Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > No one speaks english anymore??

Reply
Thread Tools

No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 17:02:33 -0400, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 21:33:17 -0700, Savageduck
><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>
>>> You seem to be saying that "paper prescriptions" and "standard
>>> prescription pads" are the same thing. A computer generated
>>> prescription printed at the doctor's office is still a paper
>>> prescription. My doctors don't use the prescription pad, and don't
>>> hand-write prescriptions. But, they do offer paper prescriptions that
>>> I can take out of the office.
>>>
>>> I have no experience, though, the Federal Class II prescriptions.

>>
>>A doctor is free to produce a paper prescription however he pleases, he
>>can have it printed off an office computer, he can write it on a
>>standard prescription blank from a preprinted pad, he can write it on a
>>paper towel, or the back of a business card, though that is rare. I am
>>sure that they sign the prescription printed off the office computer.

>
>No, they don't. At least the ones my doctors issue are not signed. At
>my cardiologist's office, the prescription is printed out at the desk
>where they schedule the next appointment and then handed to me. By the
>time this is done, the doctor is in the next examining room. There's
>not even a facsimile signature on the form.


I got thinking about this and decided to check it out. See:
http://www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/medic..._prescribe.pdf
and it says that:

Section 456.43, Florida Statutes, outlines requirements for electronic
prescribing software. Electronic signatures is the usage of any
letters, characters, or symbols manifested by electronic or similar
means, executed or adopted by a party with an intent to authenticate a
writing. A “writing” is electronically signed if an electronic
signature is logically associated with such writing and shall have the
same force and effect as a written signature.

So, in Florida, the doctor need not sign an electronically generated
prescription from software. That's why my doctors don't sign them.

Also, in Florida, the requirements to prescribe Schedule II, III, and
IV are different that what you describe in California. Here, the
doctor *may* use the forms you describe, but doesn't seem to be
required to. Evidently, the laws vary state-to-state.

I was wondering about this because the newspaper has been running a
series on "pill mills" and the abundance of counterfeit prescription
forms (even poorly executed ones) accepted by certain pharmacies.

There seem to be 50 answers to every question in the US.




--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Rikishi42
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
On 2013-03-27, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rikishi42
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> >> seen
>> >> >> Rx used for that.
>> >> >
>> >> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>> >> >
>> >> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
>> >> >
>> >> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>> >> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>> >> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>> >> that I can recall.
>> >
>> > and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
>> > doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
>> > huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
>> > difficult.
>> >
>> > as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>> > keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>> > picks it up or has it delivered.

>>
>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.

>
> not at all.
>
>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
>> had to run some other errands there.

>
> tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.


We don't do that in Belgium. A patient gets the prescription (usually
printed out, sometimes still written) and takes it to the pharmacy of
his/her choice.

But even if it would have been sent, that's my point: my mother would have
requested it'd be send to the pharmacy closest to her place. But I picked
up her prescription in the evening to get it the next day... and did so in
another town.


> it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
> believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
> there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).


Well, again that couldn't really apply here. Prices are fixed. No
differences between pharmacists, not for medication anyway. So no price
shopping.
.... and no one is uninsured. Doesn't exist. And there aren't really any
"types" of insurance. We find it weird the quality of care should depend on
your wealth. Doesn't mean you can't get some extra's, but...


Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?


--
When in doubt, use brute force.
-- Ken Thompson
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 07:23:44 -0700 (PDT), Whisky-dave
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>The most fasuinating kit they have for me are the beds HILL-ROM.
>you have buttons that control the hieght and angle of the bed, it's just a pity my mother hates them because she can;t get comforable, but they look impressive and are good for nursing staff.
>


Hill-Rom's headquarters are in Batesville, Indiana. That part of
Indiana is known for wooden furniture manufacturing (Hoosier kitchen
cabinets), and the Hillenbrand family started making wooden hospital
furniture. The family also started businesses making wooden cribs and
high chairs another company that makes caskets. Batesville Casket
sells caskets and burial vaults all over the US. I dunno if they are
still in the baby furniture business or not.


The company literally services people "cradle to grave".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
Rikishi42
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
On 2013-03-27, Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> > as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>>> > keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>>> > picks it up or has it delivered.
>>>
>>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.

>>
>>not at all.
>>
>>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
>>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
>>> had to run some other errands there.

>>
>>tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.
>>
>>it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
>>believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
>>there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).

>
> They don't? You consider an anecdotal post by one person "proof"?
> That's the same degree of proof you offered with your airplane market
> survey.
>
> If people don't price shop, then why do pharmacies advertise so
> heavily? I mean, if they are in your neighborhood they are
> automatically going to get the business according to you.


They advertise??? Weird, no pharmacy here would advertise. I don't think
they'd be allowed.


> Actually, you screwed up even your anecdotal proof. If the mother's
> prescription had been transmitted electronically, the transmission
> would have been made at the time she was given the prescription. The
> decision of where to fill it may have been made later by someone who
> hadn't planned to be in that area.


Yep, my point exactly. You don't allways know where you'll pick it up when
still at the doctor's.


--
When in doubt, use brute force.
-- Ken Thompson
 
Reply With Quote
 
Rikishi42
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
On 2013-03-28, Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> This is like your airplane market survey thing, isn't it? On the
>>> flight to Altoona, you noticed seven Mac users and five PC users and
>>> extrapolated that to mean that Macs have a seven to five dominance in
>>> the laptop market nationally.

>>
>>that's a gross misstatement of what i did. stop lying.

>
> Wasn't the flight to Altoona? Sorry.



The two of you are just an old married couple, aren't you?

--
When in doubt, use brute force.
-- Ken Thompson
 
Reply With Quote
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-28-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rikishi42
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
> supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?


most supermarkets here have pharmacies as part of the store. even
walmart has a pharmacy. you still need a prescription, unless it's over
the counter medication such as aspirin or tylenol.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-29-2013
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 23:03:46 +0100, Rikishi42
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On 2013-03-27, Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> > as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>>>> > keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>>>> > picks it up or has it delivered.
>>>>
>>>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.
>>>
>>>not at all.
>>>
>>>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
>>>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
>>>> had to run some other errands there.
>>>
>>>tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.
>>>
>>>it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
>>>believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
>>>there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).

>>
>> They don't? You consider an anecdotal post by one person "proof"?
>> That's the same degree of proof you offered with your airplane market
>> survey.
>>
>> If people don't price shop, then why do pharmacies advertise so
>> heavily? I mean, if they are in your neighborhood they are
>> automatically going to get the business according to you.

>
>They advertise??? Weird, no pharmacy here would advertise. I don't think
>they'd be allowed.


Most of the ads are place by supermarkets and Wal-Mart. Every
supermarket that I know of has a pharmacy department. I only know of
two free-standing pharmacies in this area, and one is a compounding
pharmacy. Supermarket ads for their pharmacy departments don't
advertise any specific product...just service and better pricing with
general statements. I don't think the drugstores advertise their
pharmacy departments.


>
>> Actually, you screwed up even your anecdotal proof. If the mother's
>> prescription had been transmitted electronically, the transmission
>> would have been made at the time she was given the prescription. The
>> decision of where to fill it may have been made later by someone who
>> hadn't planned to be in that area.

>
>Yep, my point exactly. You don't allways know where you'll pick it up when
>still at the doctor's.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-29-2013
On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 22:57:45 +0100, Rikishi42
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
>supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?
>

Well, every supermarket chain outlet has a pharmacy department. It's
no different from the pharmacy department in a drug store except that
the supermarket pharmacies don't usually make up a prescription. You
don't pick up prescription products off a shelf.

By "make up", I really mean "count out". A drug store pharmacy might
stock a particular medication in bulk and count them out to fill an
individual prescription. The supermarket version usually has them
pre-counted in standard quantities (ie: 30 pills per bottle). The
supermarket will have a dispensing pharmacy somewhere in town and make
deliveries to the branches each day. If I phone in a re-fill in the
morning, it's ready for pick-up after 3PM.

Other stores like Wal-Mart, Target, Costco, etc have pharmacy
departments.

There are only a few pharmacy-only businesses in this area.

The above is correct for the Orlando area and most places in Florida,
but I can't vouch for what is in place in other states.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-29-2013
On Fri, 29 Mar 2013 10:50:49 +1300, Eric Stevens
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>On Thu, 28 Mar 2013 06:50:38 -0700, Savageduck
><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
>
>>On 2013-03-28 06:35:01 -0700, Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>
>>> On Wednesday, March 27, 2013 3:33:17 PM UTC, nospam wrote:
>>>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>>>>
>>>> Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>
>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen
>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>
>>> Not in my world.

>>
>>Then your World is narrowly focused.
>>Rx has been an abbreviation for "prescription" long before electronics
>>and radio communications were dreamed of.

>
>Have you considered that it may be your world that is narrowly
>focussed? There is much more to the world than the US.
>
>Rx for prescriptions is not used in the UK, New Zealand or Australia.
>As far as I know it is not used in India, Switzerland or France. It
>almost certainly is not used in Russia, China or Japan.


Well, Eric, you can look at the person writing the post and pretty
much guess where his or her focus is.

Ireland uses Rx: http://www.iach.knox.amedd.army.mil/pharmacy.asp

The term is not unknown in the UK: http://www.rxsystems.co.uk/ and is
used by a company that designs prescription software.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-29-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >Allways wanted to ask this: is it true you can get medication in
> >supermarkets? Really? As if they were just groceries ?
> >

> Well, every supermarket chain outlet has a pharmacy department.


every single one?? you must be awful busy visiting all those stores.

the reality is that *most* supermarket chains have a pharmacy, however,
some have pharmacies only in select stores, which means the store
closest to you might not have pharmacy. also, some supermarket chains
don't have pharmacies at all no matter which store you go to.

> It's
> no different from the pharmacy department in a drug store except that
> the supermarket pharmacies don't usually make up a prescription. You
> don't pick up prescription products off a shelf.
>
> By "make up", I really mean "count out". A drug store pharmacy might
> stock a particular medication in bulk and count them out to fill an
> individual prescription. The supermarket version usually has them
> pre-counted in standard quantities (ie: 30 pills per bottle). The
> supermarket will have a dispensing pharmacy somewhere in town and make
> deliveries to the branches each day. If I phone in a re-fill in the
> morning, it's ready for pick-up after 3PM.


maybe yours does, but that would be unusual.

every supermarket pharmacy i've seen counts it out just like any other
pharmacy would. you can *see* them doing it. and you don't even have to
have a prescription filled to see it.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
German MUI ? Why does W64XP still "speaks" English? =?Utf-8?B?QXJubw==?= Windows 64bit 1 04-20-2006 02:15 PM
I want to make English-speaking friend to practic my poor English IchBin Java 1 03-26-2006 05:36 AM
English/English DLL =?Utf-8?B?UmFlZCBTYXdhbGhh?= ASP .Net 2 10-16-2005 10:32 AM
Dictionaries for English-French and English-Spanish fkissam Computer Support 2 07-14-2004 09:07 PM
AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH, CANADIAN, or AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH Proud USA Babe Digital Photography 247 10-07-2003 12:32 AM



Advertisments