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No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
PeterN
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      03-17-2013
On 3/15/2013 3:35 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
> On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:02:40 +1100, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> : Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
> : dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
> : were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
> : long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
> : conversation but I don't think either understood each other.
>
> Once at a hotel restaurant in Trondheim, Norway, the waitress addressed me in
> English, but I decided to try out my 3-day-old Norwegian. She immediately
> concluded that I didn't speak either language and smoothly switched to German.
> I know enough German to grasp what she was saying, but I knew when I was
> licked and reverted to English. The waitress didn't tell me I was crazy, but
> I'm sure that's what she thought.


After spending a week in Spain, I worked up the nerve to try my pigeon
Spanish by asking for directions: The young lady I asked replied, with a
distinctly British accent, "I'm sorry sir, I don't understand Spanish."


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PeterN
 
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PeterN
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      03-17-2013
On 3/15/2013 11:19 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-15 20:07:31 -0700, MaxD <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On 3/15/2013 3:14 AM, Savageduck wrote:
>>> On 2013-03-15 01:00:51 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:

>>
>>
>>>> The French don't want to speak to Canadian French speaking people.
>>>> Must have been the war the French lost and still show hostilities.
>>>
>>> Most of the "Arcadians" ended up in Louisiana, and nobody understands
>>> them.
>>>

>>
>> excusez-moi!!
>>
>> Max

>
> You have mois which need excusing?
> OK! I guess I should have spelt it correctly, "Acadians".
>
> Careful you don't OD on andouille, I understand the DEA is considering
> labeling it a controlled substance.
>


I hear there is a move to ban poutine.

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PeterN
 
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PeterN
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      03-17-2013
On 3/16/2013 11:17 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-16 20:03:03 -0700, PeterN <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On 3/15/2013 11:19 PM, Savageduck wrote:
>>> On 2013-03-15 20:07:31 -0700, MaxD <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>>
>>>> On 3/15/2013 3:14 AM, Savageduck wrote:
>>>>> On 2013-03-15 01:00:51 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>> The French don't want to speak to Canadian French speaking people.
>>>>>> Must have been the war the French lost and still show hostilities.
>>>>>
>>>>> Most of the "Arcadians" ended up in Louisiana, and nobody understands
>>>>> them.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> excusez-moi!!
>>>>
>>>> Max
>>>
>>> You have mois which need excusing?
>>> OK! I guess I should have spelt it correctly, "Acadians".
>>>
>>> Careful you don't OD on andouille, I understand the DEA is considering
>>> labeling it a controlled substance.
>>>

>>
>> I hear there is a move to ban poutine.

>
> I don't believe poutine made it into Cajun cuisine, or even much beyond
> a minor intrusion, just below the North-Eastern Canadian-US border.
> ...unless there is a little known "poutine underground" which Homeland
> Security has yet to unearth.
>
>


The grounds for a proposed ban on poutine are the polar opposites of any
ban on Debouillie.


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PeterN
 
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Rob
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      03-17-2013
On 17/03/2013 1:53 PM, PeterN wrote:
> On 3/15/2013 3:35 PM, Robert Coe wrote:
>> On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:02:40 +1100, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> : Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
>> : dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
>> : were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
>> : long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
>> : conversation but I don't think either understood each other.
>>
>> Once at a hotel restaurant in Trondheim, Norway, the waitress
>> addressed me in
>> English, but I decided to try out my 3-day-old Norwegian. She immediately
>> concluded that I didn't speak either language and smoothly switched to
>> German.
>> I know enough German to grasp what she was saying, but I knew when I was
>> licked and reverted to English. The waitress didn't tell me I was
>> crazy, but
>> I'm sure that's what she thought.

>
> After spending a week in Spain, I worked up the nerve to try my pigeon
> Spanish by asking for directions: The young lady I asked replied, with a
> distinctly British accent, "I'm sorry sir, I don't understand Spanish."
>
>


Speaking Swiss/German this chap came up and asked "where's the railway
station", which I understood, my reply in English "down there" I don't
know what his thoughts were.
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      03-17-2013
Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Speaking Swiss/German this chap came up and asked "where's the railway
> station", which I understood, my reply in English "down there" I don't
> know what his thoughts were.


He only understood "railway station".

(Translate that!)

-Wolfgang
 
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Mayayana
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      03-18-2013

| Time moved on, and my family moved to Tucson Arizona. A
| few years later I attended the University of Arizona,
| and took a chemistry class with a lab, and my assigned
| lab partner was from Brooklyn NY. I couldn't understand
| a word he said!

I once lived in Tucson, but I don't remember any Arizona
accent. Most of the older people I knew were from NY. The
younger people were mainly midwest immigrants. The U of A
students seemed to be mainly from California. I only had one
acquaintance who was a Tucson native and she had no
discernible accent.

| Whatever, regional accents and dialectic differences in
| how language is spoken and used are very real and are
| not in any way a class distinction.
|

In my experience they're nothing but. Anyone who goes to
colllege these days comes out with an Ohio-style, neutral
accent. It's become the mark of culture. *Any* local accent
indicates a person who is not versed in the standards of
the PC multiculturalism that's disseminated through mainstream
media and required for white-collar employment. But of course
the educated classes no longer make fun of yokels. So long
as they don't live nearby such people are appreciated as living
examples of rich, "authentic" ethnicity and interviewed for PBS
documentaries.


 
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Tony Cooper
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      03-18-2013
On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 23:55:31 -0400, "Mayayana"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>| Time moved on, and my family moved to Tucson Arizona. A
>| few years later I attended the University of Arizona,
>| and took a chemistry class with a lab, and my assigned
>| lab partner was from Brooklyn NY. I couldn't understand
>| a word he said!
>
> I once lived in Tucson, but I don't remember any Arizona
>accent. Most of the older people I knew were from NY. The
>younger people were mainly midwest immigrants. The U of A
>students seemed to be mainly from California. I only had one
>acquaintance who was a Tucson native and she had no
>discernible accent.


Floyd made no claims about an Arizona accent. He happened to be in
Arizona, and was in conversations with a Brooklynite. It was the
Brooklynite who had the accent. The Arizona reference was simply
where he happened to be when he came across the Brooklyn accent.

The Brooklyn, Bronx, New York accent being such that not a word could
be understood is, of course, hyperbole. Certainly, some people from
that area have pronounced accents and use some terms that are not
idiomatic to Washingtonians (where Floyd was from) or to Arizonians
(where Floyd was at the time), but they are for the most part
understandable. The biggest difference, to my ear, is that they sound
more aggressive in normal conversation than I'm used to as a native
Midwesterner.

>| Whatever, regional accents and dialectic differences in
>| how language is spoken and used are very real and are
>| not in any way a class distinction.
>|
>
> In my experience they're nothing but. Anyone who goes to
>colllege these days comes out with an Ohio-style, neutral
>accent.


That's as much hyperbolic as Floyd's comment. Some coming out of the
better eastern universities cultivate what would be called in the UK
"RP", or "Received Pronunciation" that is associated with the
upper-class. Some coming out of SEC universities strive to maintain
their southern accents as a mark of their own special culture and
charm.

There are some, of course, who do work at acquiring a more neutral
accent, but it's not as prevalent as you indicate. And, some who
should.

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Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Tony Cooper
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      03-18-2013
On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 21:47:34 -0800, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (Floyd L.
Davidson) wrote:

>>The Brooklyn, Bronx, New York accent being such that not a word could
>>be understood is, of course, hyperbole.

>
>Not so. I literally could not understand enough to
>carry on even a simple conversation. The one I remember
>was the first thing he said, which it turned out was
>something to the effect that we needed some "water".


There are words like "water" that vary greatly by the speaker's local
accent. It can be "waddah", "wadduh" or "warder". There's also "erl"
for "oil", "warsh" for "wash", and a number of other single words that
can be completely different from one speaker to the next.

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Tony Cooper - Orlando FL
 
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Usenet Account
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      03-18-2013
On 17/03/2013 10:07 PM, rwalker wrote:
> On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:46:42 -0400, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> But
>> enough people say that they find southern accents incomprehensible that I have
>> to believe them.
>>
>> Bob

>
>
> I've lived all over the U.S., and I think it's a bit of snobbery
> personally.
>

I recall seeing a bleak British movie filmed in some industrial city,
where the local dialect was used. The movie had English sub-titles
because nobody outside that region (even fellow Brits) could understand
half the dialog.

And then there are the Scots!!!

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James Silverton
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      03-18-2013
On 3/18/2013 8:37 AM, Usenet Account wrote:
> On 17/03/2013 10:07 PM, rwalker wrote:
>> On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:46:42 -0400, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>
>>> But
>>> enough people say that they find southern accents incomprehensible
>>> that I have
>>> to believe them.
>>>
>>> Bob

>>
>>
>> I've lived all over the U.S., and I think it's a bit of snobbery
>> personally.
>>

> I recall seeing a bleak British movie filmed in some industrial city,
> where the local dialect was used. The movie had English sub-titles
> because nobody outside that region (even fellow Brits) could understand
> half the dialog.
>
> And then there are the Scots!!!
>

It's not really as bad as you think! It just requires acclimatization
and attuning your ears but I agree a first time exposure might be helped
by subtitles. I went to college in Glasgow and could not understand
much for a few days but, after 4 or 5 days, I discovered I was beginning
to understand the people in the street and a week later it was not a
problem.

--
Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

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