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Shutter delaty: digital newb requests advice

 
 
Michael Wright
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      12-21-2003
I used to do a lot of film photography (mostly with M Leicas).
After a decade without taking a picture, I thought I'd try again
with a little 3MB point-and-shoot (Olympus 350). The thing that
gets to me is that it is point, wait, wait and shoot. I guess I
could take up first pressure on the shutter release and
pre-focus, but I'd rather focus manually and have real control
over the moment of exposure.

Do I have to get a DSLR to be sure that if I miss the decisive
moment, it is my fault, or are there more affordable cameras
without this delay? It's not a problem I was expecting.

TIA for any advice

Michael

 
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Povl H. Pedersen
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      12-21-2003
On 2003-12-21, Michael Wright <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Do I have to get a DSLR to be sure that if I miss the decisive
> moment, it is my fault, or are there more affordable cameras
> without this delay? It's not a problem I was expecting.


I tried the Minolta S400 which supposedly is fast with < 0.2s
delay. The Canon EOS 300D (Digital Rebel for americans)feels way
better and faster, but is more expensive.

Digicams has the autofocus inside the lens (apart from Minolta S400
which also has external AF sensor). So you do not give the AF any
chance to work before before half-pressing shutter.

Shutter lag will almost disappear in consumer cams within 2 years,
given the camera is focused. All it takes from pressing the
button is just clearing the CCD.

You might now need DSLR, a Minolta A1 might be enough, og the new
Sony 828.

>
> TIA for any advice
>
> Michael
>

 
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Bill
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      12-21-2003
My Fuji S602 has almost no shutter lag. Not couniting autofocus time of
course, but that's pretty fast too. Or I can use manual focus and be ready
for the shot.

Bill
"Michael Wright" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bs3pm7$1la$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I used to do a lot of film photography (mostly with M Leicas).
> After a decade without taking a picture, I thought I'd try again
> with a little 3MB point-and-shoot (Olympus 350). The thing that
> gets to me is that it is point, wait, wait and shoot. I guess I
> could take up first pressure on the shutter release and
> pre-focus, but I'd rather focus manually and have real control
> over the moment of exposure.
>
> Do I have to get a DSLR to be sure that if I miss the decisive
> moment, it is my fault, or are there more affordable cameras
> without this delay? It's not a problem I was expecting.
>
> TIA for any advice
>
> Michael
>



 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      12-21-2003
Michael Wright wrote:

> I used to do a lot of film photography (mostly with M Leicas).
> After a decade without taking a picture, I thought I'd try again
> with a little 3MB point-and-shoot (Olympus 350). The thing that
> gets to me is that it is point, wait, wait and shoot. I guess I
> could take up first pressure on the shutter release and
> pre-focus, but I'd rather focus manually and have real control
> over the moment of exposure.
>
> Do I have to get a DSLR to be sure that if I miss the decisive
> moment, it is my fault, or are there more affordable cameras
> without this delay? It's not a problem I was expecting.


I'm not aware of a P&S on the market that has a lag similar
to 35mm film cameras. You need to stick with the SLRs to
avoid significant lag. The Canon and Nikon DSLRs all work
quite well, except don't get a D60 now that the 10D and
D-rebel are out.

Roger
Images and digital info at:
http://www.clarkvision.com

 
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Samuel Paik
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      12-21-2003
"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I'm not aware of a P&S on the market that has a lag similar
> to 35mm film cameras. You need to stick with the SLRs to
> avoid significant lag. The Canon and Nikon DSLRs all work
> quite well, except don't get a D60 now that the 10D and
> D-rebel are out.


There are some fixed-focus digital cameras.
 
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Bill
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      12-21-2003
Roger,
Did you read my reply to the orginal post?
Bill

"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Michael Wright wrote:
>
> > I used to do a lot of film photography (mostly with M Leicas).
> > After a decade without taking a picture, I thought I'd try again
> > with a little 3MB point-and-shoot (Olympus 350). The thing that
> > gets to me is that it is point, wait, wait and shoot. I guess I
> > could take up first pressure on the shutter release and
> > pre-focus, but I'd rather focus manually and have real control
> > over the moment of exposure.
> >
> > Do I have to get a DSLR to be sure that if I miss the decisive
> > moment, it is my fault, or are there more affordable cameras
> > without this delay? It's not a problem I was expecting.

>
> I'm not aware of a P&S on the market that has a lag similar
> to 35mm film cameras. You need to stick with the SLRs to
> avoid significant lag. The Canon and Nikon DSLRs all work
> quite well, except don't get a D60 now that the 10D and
> D-rebel are out.
>
> Roger
> Images and digital info at:
> http://www.clarkvision.com
>



 
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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      12-21-2003
Bill wrote:

> Roger,
> Did you read my reply to the orginal post?
> Bill


Bill wrote:
> My Fuji S602 has almost no shutter lag. Not couniting autofocus time of
> course, but that's pretty fast too. Or I can use manual focus and be ready
> for the shot.


Yes. But modern cameras (even SLRs) have very poor focusing
screens, so manual focus is usually not very accurate at best.
For older people, or people with eye problems, like astigmatism,
manual focus will only mean out of focus most of the time.
In many situations, like children or pets at play, autofocus
is critical (especially with the poor visual focusing screens).
For real action (wildlife, sports) fast autofocus is mandatory.
One really wants a camera that will focus fast, determine the
exposure and aperture and trip the shutter in as little time
as possible. A value near 0.1 second is great. A half, one, even
two seconds seems common. In standard tests, what is the D602?

Roger



 
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Jim Waggener
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      12-21-2003
> Yes. But modern cameras (even SLRs) have very poor focusing
> screens, so manual focus is usually not very accurate at best.
> For older people, or people with eye problems, like astigmatism,
> manual focus will only mean out of focus most of the time.
> In many situations, like children or pets at play, autofocus
> is critical (especially with the poor visual focusing screens).
> For real action (wildlife, sports) fast autofocus is mandatory.
> One really wants a camera that will focus fast, determine the
> exposure and aperture and trip the shutter in as little time
> as possible. A value near 0.1 second is great. A half, one, even
> two seconds seems common. In standard tests, what is the D602?
>
> Roger


Depends on the camera Roger. There are many different screens available for
the Nikon's.. from the F to F4. Very easily changed. Diopters for the view
finder as well. But you know that .

Jim




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Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)
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      12-21-2003
Jim Waggener wrote:

> > Yes. But modern cameras (even SLRs) have very poor focusing
> > screens, so manual focus is usually not very accurate at best.
> > For older people, or people with eye problems, like astigmatism,
> > manual focus will only mean out of focus most of the time.
> > In many situations, like children or pets at play, autofocus
> > is critical (especially with the poor visual focusing screens).
> > For real action (wildlife, sports) fast autofocus is mandatory.
> > One really wants a camera that will focus fast, determine the
> > exposure and aperture and trip the shutter in as little time
> > as possible. A value near 0.1 second is great. A half, one, even
> > two seconds seems common. In standard tests, what is the D602?
> >
> > Roger

>
> Depends on the camera Roger. There are many different screens available for
> the Nikon's.. from the F to F4. Very easily changed. Diopters for the view
> finder as well. But you know that .


I'm not sure about modern Nikons, but while in many Canon EOS film
cameras you could change screens, in the Canon 10D, D10, d-rebel,
you can't (I'mm 99% sure--someone correct me if this is wrong).
I know of no P&S cameras where you can change the focusing screen
(at least officially--one might be able to hack it, but I generally
don't use a band saw on my cameras!).

Roger

 
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Bill
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      12-26-2003
Well it's the S602 (not D602)...Well for those with vision problems there is
a very useable diopter on the S602. And although I don't know what the test
speeds are, I would suggest that for wildlife and/or sports, etc. one should
use the continuous shooting mode. That way the camera need only focus for
the first shot. Again, the S602 is one of the fastest cameras in this mode.
Because of Fuji's unique CCD architecture, the chip allows the image data to
be read very quickly. (Also why this is one of the few still cams able to do
VGA size movies (640x480) at 30 fps.). It also has a unique continuous
shooting mode that lets you hold down the shutter button to keep shooting
until you get the shot you want. Then let go of the shutter button and the
last 5 frames are saved to memory card.

Bill



"Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
message news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Bill wrote:
>
> > Roger,
> > Did you read my reply to the orginal post?
> > Bill

>
> Bill wrote:
> > My Fuji S602 has almost no shutter lag. Not couniting autofocus time of
> > course, but that's pretty fast too. Or I can use manual focus and be

ready
> > for the shot.

>
> Yes. But modern cameras (even SLRs) have very poor focusing
> screens, so manual focus is usually not very accurate at best.
> For older people, or people with eye problems, like astigmatism,
> manual focus will only mean out of focus most of the time.
> In many situations, like children or pets at play, autofocus
> is critical (especially with the poor visual focusing screens).
> For real action (wildlife, sports) fast autofocus is mandatory.
> One really wants a camera that will focus fast, determine the
> exposure and aperture and trip the shutter in as little time
> as possible. A value near 0.1 second is great. A half, one, even
> two seconds seems common. In standard tests, what is the D602?
>
> Roger
>
>
>



 
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