Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > MOST USEFUL Computer Language

Reply
Thread Tools

MOST USEFUL Computer Language

 
 
English Teacher
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
What would be the most useful language to learn among:

Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Kent Paul Dolan
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
"English Teacher" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> What would be the most useful language to learn among:
> Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?


Please when you start religious wars, keep crossposting to a minimum;
how can you possibly think all those rec.* groups would be interested
in the answer?

xanthian.

[And what language is "most useful" depends entirely on what tasks
you want to do with it.]



--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Bill Godfrey
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
(Followups to comp.programming only.)

http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (English Teacher) wrote:
> What would be the most useful language to learn among:
> Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?


It depends what you want to do. Each of these languages (arguably) have
thier niche.

What do you want to do? I can't think of a programming task that
encompasses woodwork, photography technique, 35mm cameras and computer
theory.

Unless you want to build a robot with a built in 35mm camera that knows
about composition and light levels that will also construct a turing
machine from wood.

Bill, I'd use C++.

--
The address in the reply to header is correct, but I'll
read it quicker if you drop the word "usenet".
 
Reply With Quote
 
gswork
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
(E-Mail Removed) (English Teacher) wrote in message news:<(E-Mail Removed). com>...
> What would be the most useful language to learn among:
>
> Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?


That would depend on whether it's for woodworking or 35mm camera equipment.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Martijn
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
English Teacher wrote:
> What would be the most useful language to learn among:
>
> Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?


I would go with Java, 'cause coffee is useful during any of the activities
discussed in the newsgroups this has been sent to.

--
Martijn
http://www.sereneconcepts.nl


 
Reply With Quote
 
Christoph Breitkopf
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
"Martijn" <(E-Mail Removed)> writes:
> English Teacher wrote:
> > What would be the most useful language to learn among:
> >
> > Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?

>
> I would go with Java, 'cause coffee is useful during any of the activities
> discussed in the newsgroups this has been sent to.


Well, I prefer T. Also, with too much caffeine, I have trouble handholding
lenses at slower speeds.

Regards,
Chris

--
Bokeh test images: http://www.bokeh.de/en/bokeh_images.html
 
Reply With Quote
 
Mark
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
(E-Mail Removed) (English Teacher) writes:
>What would be the most useful language to learn among:
>Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?


One that incorporates as much of an algebraic theory of control flow
structures within by embedding the greatest degree of equivalences
between them. This is especially important for the deployment of
practical algebraic tools and methods for mathematical verification,
transformation and optimization.

Both C and C++ have the required degree of fluidity in their control
flow structures. In contrast, things tends to be frozen in place in
Java and BASIC dialects, thus increasingly requiring algebraic steps in
control flow structure manipulations and computations to go outside the
language during intermediate steps.

Also important is to minimize the degree of built-in'edness, which
really straightjackets everything at the outset. This is directly tied
to the issue of fluidity: more built-in'edness tends to be symptomatic
of lesser fluidity.

This, too, favors a C/C++ approach, with suitable libraries (if need
be) to handle the native features that might be incorporated in the
other languages. C++ has the best advantage in terms of its ability
(when used right) for nearly seamless extension by quasi-native add-ons.

Ironically, strictures placed on some of the control flow structures --
which greatly impedes the enterprise of algebraic mathematical
verification, transformation and optimization, are often placed in the
name of "reliability" (particularly, that put on the "for" loop in
some of these languages, Pascal was the worst).

If the BASIC dialects were to incorporate more of the C-like syntax, they'd
have the advantage over C. C++, however, would probably still have the
advantage over both, since you can bring in the features native to BASIC
via appropriate class definitions.

The main disadvantage of C++ is its overly-bureaucratic design. It's
almost as if the language was conceived by a committee of suit-wearing
company men at some large corporation or something, heavily imbued
in the "latest-buzz" and "everything is a programme" mindset of companyese.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Alan Browne
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003


English Teacher wrote:

> What would be the most useful language to learn among:
>
> Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?



TrollMasher++ 3.0

 
Reply With Quote
 
stan@temple.edu
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-21-2003
In rec.photo.digital English Teacher <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> What would be the most useful language to learn among:


Before you plunge into learning a computer language, consider
learning english and Internet ettiquette.
 
Reply With Quote
 
David Binkowski
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      10-22-2003
So your vote is COBOL, right ?

--
The software said it ran under Windows 98/NT/2000, or better.
So I installed it on Linux...
"Mark" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bn3nce$kbh$(E-Mail Removed)...
> (E-Mail Removed) (English Teacher) writes:
> >What would be the most useful language to learn among:
> >Java, C, C#, C++, VB, VB.NET, DELPHI?

>
> One that incorporates as much of an algebraic theory of control flow
> structures within by embedding the greatest degree of equivalences
> between them. This is especially important for the deployment of
> practical algebraic tools and methods for mathematical verification,
> transformation and optimization.
>
> Both C and C++ have the required degree of fluidity in their control
> flow structures. In contrast, things tends to be frozen in place in
> Java and BASIC dialects, thus increasingly requiring algebraic steps in
> control flow structure manipulations and computations to go outside the
> language during intermediate steps.
>
> Also important is to minimize the degree of built-in'edness, which
> really straightjackets everything at the outset. This is directly tied
> to the issue of fluidity: more built-in'edness tends to be symptomatic
> of lesser fluidity.
>
> This, too, favors a C/C++ approach, with suitable libraries (if need
> be) to handle the native features that might be incorporated in the
> other languages. C++ has the best advantage in terms of its ability
> (when used right) for nearly seamless extension by quasi-native add-ons.
>
> Ironically, strictures placed on some of the control flow structures --
> which greatly impedes the enterprise of algebraic mathematical
> verification, transformation and optimization, are often placed in the
> name of "reliability" (particularly, that put on the "for" loop in
> some of these languages, Pascal was the worst).
>
> If the BASIC dialects were to incorporate more of the C-like syntax,

they'd
> have the advantage over C. C++, however, would probably still have the
> advantage over both, since you can bring in the features native to BASIC
> via appropriate class definitions.
>
> The main disadvantage of C++ is its overly-bureaucratic design. It's
> almost as if the language was conceived by a committee of suit-wearing
> company men at some large corporation or something, heavily imbued
> in the "latest-buzz" and "everything is a programme" mindset of

companyese.


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
useful setting in device manager (may be useful to know!) jameshanley39@yahoo.co.uk Computer Information 2 07-07-2008 04:28 PM
The most useful $12 camera part I have Cynicor Digital Photography 5 12-01-2007 05:59 PM
What sort of documentation is most useful for a java application? frustratedprogrammer@gmail.com Java 6 04-01-2007 07:39 PM
Firefox extensions - which are you using / find most useful? GraB NZ Computing 4 09-07-2004 09:40 PM
Python is the best and most popular general purpose scripting language; the universal scripting language Ron Stephens Python 23 04-12-2004 05:32 PM



Advertisments