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No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
Tony Cooper
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      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 11:33:17 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
>Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>>
>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen
>> Rx used for that.

>
>rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.


Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".

>anyway, it's done electronically now.


By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
prescription is requested by the patient.

A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
prescription is to be sent electronically.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
> >>
> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
> >> seen
> >> Rx used for that.

> >
> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
> >
> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
> >

> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
> that I can recall.


and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
difficult.

as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
picks it up or has it delivered.
 
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nospam
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
> >>
> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
> >> seen
> >> Rx used for that.

> >
> >rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.

>
> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".


nobody said it was limited to only that.

arguing just to argue again?

> >anyway, it's done electronically now.

>
> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
> prescription is requested by the patient.


in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.

there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.

a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
resisted.

> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
> prescription is to be sent electronically.


they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
doctor.
 
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Tony Cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 12:31:49 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >>
>> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> seen
>> >> Rx used for that.
>> >
>> >rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.

>>
>> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".

>
>nobody said it was limited to only that.


You did.

>arguing just to argue again?
>
>> >anyway, it's done electronically now.

>>
>> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
>> prescription is requested by the patient.

>
>in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.


What is "electronically" about a prescription on paper?

>
>there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
>
>a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
>wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
>resisted.


Why would they do that? It takes no more time to scribble than to
tap.

>> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
>> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
>> prescription is to be sent electronically.

>
>they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
>doctor.


How out of touch are you? The patient can't price shop without going
to the pharmacy. The pharmacy generally will not give the patient a
price figure if the patient doesn't have a prescription in hand and
whatever insurance information is pertinent. Therefore, the patient
has to leave the office with a paper prescription.

Try asking a different pharmacy other than your regular one how much
your dosage of Benperidol will cost.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Tony Cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 10:03:13 -0700, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

>On 2013-03-27 09:31:49 -0700, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>>>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>>>>>
>>>>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>>>>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>>>>> seen
>>>>> Rx used for that.
>>>>
>>>> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>>>
>>> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".

>>
>> nobody said it was limited to only that.
>>
>> arguing just to argue again?
>>
>>>> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>>>
>>> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
>>> prescription is requested by the patient.

>>
>> in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.
>>
>> there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
>>
>> a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
>> wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
>> resisted.
>>
>>> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
>>> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
>>> prescription is to be sent electronically.

>>
>> they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
>> doctor.

>
>My doctor uses an iPad which gives him access to my entire chart with
>medication, treatment history, insurance information, and eprescribing.
>Lab results are returned to the electronic chart and are also available
>to me via < http://www.eclinicalworks.com/ > "Health portal". That
>gives me my medical history, Appointments, Health records, Lab reports,
>and messages from the Dr's office.
>The doctor and his practice have desktop, laptop, tablet, and smart
>phone access to this system.
>
>He has the ability to send prescriptions to any of the pharmacies in
>California, or any of the major mail order pharmacies associated with
>the medical insurance companies. In my case with my CalPers Anthem
>coverage my regular prescriptions are filled by the CVS mail order
>system. For immediate prescriptions the order is sent to the local
>pharmacy of my choosing.
>
>In the last three years the only paper prescription I have received was
>from my dental surgeon doing an implant for an antibiotic and pain meds.


Neither my primary care physician group nor my cardiologist use Ipads,
but both have computer stations in each exam room. They can
electronically send prescriptions from those stations.

The paper prescription is not dead, though. In the past year I've
requested them for a strong pain medication that I wasn't sure I'd
need as a result of an injury (and didn't end up ordering), a topical
product that I didn't want to fill until my present supply ran out,
and an allergy sinus spray that I didn't want filled for the same
reason. A paper prescription is good for 12 months (unless otherwise
designated), but my pharmacy insists that ordered medications be
picked up within two weeks. And, an Emergency Walk-In clinic I used
for another injury sent me out with a paper prescription. Also, my
ophthalmologist's eyeglass order is a prescription and I want that on
paper because I don't order from his extremely over-priced on-site
optometrist.

What has changed - at least with the doctors that I use - is the form.
I haven't been issued one of those prescriptions on a prescription pad
for years. They have all been print-outs from a computer station
because they are linked to my patient records. There's less chance
this way that what the doctor writes on the little pad is correctly
entered in the records.

Even if the prescription is electronically transmitted to the
pharmacy, I get a print-out of what has been ordered. In essence, a
duplicate prescription but non-fillable. That form could be copied
and altered to make it fillable, so electronic transmission doesn't
prevent prescription fraud.

Most of the fraud going on in area is done by the "Pill Mill" doctors
who hand out prescriptions for products like Oxycodone without
examination or basis. The state keeps closing these Pill Mills, but -
so far - no jail time for the doctors.




--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Rikishi42
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On 2013-03-27, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >>
>> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> seen
>> >> Rx used for that.
>> >
>> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>> >
>> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
>> >

>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>> that I can recall.

>
> and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
> doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
> huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
> difficult.
>
> as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
> keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
> picks it up or has it delivered.


Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.
I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
had to run some other errands there.


--
When in doubt, use brute force.
-- Ken Thompson
 
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nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> >> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
> >> >>
> >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
> >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
> >> >> seen
> >> >> Rx used for that.
> >> >
> >> >rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
> >>
> >> Among other things, but not limited to "prescription".

> >
> >nobody said it was limited to only that.

>
> You did.


english must not be your first language. nowhere did i say that was the
only definition. you are once again twisting things so that you can
argue.

> >arguing just to argue again?
> >
> >> >anyway, it's done electronically now.
> >>
> >> By some, but not all doctors. And, by some doctors unless a written
> >> prescription is requested by the patient.

> >
> >in other words, it's done electronically, as i said.

>
> What is "electronically" about a prescription on paper?


nothing. that's why they don't normally do that anymore.

but as i said, there are exceptions.

> >there are no doubt exceptions, but it's no longer the default.
> >
> >a patient could still request a paper prescription, although it
> >wouldn't surprise me if that request was declined or at least strongly
> >resisted.

>
> Why would they do that? It takes no more time to scribble than to
> tap.


wrong, as usual.

it's much quicker to tap a couple of keys than grab the prescription
pad and pen and scribble out one or more prescriptions. the doctor is
already in front of a computer looking at your medical history while
typing in their notes and diagnosis.

if it's a refill, they only need to click a button to re-send another
set of prescriptions. there's no possible way a written prescription,
let alone several, can be as quick as that.

> >> A patient may wish to shop around for the best price on a prescribed
> >> item, so the patient would not want to immediately decide where the
> >> prescription is to be sent electronically.

> >
> >they can still do that. the patient chooses the pharmacy, not the
> >doctor.

>
> How out of touch are you?


far less than you.

> The patient can't price shop without going
> to the pharmacy. The pharmacy generally will not give the patient a
> price figure if the patient doesn't have a prescription in hand and
> whatever insurance information is pertinent. Therefore, the patient
> has to leave the office with a paper prescription.


first of all, most people don't price shop since there is no price
difference. they pay a copay for the prescription and another copay for
doctor visit. typically, it's $15-30 for common medications, no matter
where they get it from.

second, most people pick a pharmacy based on convenience. they don't
shop each prescription to get the best price. they'd be running all
over town going to many different pharmacies filling prescriptions each
time they went to the doctor.

nevertheless, people could still price shop if they really want to.
just let the doctor know where to send the info after deciding on which
pharmacy. or, have a few days supply dispensed to a local pharmacy
while you price shop for the rest. i'm sure the doctor loves patients
like that.

> Try asking a different pharmacy other than your regular one how much
> your dosage of Benperidol will cost.


not even a clever insult. i don't take that or anything else and i pay
a copay for medications anyway so the answer would be $15 or $30,
depending on what group it's in.
 
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nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Tony Cooper
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >My doctor uses an iPad which gives him access to my entire chart with
> >medication, treatment history, insurance information, and eprescribing.
> >Lab results are returned to the electronic chart and are also available
> >to me via < http://www.eclinicalworks.com/ > "Health portal". That
> >gives me my medical history, Appointments, Health records, Lab reports,
> >and messages from the Dr's office.
> >The doctor and his practice have desktop, laptop, tablet, and smart
> >phone access to this system.
> >
> >He has the ability to send prescriptions to any of the pharmacies in
> >California, or any of the major mail order pharmacies associated with
> >the medical insurance companies. In my case with my CalPers Anthem
> >coverage my regular prescriptions are filled by the CVS mail order
> >system. For immediate prescriptions the order is sent to the local
> >pharmacy of my choosing.
> >
> >In the last three years the only paper prescription I have received was
> >from my dental surgeon doing an implant for an antibiotic and pain meds.

>
> Neither my primary care physician group nor my cardiologist use Ipads,
> but both have computer stations in each exam room. They can
> electronically send prescriptions from those stations.


yet you say it's faster to write out a prescription and now you
contradict yourself. try to keep your story straight.

> The paper prescription is not dead, though.


it's not completely dead but it's quickly becoming dead, much like film
has. there are some situations where a paper prescription might be used
but those are the exceptions.
 
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nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Rikishi42
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> >> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
> >> >>
> >> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
> >> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
> >> >> seen
> >> >> Rx used for that.
> >> >
> >> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
> >> >
> >> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
> >> >
> >> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
> >> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
> >> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
> >> that I can recall.

> >
> > and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
> > doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy. a
> > huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
> > difficult.
> >
> > as i said, these days everything is computerized. the doctor taps a few
> > keys and the prescription is sent to the pharmacy. the patient either
> > picks it up or has it delivered.

>
> Kind of restricting, in terms of where you can pick up your medication.


not at all.

> I mean, earlier this week I had to pickup something for my mother who was in
> no state to drive. So I picked it up in a pharmacy in the next town, since I
> had to run some other errands there.


tell the doctor to send it to whatever pharmacy you want.

it's also further proof that people don't price shop like tony wants to
believe. people pick a pharmacy based on convenience or service because
there isn't actually a price difference (unless they're uninsured).
 
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Tony Cooper
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Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 12:31:47 -0400, nospam <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>In article <kiv52k$u3v$(E-Mail Removed)>, James Silverton
><(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> >>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.
>> >>
>> >> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> >> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never
>> >> seen
>> >> Rx used for that.
>> >
>> > rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>> >
>> > anyway, it's done electronically now.
>> >

>> Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
>> even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
>> think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
>> that I can recall.

>
>and sometimes they phone in the prescription. either way, the patient
>doesn't leave with a piece of paper he has to take to a pharmacy.


Why do you think the patient doesn't leave the office with a piece of
paper? Some do, some don't. Is this another airplane seat survey
you've run with an extremely limited source base?

The physicians I go to offer me the choice of a piece of paper or
transmitting the prescription to where I want it filled. It's my
choice.

>a
>huge advantage is that forged prescriptions become *extremely*
>difficult.


Not really. Having access to a hard copy of a prescription isn't
required for prescription fraud. As you say...everything is
computerized. A miscreant can find a form on the web or create a fake
form without being issued one.

The best way to reduce prescription fraud is a shared database of
prescriptions that flags excessive users of certain drugs and
pharmacies that fill a large volume of prescriptions for certain
drugs. The states are reluctant to pass legislation that requires
this and the lobbyists representing the pharmaceutical makers and the
pharmacies are active in fighting any step in this direction. It's a
profitable business.

The advantage to the physician in transmitting electronically is the
automatic link to the patient records without any need for
transcribing a chart. It all but eliminates errors in transcription.
The advantage to the patient is the elimination of the wait to fill
the prescription when a paper prescription is used. The pharmacy's
benefit is electronic record storage instead of physical record
storage. You'd think people would care about fraud, but that's not
really a factor.












--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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