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Wedding photography versus altitude

 
 
Patrick L.
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      12-01-2003
The other day, I was at a photo lab, one that professes to be a pro lab. I
was waiting for the fellow (who was the owner) behind the counter to finish
with another customer, but I overheard his reply to the customer who asked
him if he did weddings -- a reply which exuded the unmistakable aura of
condescension regarding wedding photography. He said "I don't do wedding
photography", with a big frown and accent on the word 'do', as if those who
do this type of photography are in some kind of diminutive class.


I realize wedding photography does not have the glamour and probably not as
much excitement as photojournalism, but I was really offended by his
comment, especially since a good part of his photo processing business comes
from wedding photographers.

Have any of you wedding shooters out their come across this attitude with
other types of photographers?

And how many of you would rather be into some other type of photography, but
do weddings solely for the bread and butter aspect? I can respect the
latter, since it sure as hell beats flipping burgers.

I'll tell you what I like about weddings.

They are happy, joyous affairs (usually).

Free food, usually pretty good.

I"ve found most brides and grooms easy to please, which, as I understand it,
is not the case with magazine photo editors.

Pay is good.

Exposure to different cultures (and I find the sociological &
anthropological aspects of weddings from one culture to another, very
interesting).

It's all about people, moments, memories, and the fact that, when all is
done with the wedding, my work is going to stay with that family for a long
time (unless they get divorced, of course). So if you love shooting
people, this is a good thing.

In many other types of photography (excluding art-in-museums stuff), your
work is seen by the public not in their original print form, but in
magazines, books, brochures, billboards, etc. This is not the case with
wedding photography.

And here is what I really like about it, and that is the fact that in a
fast paced environment, you must be able to summons forth anything and
everything you have learned about the subject, and apply your knowledge
quickly, so this environment is very good for honing one's skill.

But, alas, there is one big thing I don't like about it: The fact that the
only people to whom your work has real meaning are the bride, groom, and
their family.

Well, nothing in this world lets you have it all.


Patrick


 
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zbzbzb
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      12-01-2003
>
>I'll tell you what I like about weddings.
>
>They are happy, joyous affairs (usually).
>
>Free food, usually pretty good.
>
>I"ve found most brides and grooms easy to please, which, as I understand it,
>is not the case with magazine photo editors.
>
>Pay is good.
>
>Exposure to different cultures (and I find the sociological &
>anthropological aspects of weddings from one culture to another, very
>interesting).
>
>It's all about people, moments, memories, and the fact that, when all is
>done with the wedding, my work is going to stay


I find most weddings sad in the sense that more effort usually goes into
preparing for a wedding and everything that it represents, in addition to other
superficial things and events, instead of what it takes to sustain and nuture a
marriage.


 
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Robertwgross
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      12-01-2003
Patrick, there are many technical types of photographers who disdain some of
the artistic aspects of photography. A wedding photographer has to have some of
the technical skills, some of the artistic skills, AND THEN has to be good
dealing with people. This especially includes brides on their wedding day. Some
brides tend to be really nervous and show great paranoia about anything bad
that could possibly happen. For this reason, many photographers simply opt out.
I've seen some supposedly professional photographers who screwed up big time on
a wedding shoot, and that affects their business for quite a while.

At one of the last weddings that I shot, the father of the bride was half-drunk
by the time we got to shooting the formal poses. That made it difficult, but
somewhat entertaining.

---Bob Gross---
 
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Alan Browne
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      12-01-2003


I don't DO photo-newgroup wedding discussions.



Your 'pro' should not act so negatively, but rather network and refer to
a list of colleagues/competitors who do DO weddings. Referrals have a
habit of generating back-referals for whatever area he does DO.

Cheers,
Alan.








Patrick L. wrote:

> The other day, I was at a photo lab, one that professes to be a pro lab. I
> was waiting for the fellow (who was the owner) behind the counter to finish
> with another customer, but I overheard his reply to the customer who asked
> him if he did weddings -- a reply which exuded the unmistakable aura of
> condescension regarding wedding photography. He said "I don't do wedding
> photography", with a big frown and accent on the word 'do', as if those who
> do this type of photography are in some kind of diminutive class.
>



--
e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.

 
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Ray Murphy
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      12-01-2003

----------
In article <DBMyb.23721$(E-Mail Removed) k.net>,
"Patrick L." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:


>The other day, I was at a photo lab, one that professes to be a pro lab. I
>was waiting for the fellow (who was the owner) behind the counter to finish
>with another customer, but I overheard his reply to the customer who asked
>him if he did weddings -- a reply which exuded the unmistakable aura of
>condescension regarding wedding photography. He said "I don't do wedding
>photography", with a big frown and accent on the word 'do', as if those who
>do this type of photography are in some kind of diminutive class.
>
>
>I realize wedding photography does not have the glamour and probably not as
>much excitement as photojournalism, but I was really offended by his
>comment, especially since a good part of his photo processing business comes
>from wedding photographers.
>
>Have any of you wedding shooters out their come across this attitude with
>other types of photographers?
>
>And how many of you would rather be into some other type of photography, but
>do weddings solely for the bread and butter aspect? I can respect the
>latter, since it sure as hell beats flipping burgers.


RM: It's an interesting topic you've brought up, but hey don't be
concerned about it. You must know by now that photography attracts a
lot of fruitcakes who gravitate towards the art in order to express
thieir pedantic nature.
It's just a vehicle for expressing expertise - often for less-educated
people who have difficulty in surviving in the real world with their
particular personalities.

Personally I've never encountered a difficult wedding photographer,
but have been very impressed with the two major qualities which they
display -- a great way with people and a high standard of work. Some
of them are quite outstanding individuals and contribute a lot to
society in a very direct way.

Sure, some of the lesser wedding photographers are a bit bossy, but
they are still motivated to "get it right" which is an admirable
quality if not taken to extremes.

I cannot imagine too many wedding photographers surviving in the
business if they were not reasonably good overall.

As I said before, don't be concerned. You are in a very respectable
line of business - even if a few colleagues DO cut a few corners and
overcharge.

But getting back to the neurotic character you mentioned -- yes,
there's a lot of them around, so you need to be on the ball and ready
with some stock answers before you go into their shop or lab etc.

If you miss your opportunity to have your say - go back when customers
are present and do it )


Ray

[other newsgroups omitted]







 
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Charlie Dilks
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      12-01-2003
I would say that wedding photography should be done below 13,000 feet.
--
Charlie Dilks
Newark, DE USA
 
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Ken Hart
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      12-01-2003

"Patrick L." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
newsBMyb.23721$(E-Mail Removed) hlink.net...
> The other day, I was at a photo lab, one that professes to be a pro lab.

I
> was waiting for the fellow (who was the owner) behind the counter to

finish
> with another customer, but I overheard his reply to the customer who asked
> him if he did weddings -- a reply which exuded the unmistakable aura of
> condescension regarding wedding photography. He said "I don't do wedding
> photography", with a big frown and accent on the word 'do', as if those

who
> do this type of photography are in some kind of diminutive class.
>
>
> I realize wedding photography does not have the glamour and probably not

as
> much excitement as photojournalism, but I was really offended by his
> comment, especially since a good part of his photo processing business

comes
> from wedding photographers.
>
> Have any of you wedding shooters out their come across this attitude with
> other types of photographers?
>
> And how many of you would rather be into some other type of photography,

but
> do weddings solely for the bread and butter aspect? I can respect the
> latter, since it sure as hell beats flipping burgers.
>
> I'll tell you what I like about weddings.


And I'll tell you what I don't like about weddings!
>
> They are happy, joyous affairs (usually).

Everyone in the wedding is stressed out because they have to have everything
"just perfect"
>
> Free food, usually pretty good.

Cheap food, usually cooked last week and very dry.
>
> I"ve found most brides and grooms easy to please, which, as I understand

it,
> is not the case with magazine photo editors.

Most brides' mothers can be a real PITA at the wedding, and if you miss a
photo of Uncle Edgar (who spent the wedding in the car listening to the game
on the radio), they want you to re-create the entire day, or refund
everything.
>
> Pay is good.

When you include all your time (sorting negs, putting albums together, etc),
it ain't that good.
>
> Exposure to different cultures (and I find the sociological &
> anthropological aspects of weddings from one culture to another, very
> interesting).

I concede this point-- depends on your location.
>
> It's all about people, moments, memories, and the fact that, when all is
> done with the wedding, my work is going to stay with that family for a

long
> time (unless they get divorced, of course). So if you love shooting
> people, this is a good thing.

The same can be said for studio portraits, except that you don't have the
travel and pressure.
>
> In many other types of photography (excluding art-in-museums stuff), your
> work is seen by the public not in their original print form, but in
> magazines, books, brochures, billboards, etc. This is not the case with
> wedding photography.
>
> And here is what I really like about it, and that is the fact that in a
> fast paced environment, you must be able to summons forth anything and
> everything you have learned about the subject, and apply your knowledge
> quickly, so this environment is very good for honing one's skill.

I'll conceded that point-- I prefer to work in a more relaxed, structured
environment.
>
> But, alas, there is one big thing I don't like about it: The fact that

the
> only people to whom your work has real meaning are the bride, groom, and
> their family.
>
> Well, nothing in this world lets you have it all.
>
>
> Patrick
>

If you enjoy wedding photography, more power to you! For me, I consider it
too much time, too much hassle, not enough money, not enough opportunity to
get really creative.
The only wedding I really enjoyed shooting was my nephew's. He and his bride
hired a wedding photographer, and I just took pictures for myself.

Ken


 
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Enough
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2003
In article <DBMyb.23721$(E-Mail Removed) k.net>,
"Patrick L." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I'll tell you what I like about weddings.


****ing the bride (or groom)?

--
Enough <(E-Mail Removed)>
 
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Bob Ford
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-01-2003
On Mon, 01 Dec 2003 19:26:27 GMT, "Patrick L." <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>The other day, I was at a photo lab, one that professes to be a pro lab. I
>was waiting for the fellow (who was the owner) behind the counter to finish
>with another customer, but I overheard his reply to the customer who asked
>him if he did weddings -- a reply which exuded the unmistakable aura of
>condescension regarding wedding photography. He said "I don't do wedding
>photography", with a big frown and accent on the word 'do', as if those who
>do this type of photography are in some kind of diminutive class.
>
>
>I realize wedding photography does not have the glamour and probably not as
>much excitement as photojournalism, but I was really offended by his
>comment, especially since a good part of his photo processing business comes
>from wedding photographers.
>
>Have any of you wedding shooters out their come across this attitude with
>other types of photographers?


<<big snip>>
Patrick:
I have been doing video for the last 20 years but prior to that I
worked at still photography but only part time.
I can't count how many weddings I have shot, for myself and before
that as a stringer for several local studios.
Yes, I have encountered this attitude many times and my usual answer
used to be "you don't like shooting weddings" because you don't know
how.

Sure everbody wants everything to be perfect - wouldn't you if it was
your wedding or your childs wedding? Yes the brides mother can be a
real pain in the ass, not to mention "Queen for a Day" the bride but I
found that if you keep your attitude in the right place, most people
will come around and be cordial.
I suspect that people in general are harder to deal with today than
when I was shooting weddings, especially the brides. We now have a
generation of totally spoiled brats so if I were in that biz today I
might have a different opinion about it.

It's not enough to know how to shoot the pics - if you have a decent
knowledge about social ettiquette you can be a real help to people.
I used to be amazed at how many people don't know which side to pin
the flowers on the men. I knew where and not only that I knew a really
slick little way to put them on quickly and they stayed in place.

God forbid but I also used to shoot little leaguers but even that can
be pleasant depending on your own attitude.

Bottom line is these jobs all PAY MONEY and it is very difficult to
move up into higher ranks of photo work.

I have a very unique video business in that I tape dance conventions
and have been doing so for 20 years. Many of my peers look down on my
chosen field but bottom line is I make money at it. Would I like to do
commercials or be a news shooter or editor? Of course but here again
it is very difficult to move up into that level and it takes MEGA
BUCKS for equipment to do so. Interesting thing is there are only 2
companies on the West Coast that do the type of work I do - it not
only takes technical video skills but also a knowledge of dance to do
it properly.

I don't do video weddings because it is much harder work than doing
stills and I make more money at what I do.

I normally don't answer things on the photo groups but your subject
caught my attention. If you are good at what you do, make no apologies
for your chosen field and just continue depositing your payments into
your bank account

Good luck.
Bob Ford
Images In Motion
<www.imagesinmotion.com>
 
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Charlie Self
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      12-01-2003
Bob Ford writes:

>It's not enough to know how to shoot the pics - if you have a decent
>knowledge about social ettiquette you can be a real help to people.
>I used to be amazed at how many people don't know which side to pin
>the flowers on the men. I knew where and not only that I knew a really
>slick little way to put them on quickly and they stayed in place.


That attitude, along with reasonable photo skills, can keep anyone going a long
time.

And if the attitude isn't enough, I've known wedding photographers who do a lot
better financially than most journalist shooters. More glamour to the j-camera,
but unless you're on a big town paper or a bit tmie magazine, the money tends
to not be so great.

Wedding photographers are limited primarily by the amount of time they wish to
spend working, and their skills.

Charlie Self

"I have as much authority as the Pope, I just don't have as many people who
believe it." George Carlin




















 
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