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CompactFlash Cards; Temperature and Altitude limits?

 
 
David J Taylor
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      12-14-2003

"Ron Hunter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
[]
> Not only is it a semiconductor device, but it is completely enclosed in
> a resin. I can't see any logical reason why it wouldn't work in vacuum.
> Anyone want to try an experiment?


There will be other components as well as the semiconductors. Is the
casing pressurised? I guess not. Some SanDisk products are rated to
80,000 feet.

David


 
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Bill
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      12-14-2003
Besides atmosphetic pressure, there is also more ambient radiation at high
altitudes........UV, ions and other forms. Perhaps they could interfere with
some electronics. I'm no scientist, but it's a thought.

Bill

"Digitalis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news(E-Mail Removed)...
> On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 23:29:53 +1100, Paul wrote:
>
> >> My son does quite a bit of snow camping, skiing and other cold

temperature
> >> activities. I notice that the Operating temperature specification for

most
> >> CompactFlash cards is typically about 0-60 degrees C.
> >>
> >> Does anyone know of CompactFlash cards with an extended lower

temperature
> >> range?

>
> I once asked an electronics specialist (he designed circuit boards,
> etc.) why so much electronics is rated only to 0 degrees C. His answer
> was that the manufacturer probably just did not bother to certify it for
> lower temperature- it was an arbitrary number. Nothing special about it
> at all. Keep in mind that tolerances do change somewhat with
> temperature, but silicon is not water it *won't* freeze at 0 degrees C!
>
> In fact, electronics rated at 0 degrees C might operate fine at lower
> temperatures. Personally, I've operated cameras and other electronic
> devices below 0 degrees C with no real issues, just like someone else
> here.
>
>
> >> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it

safe
> >> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

>
> Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.
>
>
>



 
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Ron Hunter
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      12-14-2003
David J Taylor wrote:
> "Ron Hunter" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> []
>
>>Not only is it a semiconductor device, but it is completely enclosed in
>>a resin. I can't see any logical reason why it wouldn't work in vacuum.
>> Anyone want to try an experiment?

>
>
> There will be other components as well as the semiconductors. Is the
> casing pressurised? I guess not. Some SanDisk products are rated to
> 80,000 feet.
>
> David
>
>

I have not dismantled a CF card, but it appears that the circuits are
'potted', ie., sealed in plastic.
 
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Ryan Pfleger
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      12-14-2003
I've used a digital camera and CF cards above 14,000 ft, and I've seen
digital photography from Everest. That should be high enough for ya.
Sandisk does make an "Extreme" CF card which has a larger temperature range
and higher shock rating. I would think as long as you're using Type I CF
that you don't need to worry about it, they seem burly enough already.

Ryan

"Bill" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:gXXCb.1486$ti2.83@lakeread03...
> Besides atmosphetic pressure, there is also more ambient radiation at high
> altitudes........UV, ions and other forms. Perhaps they could interfere

with
> some electronics. I'm no scientist, but it's a thought.
>
> Bill
>
> "Digitalis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news(E-Mail Removed)...
> > On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 23:29:53 +1100, Paul wrote:
> >
> > >> My son does quite a bit of snow camping, skiing and other cold

> temperature
> > >> activities. I notice that the Operating temperature specification

for
> most
> > >> CompactFlash cards is typically about 0-60 degrees C.
> > >>
> > >> Does anyone know of CompactFlash cards with an extended lower

> temperature
> > >> range?

> >
> > I once asked an electronics specialist (he designed circuit boards,
> > etc.) why so much electronics is rated only to 0 degrees C. His answer
> > was that the manufacturer probably just did not bother to certify it for
> > lower temperature- it was an arbitrary number. Nothing special about it
> > at all. Keep in mind that tolerances do change somewhat with
> > temperature, but silicon is not water it *won't* freeze at 0 degrees C!
> >
> > In fact, electronics rated at 0 degrees C might operate fine at lower
> > temperatures. Personally, I've operated cameras and other electronic
> > devices below 0 degrees C with no real issues, just like someone else
> > here.
> >
> >
> > >> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it

> safe
> > >> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

> >
> > Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.
> >
> >
> >

>
>



 
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Junque
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      12-14-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Digitalis
<(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>>> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it safe
>>> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

>
>Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.


It is not the altitude but reduced heat transfer in thinner air that can
result in overheating.
--
Ian G8ILZ
- to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
 
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Junque
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-14-2003
In article <gXXCb.1486$ti2.83@lakeread03>, Bill <(E-Mail Removed)>
writes
>Besides atmosphetic pressure, there is also more ambient radiation at high
>altitudes........UV, ions and other forms. Perhaps they could interfere with
>some electronics. I'm no scientist, but it's a thought.
>
>Bill
>
>"Digitalis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news(E-Mail Removed).. .
>> On Thu, 11 Dec 2003 23:29:53 +1100, Paul wrote:
>>
>> >> My son does quite a bit of snow camping, skiing and other cold

>temperature
>> >> activities. I notice that the Operating temperature specification for

>most
>> >> CompactFlash cards is typically about 0-60 degrees C.
>> >>
>> >> Does anyone know of CompactFlash cards with an extended lower

>temperature
>> >> range?

>>
>> I once asked an electronics specialist (he designed circuit boards,
>> etc.) why so much electronics is rated only to 0 degrees C. His answer
>> was that the manufacturer probably just did not bother to certify it for
>> lower temperature- it was an arbitrary number. Nothing special about it
>> at all. Keep in mind that tolerances do change somewhat with
>> temperature, but silicon is not water it *won't* freeze at 0 degrees C!
>>
>> In fact, electronics rated at 0 degrees C might operate fine at lower
>> temperatures. Personally, I've operated cameras and other electronic
>> devices below 0 degrees C with no real issues, just like someone else
>> here.
>>
>>
>> >> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it

>safe
>> >> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

>>
>> Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.


You would have to go to rather more than 10,000 ft for ionizing
radiation to become a problem.

--
Ian G8ILZ
- to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
 
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Povl H. Pedersen
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-14-2003
On 2003-12-14, Junque <Junque@127.0.0.1> wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Digitalis
><(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>>>> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it safe
>>>> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

>>
>>Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.

>
> It is not the altitude but reduced heat transfer in thinner air that can
> result in overheating.


But the temperature drops 5 degress for each 1 km altitude, which will
compensate some. I know IBM Microsodrives will fail in the high pressure
under water, and will have problem if you go much above 10.000 ft
 
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Andy Williams
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      12-14-2003
Povl H. Pedersen wrote:

> I know IBM Microsodrives will ... problem if you go much above 10.000 ft


It seems this myth is pervasive.
--
Andy Williams
 
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Junque
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      12-14-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Povl H.
Pedersen <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>On 2003-12-14, Junque <Junque@127.0.0.1> wrote:
>> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Digitalis
>><(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>>>>> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is it safe
>>>>> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?
>>>
>>>Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.

>>
>> It is not the altitude but reduced heat transfer in thinner air that can
>> result in overheating.

>
>But the temperature drops 5 degress for each 1 km altitude, which will
>compensate some.


Temperature is not heat transfer.

--
Ian G8ILZ
- to reply directly use ian (at) newbrain (dot) demon (dot) co (dot) uk
 
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Ron Hunter
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-15-2003
Junque wrote:
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Digitalis
> <(E-Mail Removed)> writes
>
>>>> Similarly, none of the specs I've found even mention altitude. Is
>>>> it safe
>>>> to assume that all/most are good up to 14,000 feet?

>>
>>
>> Electronics is sensitive to altitude since when? Any examples? Thanks.

>
>
> It is not the altitude but reduced heat transfer in thinner air that can
> result in overheating.


Since the temperature decreases as one goes higher, I wouldn't think
head in a camera would be a problem.
 
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