to some other non-lossy format will not
> recover the data that was lost due to the JPG compression.
>
> 2) For my CRW files, until I get the RAW image plug-in for Photoshop, I
> will have to convert them to something else. What should I convert to?
> I have the option of JPG, 8bit/channel TIFF and 16bit/channel TIFF.
> Even if I select TIFF, should I then convert to something else that's
> better for editing? Thanks.


http://www.scantips.com/basics09.html

To summarize TIFF or PNG is recommended for master copies, JPG for pretty
well everything else.
 
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