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No one speaks english anymore??

 
 
Rob
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      03-15-2013
On 15/03/2013 2:51 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 23:21:00 -0400, Usenet Account
> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>> On 14/03/2013 10:57 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:46:12 -0400, Usenet Account
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 14/03/2013 1:55 AM, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:>
>>>>>
>>>>> Well English is an international language.English is a world wide
>>>>> language.Many people now a days understand English.There are many
>>>>> people learning English.


>>> What makes you think that the native speakers of Mandarin, Spanish,
>>> and the rest of the list do not also speak English?
>>>

>>
>> Many do, and many are multi-lingual. However the premise to the OP, aka
>> spammer was the entire World speaks English is flawed.

>
> Where do you get that? The OP said English is "an international
> language". It is. He said that English is "a world-wide language".
> It is.
>
> He didn't say that English is spoken exclusively internationally, or
> that English is the primary language of most people.
>


>


Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
conversation but I don't think either understood each other.


 
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Rob
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      03-15-2013
On 15/03/2013 3:15 PM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-14 21:02:40 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
>
>> On 15/03/2013 2:51 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>> On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 23:21:00 -0400, Usenet Account
>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>
>>>> On 14/03/2013 10:57 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
>>>>> On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:46:12 -0400, Usenet Account
>>>>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> On 14/03/2013 1:55 AM, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Well English is an international language.English is a world wide
>>>>>>> language.Many people now a days understand English.There are many
>>>>>>> people learning English.

>>
>>>>> What makes you think that the native speakers of Mandarin, Spanish,
>>>>> and the rest of the list do not also speak English?
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Many do, and many are multi-lingual. However the premise to the OP, aka
>>>> spammer was the entire World speaks English is flawed.
>>>
>>> Where do you get that? The OP said English is "an international
>>> language". It is. He said that English is "a world-wide language".
>>> It is.
>>>
>>> He didn't say that English is spoken exclusively internationally, or
>>> that English is the primary language of most people.
>>>

>>
>>>

>>
>> Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
>> dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation
>> they were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen
>> for a long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood
>> the conversation but I don't think either understood each other.

>
> You should try that with a cousin and his wife from Tennessee. My poor
> wife who was born in Cheltenham, UK, sat through three days of
> conversation, politely nodding her head without understanding a word
> spoken.
> ...and cousin D.M. and his wife Stella were convinced they were speaking
> English. I seriously doubt that anybody who lived outside of a ten mile
> radius of their home would believe that.
>



The French don't want to speak to Canadian French speaking people. Must
have been the war the French lost and still show hostilities.
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-15-2013
On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 23:21:00 -0400, Usenet Account <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: On 14/03/2013 10:57 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
: > On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:46:12 -0400, Usenet Account
: > <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >
: >> On 14/03/2013 1:55 AM, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:>
: >>>
: >>> Well English is an international language.English is a world wide
: >>> language.Many people now a days understand English.There are many
: >>> people learning English.There are many online free resources
: >>> http://youtu.be/Dmg7340f4Rk helping people to learn English.
: >>>
: >> facts don't seem to support that claim;
: >> TONGUE speakers %
: >> Mandarin 955M 14.10%
: >> Spanish 407M 5.85%
: >> English 365M 5.52%
: >> Hindi 311M 4.46%
: >> Arabic 293M 4.23%
: >> Portuguese 216M 3.08%
: >> Bengali 206M 3.05%
: >> Russian 160M 2.42%
: >> Japanese 127M 1.92%
: >> Punjabi 102M 1.44%
: >> German 92M 1.39%
: >> Javanese 82M 1.25%
: >> Wu 80M 1.20%
: >> Malay 77M 1.16%
: >> Telugu 76M 1.15%
: >> Vietnamese 76M 1.14%
: >> Korean 76M 1.14%
: >> French 74M 1.12%
: >
: > What makes you think that the native speakers of Mandarin, Spanish,
: > and the rest of the list do not also speak English?
: >
:
: Many do, and many are multi-lingual. However the premise to the OP, aka
: spammer was the entire World speaks English is flawed.

Well, it's "flawed" in the sense that it isn't literally true, but then the OP
never actually made that claim. And Tony's point is, if anything, an
understatement. Overwhelmingly, the second language of choice among native
speakers of other languages is English. There are areas of the world
(Scandanavia is one) where, at least in the cities, it's difficult to find
someone who doesn't speak English.

It has often been said, with some justification, that the one really good
thing that England did for India was compel a large segment of its people to
learn English.

Bob
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-15-2013
On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:02:40 +1100, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
: dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
: were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
: long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
: conversation but I don't think either understood each other.

Once at a hotel restaurant in Trondheim, Norway, the waitress addressed me in
English, but I decided to try out my 3-day-old Norwegian. She immediately
concluded that I didn't speak either language and smoothly switched to German.
I know enough German to grasp what she was saying, but I knew when I was
licked and reverted to English. The waitress didn't tell me I was crazy, but
I'm sure that's what she thought.

Bob
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-15-2013
On Thu, 14 Mar 2013 21:15:08 -0700, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
: On 2013-03-14 21:02:40 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
: > Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
: > dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
: > were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
: > long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
: > conversation but I don't think either understood each other.
:
: You should try that with a cousin and his wife from Tennessee. My poor
: wife who was born in Cheltenham, UK, sat through three days of
: conversation, politely nodding her head without understanding a word
: spoken.
: ...and cousin D.M. and his wife Stella were convinced they were
: speaking English. I seriously doubt that anybody who lived outside of a
: ten mile radius of their home would believe that.

I always laugh when I hear stories like that, because as a child of northern
parents who grew up in the south, I can switch seamlessly among several
northern and southern dialects and understand pretty much all of them. But
enough people say that they find southern accents incomprehensible that I have
to believe them.

Bob
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-15-2013
On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 02:14:41 -0700, Savageduck
<savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
: On 2013-03-15 01:00:51 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:
: > The French don't want to speak to Canadian French speaking people. Must
: > have been the war the French lost and still show hostilities.
:
: Most of the "Arcadians" ended up in Louisiana, and nobody understands them.

When my daughter was in prep school, she learned to speak fluent French. Some
years later, after her French had gotten a bit rusty from lack of use, she
found herself wandering around New Orleans, where her husband was attending a
convention. She decided to take a bus tour of the city, and there was a French
couple on the bus who spoke absolutely no English. They were under the
impression that in Louisiana *everyone* speaks French and that therefore
they'd have no problem. But it soon became clear that Betsy was the only one
on the bus who knew any French at all. So she traded seats so she could sit
beside the couple and did her best to translate the driver's spiel into
French. At one point Betsy was saying so little that the woman became
concerned that she wasn't getting the full picture, until Betsy explained that
most of what the driver was saying was translating the meanings of French
place names into English!

Bob
 
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Rikishi42
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      03-15-2013
On 2013-03-15, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:02:40 +1100, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>: Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
>: dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
>: were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
>: long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
>: conversation but I don't think either understood each other.
>
> Once at a hotel restaurant in Trondheim, Norway, the waitress addressed me in
> English, but I decided to try out my 3-day-old Norwegian. She immediately
> concluded that I didn't speak either language and smoothly switched to German.
> I know enough German to grasp what she was saying, but I knew when I was
> licked and reverted to English. The waitress didn't tell me I was crazy, but
> I'm sure that's what she thought.


In Belgium we have a Dutch speaking community, a French one and even a (very
small) German one. All official languages.

I allways marvel at French (from France, that is) people trying to find
their way to a city they know the French name of, while staring at road
signs that points to that place... in Dutch.



PS: Oh, and most of us speak English, too.

PPS: I once spend the evening with a Danish collegue, who introduced me to
her new English friend. At the end of the evening, he complimented me on my
English, but added I *did* have a Scottish accent. Aye, I du. To much Billy
Connolly in that period.

PPPS: Does anyone also find they adapt to the specific accent of the people
they talk to? I sound completely different when talking to someone from the
UK, the USA and - say - India.


--
When in doubt, use brute force.
-- Ken Thompson
 
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Robert Coe
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      03-16-2013
On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 11:57:12 +1300, Eric Stevens <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:
: On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:35:29 -0400, Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
:
: >On Fri, 15 Mar 2013 15:02:40 +1100, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
: >: Sitting in a restaurant in Switzerland a group of Japanese were in to
: >: dine. The waiter spoke German (Swiss dialect) so in this situation they
: >: were communicating in broken English, funniest thing I've seen for a
: >: long time of course I knew what they were saying and understood the
: >: conversation but I don't think either understood each other.
: >
: >Once at a hotel restaurant in Trondheim, Norway, the waitress addressed me in
: >English, but I decided to try out my 3-day-old Norwegian. She immediately
: >concluded that I didn't speak either language and smoothly switched to German.
: >I know enough German to grasp what she was saying, but I knew when I was
: >licked and reverted to English. The waitress didn't tell me I was crazy, but
: >I'm sure that's what she thought.
: >
: I am told the difference in the dialects from one part of Norway to
: another can be such that they use English as a common language. I do
: know that the English of most of the speakers there is impeccable.

There are two or three competing dialects of Norwegian, though I don't think
they differ enough to make them mutually unintelligible. To some extent,
they're maintained for political reasons, reflecting a split between those who
think it necessary to purge the language of all Swedish and Danish influence
and those who don't.

One reason I don't think intelligibility is an issue is that the Norwegians
told me that they have no difficulty understanding standard Swedish and
Danish. I tried to get them to say that the differences among the Scandinavian
languages (except, of course, Finnish) are comparable to the difference
between British and American English. They weren't willing to go that far, but
conceded that the premise would be more plausible if the pronunciation
differences between the two varieties of English were expressed in the
spelling of each to the degree that orthography tracks pronunciation in the
Scandinavian languages.

Bob
 
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MaxD
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      03-16-2013
On 3/15/2013 3:14 AM, Savageduck wrote:
> On 2013-03-15 01:00:51 -0700, Rob <(E-Mail Removed)> said:



>> The French don't want to speak to Canadian French speaking people.
>> Must have been the war the French lost and still show hostilities.

>
> Most of the "Arcadians" ended up in Louisiana, and nobody understands them.
>


excusez-moi!!

Max
 
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Wolfgang Weisselberg
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      03-16-2013
Robert Coe <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> On Wed, 13 Mar 2013 22:55:53 -0700 (PDT), (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>: Well English is an international language.English is a world wide
>: language.Many people now a days understand English.There are many
>: people learning English.There are many online free resources
>: http://SPAM/SPAM/SPAM/SPAM/ helping people to learn English.


> It's not obvious what your point is,


Spamming: Creating traffic for his URL. What else?

-Wolfgang
 
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