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How do you deal with the EOS300d limitations?

 
 
Marc Libom
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2003
> Regardless, if he wants a polite answer, he should learn to ask
> polite questions. Nobody is obligated to help him.
>
> If you make a sincere attempt to help someone who posts inflammatory
> questions, then you're a better man than most - but you shouldn't hold
> everyone to your standards. Mostly, people reap what they sow, and
> asking provocative questions is just dumb if you want helpful answers.


Hi Dave, one thing is, that everybody here should accept, not everbody else
has to be so proud on the Canon products, there is really no need to defend
them so much, as they were holy. The Rebel is a fantastic entry cam into the
dSLR market, but it's very limitited also (regardless, if these limitations
matter for one self).

But more important: please note that internet is international. I recognised
that people from all over the world do postings here and not everybody has
English as mother language (including me). I know that dictionaries
sometimes can be very confusing therefor offending or bothering words like
"awful" can just be a wrong take out of a dictionary.


 
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Dave Martindale
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2003
"Marc Libom" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:

>Hi Dave, one thing is, that everybody here should accept, not everbody else
>has to be so proud on the Canon products, there is really no need to defend
>them so much, as they were holy. The Rebel is a fantastic entry cam into the
>dSLR market, but it's very limitited also (regardless, if these limitations
>matter for one self).


All true. But it's human nature to lash back when you feel attacked.
The same thing would happen if the posting had mentioned a Nikon camera
instead (though perhaps there would be fewer replies).

>But more important: please note that internet is international. I recognised
>that people from all over the world do postings here and not everybody has
>English as mother language (including me). I know that dictionaries
>sometimes can be very confusing therefor offending or bothering words like
>"awful" can just be a wrong take out of a dictionary.


Good point.

Dave
 
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Charles Robinson
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      12-18-2003
Tony Spadaro <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
:
: I would have studied the specs before putting down the money. If you are
: dorky enough to buy without study, don't assume everyone else is as stupid
: as you. The fact is, few are, and few ever will be.

Man... my killfile is getting larger every day. Bye bye!

-Charles

--
Charles Robinson
Eagan, MN
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed)
http://www.visi.com/~charlesr
 
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R2D2
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      12-18-2003
"Thomas Frost" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:3fdf1240$0$280$(E-Mail Removed):

> The EOS300d is a good but ambivalently camera as it has a - for dSLR -
> very low price, but extremly limitations too, that are discussed here
> a lot, especially with the users of the competing and much better
> featured A1.
>
> As I am interested in buying a EOS300d, my question is now how you,
> the EOS300d users, deal with these bad limitations like the non
> adjustable flash intensity, the inability to use the AF mode you want
> or need and the mega awful missing of user configurations which spoils
> this actually good camera mostly. Do you found any useful work-arounds
> to make these worse things a little better?
>
>


The 300D is a plastic piece of crap with no mirror lockup. If you can
afford it, buy the 1Ds. If not, the 10D is comparable to the Elan film SLR.
 
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R2D2
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-18-2003
"Michael" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in
news:3fdf2f8d$1_2@127.0.0.1:

> I may be a novice here, but I bought the Digital Rebel for it's entry
> level position in the SLR market. If you are a renown photographer,
> why in the hell would you be looking at this model? Whip out the
> wallet man and buy the 10d. Don't be cheap!



The 300d is a consumer DSLR. The 10D is a prosumer DSLR. If he is a 'renown
photographer' (in your words) he should be buying the 1Ds. If he can not
afford that, he should stick with film if he expects pro results.
 
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Tony Spadaro
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      12-18-2003
Good riddance!

--
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com
home of The Camera-ist's Manifesto
The Improved Links Pages are at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/links/mlinks00.html
A sample chapter from my novel "Haight-Ashbury" is at
http://www.chapelhillnoir.com/writ/hait/hatitl.html
"Charles Robinson" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:3fe21889$0$41296$(E-Mail Removed) ...
> Tony Spadaro <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> :
> : I would have studied the specs before putting down the money. If you are
> : dorky enough to buy without study, don't assume everyone else is as

stupid
> : as you. The fact is, few are, and few ever will be.
>
> Man... my killfile is getting larger every day. Bye bye!
>
> -Charles
>
> --
> Charles Robinson
> Eagan, MN
> (E-Mail Removed)
> http://www.visi.com/~charlesr



 
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Kevin McMurtrie
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2003
In article <3fdf1240$0$280$(E-Mail Removed)>,
"Thomas Frost" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> The EOS300d is a good but ambivalently camera as it has a - for dSLR - very
> low price, but extremly limitations too, that are discussed here a lot,
> especially with the users of the competing and much better featured A1.
>
> As I am interested in buying a EOS300d, my question is now how you, the
> EOS300d users, deal with these bad limitations like the non adjustable flash
> intensity, the inability to use the AF mode you want or need and the mega
> awful missing of user configurations which spoils this actually good camera
> mostly. Do you found any useful work-arounds to make these worse things a
> little better?
>
>


Whether or not to use backlighting when the flash is on is a compromise
all cameras must make. Too much flash causes harsh lighting while too
little flash causes colored motion blur. The 300D's point of sucking is
that there's no simple control to adjust the level of compromise. I'd
like to reduce the power a lot while indoors.

There are ways around the lack of backlighting. The nighttime dummy
mode uses backlighting. Like any camera you can use the shutter
priority mode to force an exposure that's longer than the flash
interval, or even M mode to force reduced flash fill power.


AF works well in the default modes so it's not an issue. The occasional
75% exposure would be my only other gripe.
 
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Thomas Frost
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      12-19-2003
> But more important: please note that internet is international. I
recognised
> that people from all over the world do postings here and not everybody has
> English as mother language (including me). I know that dictionaries
> sometimes can be very confusing therefor offending or bothering words like
> "awful" can just be a wrong take out of a dictionary.


Yes, Marc is right. I am not really good in English and after the trouble I
maybe caused, I just want to say that I meant something like "nerve
hitting", so things, that again and again can drive you crazy in daily use.
So probably awful was the wrong word for it. Sorry.

I am a little astonished, that so many postings deal with if I used the
wrong words or if I am too stupid to buy a digital SLR camera, but
unfortunately not many answer my questions. Regarding AF I got some useful
hints, but to buy an external flash is no alternative for the integrated
flash. With the unability to adjust it a little and the inability to synch
on the 2. shutter activity, Canon probably better let the internal flash out
of the Rebel. Better not to bother the customer and this would be a clearer
distance to the 10D.

Now I understand, why these limitations are there and that many of them
doesn't really matter to most of the users. But what's still on the list is,
the missing mirror lookup. I think this is essential even for an entry SLR.
Does anybody knows, if the entry analog Canon SLR (analog Rebel) didn't
provide this feature also? This is the point which is so hard for me to
understand, because only the mirror lookup enables me to really control the
exposure and image appearance. What helps the much much better optical view
finder of the Rebel, if the prosumer cams (like A1 to name only one) really
have wysiwyg on their maybe unsharper and little grainy displays or EVF.
What is the advantage of the Rebel's OVF in comparison with an EVF, when
there is no mirror lookup?




 
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David J. Littleboy
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2003

"Thomas Frost" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> Now I understand, why these limitations are there and that many of them
> doesn't really matter to most of the users. But what's still on the list

is,
> the missing mirror lookup. I think this is essential even for an entry

SLR.
> Does anybody knows, if the entry analog Canon SLR (analog Rebel) didn't
> provide this feature also?


I don't know the term "mirror lookup": I do know the term "mirror lockup".

Most entry level and many mid-range film SLRs do _not_ provide mirror
lockup. The better ones provide a 2-second setting on the self timer: the
mirror goes up when you hit the release, and the shutter goes off 2 seconds
later. With the Rebel, you have to wait the full 10 seconds.

> This is the point which is so hard for me to
> understand, because only the mirror lookup enables me to really control

the
> exposure and image appearance. What helps the much much better optical

view
> finder of the Rebel, if the prosumer cams (like A1 to name only one)

really
> have wysiwyg on their maybe unsharper and little grainy displays or EVF.
> What is the advantage of the Rebel's OVF in comparison with an EVF, when
> there is no mirror lookup?


Huh? Mirror lockup has nothing to do with "controlling the exposure and
image appearance". It's so that the vibration of the mirror doesn't soften
the picture. It is only used when taking pictures on a tripod at speeds
between 1/15 and 5 seconds or so. Outside that range, it's not really
necessary.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan


 
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Chris Brown
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-19-2003
In article <3fe2ade1$0$261$(E-Mail Removed)>,
Thomas Frost <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>Now I understand, why these limitations are there and that many of them
>doesn't really matter to most of the users. But what's still on the list is,
>the missing mirror lookup. I think this is essential even for an entry SLR.


Assuming you mean mirror *lockup*, Why? The only time I ever use mirror
lockup on my 10D is for short exposures using an extreme telephoto lens on a
tripod, where it can be useful for countering any slight camera-shake caused
by mirror-bounce. Is there some other funderemntal use for locking up the
mirror which is less obvious?

>Does anybody knows, if the entry analog Canon SLR (analog Rebel) didn't
>provide this feature also? This is the point which is so hard for me to
>understand, because only the mirror lookup enables me to really control the
>exposure and image appearance.


Huh? Mirror lockup has nothing to do with exposure.
 
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