Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > No one speaks english anymore??

Reply
Thread Tools

No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
Robert Coe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-23-2013
On Wed, 20 Mar 2013 20:51:52 +1300, Eric Stevens <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 22:44:31 -0700, Savageduck
: <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
:
: >On 2013-03-19 22:05:50 -0700, rwalker <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
: >
: >> On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:35:14 -0400, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >>
: >>> But that's not at all what Mr Walker said. He said he thought the pretense to
: >>> finding the regional dialects of others incomprehensible is a bit of snobbery.
: >>>
: >>> Bob
: >>
: >> Exactly.
: >
: >However, there are times the failure to comprehend that regional
: >dialect and accent is not a pretense. I can certainly attest that while
: >I was able understand what cousin D.M. and his wife Stella, with their
: >native Rock Spring, GA accents were saying, my English born wife Sue
: >didn't, and Stella was hard pressed to understand Sue.
: >That certainly didn't have anything to do with snobbery on her part, or
: >Stella's, but was explained by their lack of familiarity with those
: >particular accents. Stella and Sue hit it off great, but neither one
: >had a clue as to what the other was saying. Perhaps that was a form of
: >linguistic diplomacy, but both D.M. and I acted as interpreters
: >translating English to English.
:
: And I've heard that certain deep dark accents from the back of
: Lancashire can be understood by certain Norwegian speakers. So when
: does a dialect cease to become a dialect and become a language?

In simplest terms, they do it by drawing "isoglosses" on a map. An isogloss is
rather like a contour line, and it indicates that a certain word or
phraseology or pronunciation is predominant on one side of the line but not on
the other. When a sufficiently large "bundle" of isoglosses traces
approximately the same pattern, it's considered a regional dialect boundary.
When the boundary becomes a language boundary is a bit subjective, but it
usually requires that the speakers themselves recognize the boundary as real
and have at least some serious difficulty understanding the speakers on the
other side.

At least that's what they told us when I took linguistics in college many
years ago. :^)

As for Norwegian, its linguistic affinities place it somewhere between English
and German. Though it's closer to German than to English, it's a lot more
similar to English than German is.

Bob
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
PeterN
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-23-2013
On 3/18/2013 12:56 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 23:55:31 -0400, "Mayayana"
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>
>> | Time moved on, and my family moved to Tucson Arizona. A
>> | few years later I attended the University of Arizona,
>> | and took a chemistry class with a lab, and my assigned
>> | lab partner was from Brooklyn NY. I couldn't understand
>> | a word he said!
>>
>> I once lived in Tucson, but I don't remember any Arizona
>> accent. Most of the older people I knew were from NY. The
>> younger people were mainly midwest immigrants. The U of A
>> students seemed to be mainly from California. I only had one
>> acquaintance who was a Tucson native and she had no
>> discernible accent.

>
> Floyd made no claims about an Arizona accent. He happened to be in
> Arizona, and was in conversations with a Brooklynite. It was the
> Brooklynite who had the accent. The Arizona reference was simply
> where he happened to be when he came across the Brooklyn accent.
>
> The Brooklyn, Bronx, New York accent being such that not a word could
> be understood is, of course, hyperbole. Certainly, some people from
> that area have pronounced accents and use some terms that are not
> idiomatic to Washingtonians (where Floyd was from) or to Arizonians
> (where Floyd was at the time), but they are for the most part
> understandable. The biggest difference, to my ear, is that they sound
> more aggressive in normal conversation than I'm used to as a native
> Midwesterner.
>
>> | Whatever, regional accents and dialectic differences in
>> | how language is spoken and used are very real and are
>> | not in any way a class distinction.
>> |
>>
>> In my experience they're nothing but. Anyone who goes to
>> colllege these days comes out with an Ohio-style, neutral
>> accent.

>
> That's as much hyperbolic as Floyd's comment. Some coming out of the
> better eastern universities cultivate what would be called in the UK
> "RP", or "Received Pronunciation" that is associated with the
> upper-class. Some coming out of SEC universities strive to maintain
> their southern accents as a mark of their own special culture and
> charm.
>


Some Brooklynese can be tough to understand.
They put earl in your car, and oil is British nobility.
Best if we furgedaboudit.

--
PeterN



--
PeterN
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Robert Coe
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-23-2013
On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 21:03:46 +1300, Eric Stevens <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: On Thu, 21 Mar 2013 01:53:26 -0400, rwalker <(E-Mail Removed)>
: wrote:
:
: >On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 22:44:31 -0700, Savageduck
: ><savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
: >
: >>On 2013-03-19 22:05:50 -0700, rwalker <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
: >>
: >>> On Tue, 19 Mar 2013 10:35:14 -0400, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >>>
: >>>> But that's not at all what Mr Walker said. He said he thought the pretense to
: >>>> finding the regional dialects of others incomprehensible is a bit of snobbery.
: >>>>
: >>>> Bob
: >>>
: >>> Exactly.
: >>
: >>However, there are times the failure to comprehend that regional
: >>dialect and accent is not a pretense. I can certainly attest that while
: >>I was able understand what cousin D.M. and his wife Stella, with their
: >>native Rock Spring, GA accents were saying, my English born wife Sue
: >>didn't, and Stella was hard pressed to understand Sue.
: >>That certainly didn't have anything to do with snobbery on her part, or
: >>Stella's, but was explained by their lack of familiarity with those
: >>particular accents. Stella and Sue hit it off great, but neither one
: >>had a clue as to what the other was saying. Perhaps that was a form of
: >>linguistic diplomacy, but both D.M. and I acted as interpreters
: >>translating English to English.
: >
: >Well, that's a bigger separation than I'm talking about. I've never
: >found a region in the U.S. (and I'm a U.S. native) where I couldn't
: >understand their spoken English. But there are certainly accents from
: >the British Isles that I have trouble with. But I grew up Arkansas and
: >West Virginia, and I've become sensitized to a lifetime of "ignorant
: >hillbilly" comments. (I have a Ph.D., shoes and my own teeth by the
: >way).
:
: Are you familiar with the suggestion that some of the hillbilly
: accents may be not too different from the English speech of the 17th
: and 18th centuries?

I believe that's now considered an overstatement. But I've also heard the
somewhat weaker claim that the standard pronunciation (such as it is) of
American English has changed less since colonial times than the standard
pronunciation of British English has. IOW, that, on average, Shakespeare might
have an easier time trying to converse with an American than with a Brit.

Bob
 
Reply With Quote
 
Whisky-dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-26-2013
On Thursday, March 21, 2013 3:14:09 PM UTC, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-21 07:33:43 -0700, Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>
>
> Being born in East London, I know I ain't got no accent mate, got it !
>
> > the rest of the world has accents or speech deficiencies is perhaps the

>
> > polite term

>
>
>
> ...and your accent and speech deficiencies are quite obvious to all,


How's that then.... it's it the same as doctors having deficiencies because you can't understand what they write, my mum has that problem.


>
> with every word you type.
>
>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Regards,
>
>
>
> Savageduck


 
Reply With Quote
 
Whisky-dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wednesday, March 27, 2013 1:16:23 AM UTC, Eric Stevens wrote:
> On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 06:35:34 -0700 (PDT), Whisky-dave
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
> >On Thursday, March 21, 2013 3:14:09 PM UTC, Savageduck wrote:

>
> >> On 2013-03-21 07:33:43 -0700, Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> said:

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >> Being born in East London, I know I ain't got no accent mate, got it !

>
> >>

>
> >> > the rest of the world has accents or speech deficiencies is perhaps the

>
> >>

>
> >> > polite term

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >>

>
> >> ...and your accent and speech deficiencies are quite obvious to all,

>
> >

>
> >How's that then.... it's it the same as doctors having deficiencies because you can't understand what they write, my mum has that problem.

>
>
>
> I recently met a surgeon whose writing is so good that he good get a
>
> job as an architectural draftsman.


And drug addicats that are amazing artists, yep that's true.

But how about your sentance above do you suffer mild dsylexia too,
or are yuo too just an idiot. ?

"writing is so good that he good get a"

two goods don't make whatever they don't make.

 
Reply With Quote
 
Whisky-dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wednesday, March 27, 2013 1:31:36 AM UTC, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-26 18:16:23 -0700, Eric Stevens <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>
>
> > On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 06:35:34 -0700 (PDT), Whisky-dave

>
> > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
> >

>
> >> On Thursday, March 21, 2013 3:14:09 PM UTC, Savageduck wrote:

>
> >>> On 2013-03-21 07:33:43 -0700, Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> said:

>
> >>> Being born in East London, I know I ain't got no accent mate, got it !

>
> >>>

>
> >>>> the rest of the world has accents or speech deficiencies is perhaps the

>
> >>>> polite term

>
> >>>

>
> >>> ...and your accent and speech deficiencies are quite obvious to all,

>
> >>

>
> >> How's that then.... it's it the same as doctors having deficiencies

>
> >> because you can't understand what they write, my mum has that problem.

>
> >

>
> > I recently met a surgeon whose writing is so good that he good get a

>
> > job as an architectural draftsman.

>
>
>
> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.


Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen Rx used for that.

> All his
>
> prescriptions are posted to the pharmacy of the patient's choice, or
>
> medical insurance medication provider, via his tablet patient
>
> management application.


I haven;t seen my doctor in... well it's was before I brought my first Mac in the mid 1990s so no idea what happens. My mums in hospital; and her records are in an A4 folder at the bottom of her bed with ticket boxes and signatures and/or squiggles .

 
Reply With Quote
 
Tony Cooper
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 07:44:45 -0700 (PDT), Whisky-dave
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>
>Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen Rx used for that.
>


Dunno about where you are, but in the US "Rx" is used to mean
"prescription" as in a doctor's prescription. The origin is Latin:
"recipere" = "to take". In print, where it is possible to use a
symbol, the shape is an "R" with the right leg of the "R" crossed to
combine R and X.

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rx_symbol.png

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
Reply With Quote
 
Whisky-dave
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On Wednesday, March 27, 2013 2:55:26 PM UTC, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Wed, 27 Mar 2013 07:44:45 -0700 (PDT), Whisky-dave
>
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>
>
> >> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>
> >

>
> >Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen Rx used for that.

>
> >

>
>
>
> Dunno about where you are, but in the US "Rx" is used to mean
>
> "prescription" as in a doctor's prescription. The origin is Latin:
>
> "recipere" = "to take". In print, where it is possible to use a
>
> symbol, the shape is an "R" with the right leg of the "R" crossed to
>
> combine R and X.
>
>
>
> http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rx_symbol.png


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rx



 
Reply With Quote
 
nospam
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> > My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>
> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen
> Rx used for that.


rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.

anyway, it's done electronically now.
 
Reply With Quote
 
James Silverton
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      03-27-2013
On 3/27/2013 11:33 AM, nospam wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Whisky-dave <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>> My doctor hasn't written a paper Rx in over two years.

>>
>> Rx ??? I use rx & tx for transmit and receive in electronics and no one
>> tells me I've spelt them wrong, I assume you mean receipt but I've never seen
>> Rx used for that.

>
> rx is short for prescription, which is obvious from context.
>
> anyway, it's done electronically now.
>

Pharmacies and physicians offices still seem to be very fond of faxing
even if the prevalence of computers in offices has increased. Come to
think of it, this medical anachronism is one of the few uses of faxes
that I can recall.

--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

Extraneous "not" in Reply To.
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
German MUI ? Why does W64XP still "speaks" English? =?Utf-8?B?QXJubw==?= Windows 64bit 1 04-20-2006 02:15 PM
I want to make English-speaking friend to practic my poor English IchBin Java 1 03-26-2006 05:36 AM
English/English DLL =?Utf-8?B?UmFlZCBTYXdhbGhh?= ASP .Net 2 10-16-2005 10:32 AM
Dictionaries for English-French and English-Spanish fkissam Computer Support 2 07-14-2004 09:07 PM
AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH, CANADIAN, or AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH Proud USA Babe Digital Photography 247 10-07-2003 12:32 AM



Advertisments