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No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
Tony Cooper
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      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 17:54:28 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rikishi42
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> >> seen
>> >> >> Rx used for that.
>> >> >
>> >> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>> >> >
>> >> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
>> >> >
>> >> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>> >> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>> >> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>> >> that I can recall.
>> >
>> > and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
>> > doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
>> > huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
>> > difficult.
>> >
>> > as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>> > keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>> > picks it up or has it delivered.

>>
>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.

>
>not at all.
>
>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
>> had to run some other errands there.

>
>tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.
>
>it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
>believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
>there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).


They don't? You consider an anecdotal post by one person "proof"?
That's the same degree of proof you offered with your airplane market
survey.

If people don't price shop, then why do pharmacies advertise so
heavily? I mean, if they are in your neighborhood they are
automatically going to get the business according to you.

There are differences in prices for medications. A person's insurance
company may set the price all pharmacies will charge you, but that
price may be higher than another pharmacy will fill the prescription
without applying your insurance. My wife has a prescription she has
filled at Wal-Mart without using our insurance because it is
significantly less than our regular pharmacy using our insurance.

See...there's anecdotal "proof".

Actually, you screwed up even your anecdotal proof. If the mother's
prescription had been transmitted electronically, the transmission
would have been made at the time she was given the prescription. The
decision of where to fill it may have been made later by someone who
hadn't planned to be in that area.

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Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Tony Cooper
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      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 17:54:26 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>> The paper prescription is not dead, though.

>
>it's not completely dead but it's quickly becoming dead, much like film
>has. there are some situations where a paper prescription might be used
>but those are the exceptions.


This is like your airplane market survey thing, isn't it? On the
flight to Altoona, you noticed seven Mac users and five PC users and
extrapolated that to mean that Macs have a seven to five dominance in
the laptop market nationally.

Now, you're extrapolating what your own doctor, or doctors, do to the
national picture.

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Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 11:33 AM, nospam wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>>
>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen
>> Rx used for that.

>
> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>
> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>


Not for all scripts.

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PeterN
 
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Tony Cooper
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      03-28-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 17:54:23 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >> >> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >> >>
>> >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> >> seen
>> >> >> Rx used for that.
>> >> >
>> >> >rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>> >>
>> >> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".
>> >
>> >nobody said it was limited to only that.

>>
>> You did.

>
>english must not be your first language. nowhere did i say that was the
>only definition. you are once again twisting things so that you can
>argue.
>
>> >arguing just to argue again?
>> >
>> >> >anyway, it's done electronically now.
>> >>
>> >> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
>> >> prescription is requested by the patient.
>> >
>> >in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.

>>
>> What is "electronically" about a prescription on paper?

>
>nothing. that's why they don't normally do that anymore.
>
>but as i said, there are exceptions.
>
>> >there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
>> >
>> >a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
>> >wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
>> >resisted.

>>
>> Why would they do that? It takes no more time to scribble than to
>> tap.

>
>wrong, as usual.
>
>it's much quicker to tap a couple of keys than grab the prescription
>pad and pen and scribble out one or more prescriptions. the doctor is
>already in front of a computer looking at your medical history while
>typing in their notes and diagnosis.


What? All doctors have computers in each examining room? All of
them? I'm amazed at your ability to know what goes on in doctor's
offices all over the country.


>if it's a refill, they only need to click a button to re-send another
>set of prescriptions. there's no possible way a written prescription,
>let alone several, can be as quick as that.
>
>> >> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
>> >> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
>> >> prescription is to be sent electronically.
>> >
>> >they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
>> >doctor.

>>
>> How out of touch are you?

>
>far less than you.


Really? I spent my working career calling on doctors and hospitals.
Unfortunately, at my age, I probably spend more time now in doctor's
offices than you do.

Of course, I don't sit and project what I see to be what goes on
everywhere like you do.

>> The patient can't price shop without going
>> to the pharmacy. The pharmacy generally will not give the patient a
>> price figure if the patient doesn't have a prescription in hand and
>> whatever insurance information is pertinent. Therefore, the patient
>> has to leave the office with a paper prescription.

>
>first of all, most people don't price shop since there is no price
>difference. they pay a copay for the prescription and another copay for
>doctor visit. typically, it's $15-30 for common medications, no matter
>where they get it from.


About 50.7 million Americans do not have insurance at all. Add to
that people who have very limited insurance, people who are Medicare
but do not have supplemental insurance, and you have a significant
number of people who *do* price shop. Then, there are people who do
have insurance but their insurance provider will not cover certain
medications.

>second, most people pick a pharmacy based on convenience. they don't
>shop each prescription to get the best price. they'd be running all
>over town going to many different pharmacies filling prescriptions each
>time they went to the doctor.
>
>nevertheless, people could still price shop if they really want to.
>just let the doctor know where to send the info after deciding on which
>pharmacy. or, have a few days supply dispensed to a local pharmacy
>while you price shop for the rest. i'm sure the doctor loves patients
>like that.
>
>> Try asking a different pharmacy other than your regular one how much
>> your dosage of Benperidol will cost.

>
>not even a clever insult. i don't take that or anything else and i pay
>a copay for medications anyway so the answer would be $15 or $30,
>depending on what group it's in.


So what you are doing is typical of you: extrapolating a limited
knowledge to what everyone else does. And, incorrectly.


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Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 12:31 PM, nospam wrote:
> In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>
>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>>>> seen
>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>
>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>
>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>

>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>> that I can recall.

>
> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
> difficult.
>
> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
> picks it up or has it delivered.
>


An inaccurate statement.
By Law certain scripts have to be on paper. Think listed narcotics, with
highly addictive tendencies.

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PeterN
 
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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 4:43 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 12:31:49 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
> wrote:
>
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>>
>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>>>>> seen
>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>
>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>
>>> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".

>>
>> nobody said it was limited to only that.

>
> You did.
>
>> arguing just to argue again?
>>
>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>
>>> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
>>> prescription is requested by the patient.

>>
>> in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.

>
> What is "electronically" about a prescription on paper?
>
>>
>> there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
>>
>> a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
>> wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
>> resisted.

>
> Why would they do that? It takes no more time to scribble than to
> tap.
>
>>> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
>>> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
>>> prescription is to be sent electronically.

>>
>> they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
>> doctor.

>
> How out of touch are you? The patient can't price shop without going
> to the pharmacy. The pharmacy generally will not give the patient a
> price figure if the patient doesn't have a prescription in hand and
> whatever insurance information is pertinent. Therefore, the patient
> has to leave the office with a paper prescription.
>
> Try asking a different pharmacy other than your regular one how much
> your dosage of Benperidol will cost.
>


Don't argue with nospam. He did a survey, dontchaknow?


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PeterN
 
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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 5:41 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-27 14:09:03 -0700, George Kerby <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>>
>>
>>
>> On 3/27/13 11:47 AM, in article http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed), "Floyd L.
>> Davidson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> nospam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>> In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and
>>>>>>> no one
>>>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but
>>>>>>> I've never
>>>>>>> seen
>>>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>>>>
>>>>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>>>>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>>>>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>>>>> that I can recall.
>>>>
>>>> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
>>>> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
>>>> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
>>>> difficult.
>>>>
>>>> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>>>> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>>>> picks it up or has it delivered.
>>>
>>> Actually, in the US there are some drugs which cannot be
>>> sold without a hard copy paper prescription. No fax, and
>>> no electronic copy, only a hand delivered piece of paper
>>> with a doctor's signature.

>>
>> Those would be Class II narcotics.

>
> ...and today even those can be dealt with using eprescription.
> The Federal Class II narcotics prescription pad is a three piece
> self-carbon pad with some watermark and anti-forgery elements. So there
> is an original for submission to the pharmacy, a copy for the Feds, and
> a copy for the doctor's records. The same is achieved today with a
> paperless filing to the various record keepers and the dispenser.
> The paper prescription pads, standard & Fed are still maintained, but
> they are dying out fast


I have not seen that n NY. Every doc I know only uses paper for the
narcotics, even though the other scripts are done electronically.

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PeterN
 
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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 5:54 PM, nospam wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>>>>>> seen
>>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>>
>>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>>
>>>> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".
>>>
>>> nobody said it was limited to only that.

>>
>> You did.

>
> english must not be your first language. nowhere did i say that was the
> only definition. you are once again twisting things so that you can
> argue.
>
>>> arguing just to argue again?
>>>
>>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>>
>>>> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
>>>> prescription is requested by the patient.
>>>
>>> in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.

>>
>> What is "electronically" about a prescription on paper?

>
> nothing. that's why they don't normally do that anymore.
>
> but as i said, there are exceptions.


Yoyu only said that when cornered. You did not say that originally.

>
>>> there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
>>>
>>> a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
>>> wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
>>> resisted.

>>
>> Why would they do that? It takes no more time to scribble than to
>> tap.

>
> wrong, as usual.
>
> it's much quicker to tap a couple of keys than grab the prescription
> pad and pen and scribble out one or more prescriptions. the doctor is
> already in front of a computer looking at your medical history while
> typing in their notes and diagnosis.
>
> if it's a refill, they only need to click a button to re-send another
> set of prescriptions. there's no possible way a written prescription,
> let alone several, can be as quick as that.
>
>>>> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
>>>> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
>>>> prescription is to be sent electronically.
>>>
>>> they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
>>> doctor.

>>
>> How out of touch are you?

>
> far less than you.
>
>> The patient can't price shop without going
>> to the pharmacy. The pharmacy generally will not give the patient a
>> price figure if the patient doesn't have a prescription in hand and
>> whatever insurance information is pertinent. Therefore, the patient
>> has to leave the office with a paper prescription.

>
> first of all, most people don't price shop since there is no price
> difference. they pay a copay for the prescription and another copay for
> doctor visit. typically, it's $15-30 for common medications, no matter
> where they get it from.


wrong again. In FL Publix will not charge a co-pay for certain scripts.
Other places such as Walmart, have lower co-pays for certain scripts.
Shall we do another survey?

>
> second, most people pick a pharmacy based on convenience. they don't
> shop each prescription to get the best price. they'd be running all
> over town going to many different pharmacies filling prescriptions each
> time they went to the doctor.
>
> nevertheless, people could still price shop if they really want to.
> just let the doctor know where to send the info after deciding on which
> pharmacy. or, have a few days supply dispensed to a local pharmacy
> while you price shop for the rest. i'm sure the doctor loves patients
> like that.
>
>> Try asking a different pharmacy other than your regular one how much
>> your dosage of Benperidol will cost.

>
> not even a clever insult. i don't take that or anything else and i pay
> a copay for medications anyway so the answer would be $15 or $30,
> depending on what group it's in.
>



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PeterN
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      03-28-2013
On 3/27/2013 5:54 PM, nospam wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rikishi42
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>>>>>> seen
>>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>>
>>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>>>
>>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>>>
>>>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>>>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>>>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>>>> that I can recall.
>>>
>>> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
>>> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
>>> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
>>> difficult.
>>>
>>> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
>>> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
>>> picks it up or has it delivered.

>>
>> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.

>
> not at all.
>
>> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
>> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
>> had to run some other errands there.

>
> tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.
>
> it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
> believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
> there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).
>


You might want to check your facts, such as how many are uninsured, and
how many scripts are NOT covered by insurance.

As a matter of fact I can get some of my meds for a lower price than my
co-pay.

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PeterN
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-28-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 08:47:45 -0800, (E-Mail Removed) (Floyd L. Davidson)
wrote:
: nospam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
: ><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >
: >> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
: >> >>
: >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
: >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
: >> >> seen
: >> >> Rx used for that.
: >> >
: >> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
: >> >
: >> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
: >> >
: >> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
: >> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
: >> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
: >> that I can recall.
: >
: >and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
: >doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
: >huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
: >difficult.
: >
: >as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
: >keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
: >picks it up or has it delivered.
:
: Actually, in the US there are some drugs which cannot be
: sold without a hard copy paper prescription. No fax, and
: no electronic copy, only a hand delivered piece of paper
: with a doctor's signature.

Well, you're probably right, but I doubt that it matters in most cases.
Between us, my wife and I take upwards of twenty medications daily, and what
you say doesn't apply to any of them.

Bob
 
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