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AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH, CANADIAN, or AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH

 
 
Russell
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      09-24-2003
Not quite, Sir Thomas Crapper was responsible for the first
successful flushable commode. There were many others
contemporary with him and earlier.

mike II wrote:
> Jimmy wrote:
>
>> I am an American, can you spell CRAP? This is exactly what you are
>> spreading.

>
>
>
> Named after Thomas Crap..English inventer of the first flushable toilet
> words...
>
>
>
>
> mike
>


 
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Russell
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      09-24-2003
The definitive standard for the English language is the OED,
which includes entries for all standard dialects. There is no
standard American (actually North American) English dialect. The
dialects within the USA or Canada are as diverse as those within
England herself. Languages change over time. New terms are
coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
detrimental affect on the development of society itself.

Proud USA Babe wrote:

> AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH ENGLISH:
>
> I am not unaware of the history of the English language, but I do
> strongly feel that the modern American dialect of the English language
> is the most efficient. Of course, it took root in England...as did the
> Spanish language in the Castilian section of Spain. But not unlike
> Spanish, the modern progression English language is not in England,
> but in the United States of America.
>
> American English sets the world standard for the modern English
> language. The spelling system that evolved in America is more
> attractive to new learners of the language, as well as more efficient
> and consistent.
>
> To the Brits, Australians, Canadians, New Zealanders, Irishmen, and
> persons of other second-rate countries that use the old spelling and
> pronunciation system AKA "British English"....join the 21st century
> and start to spell and pronounce English like we do here in the GREAT
> OLD USA! AMERICAN POWER!


 
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jb
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      09-24-2003
In article <bksiih$qnt$(E-Mail Removed)>, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) says...
> The definitive standard for the English language is the OED,
> which includes entries for all standard dialects. There is no
> standard American (actually North American) English dialect. The
> dialects within the USA or Canada are as diverse as those within
> England herself. Languages change over time. New terms are
> coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
> languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
> detrimental affect on the development of society itself.
>
> Proud USA Babe wrote:
>
> > AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH ENGLISH:
> >
> > I am not unaware of the history of the English language, but I do
> > strongly feel that the modern American dialect of the English language
> > is the most efficient. Of course, it took root in England...as did the
> > Spanish language in the Castilian section of Spain. But not unlike
> > Spanish, the modern progression English language is not in England,
> > but in the United States of America.
> >
> > American English sets the world standard for the modern English
> > language. The spelling system that evolved in America is more
> > attractive to new learners of the language, as well as more efficient
> > and consistent.
> >
> > To the Brits, Australians, Canadians, New Zealanders, Irishmen, and
> > persons of other second-rate countries that use the old spelling and
> > pronunciation system AKA "British English"....join the 21st century
> > and start to spell and pronounce English like we do here in the GREAT
> > OLD USA! AMERICAN POWER!

>
>

Now you've confused Babe. Hours searching for what OED stands for.
American English (an oxymoron) is as idiosyncratic. Example, they spell
schedule but pronounce it skedule.
Easy to join Babe's 21st century. Huh!
 
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William Graham
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      09-24-2003

Russell <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bksiih$qnt$(E-Mail Removed)...
New terms are
> coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
> languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
> detrimental affect on the development of society itself.


Hummmm.....This must be what happened to the French..........


 
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Frank ess
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      09-24-2003
Proud USA Babe wrote:

> AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH ENGLISH:
>
> I am not unaware of the history of the English language, but I do
> strongly feel that the modern American dialect of the English language
> is the most efficient. Of course, it took root in England...as did the
> Spanish language in the Castilian section of Spain. But not unlike
> Spanish, the modern progression English language is not in England,
> but in the United States of America.


"had its roots"

She means "had its roots".

"took root" means it was successfully transplanted there. That may be true,
too, but I think it was not what

Pompous.

Pretentious.

Proud USA 'Babe' intended to convey.
--
Frank ess

Forecasting is difficult. Particularly about the Future.
óDeepak Gupta



 
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nogo
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      09-24-2003
In article <Qrmcb.566390$Ho3.103451@sccrnsc03>, (E-Mail Removed) says...
>
> Russell <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:bksiih$qnt$(E-Mail Removed)...
> New terms are
> > coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
> > languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
> > detrimental affect on the development of society itself.

>
> Hummmm.....This must be what happened to the French..........
>
>

Did something happen to the French?
Or are you talking about the language. You see that's what makes for
good use of grammar. D minus I think.
 
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William Graham
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      09-24-2003

nogo <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <Qrmcb.566390$Ho3.103451@sccrnsc03>, (E-Mail Removed) says...
> >
> > Russell <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:bksiih$qnt$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > New terms are
> > > coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
> > > languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
> > > detrimental affect on the development of society itself.

> >
> > Hummmm.....This must be what happened to the French..........
> >
> >

> Did something happen to the French?
> Or are you talking about the language. You see that's what makes for
> good use of grammar. D minus I think.


No, I meant the French society......Move me back to A+......


 
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Russell
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      09-24-2003


jb wrote:
> In article <bksiih$qnt$(E-Mail Removed)>, (E-Mail Removed) says...
>
>>The definitive standard for the English language is the OED,
>>which includes entries for all standard dialects. There is no
>>standard American (actually North American) English dialect. The
>>dialects within the USA or Canada are as diverse as those within
>>England herself. Languages change over time. New terms are
>>coined, old terms dropped, and more terms adopted from other
>>languages. Any attempt to freeze a language would have a
>>detrimental affect on the development of society itself.
>>
>>Proud USA Babe wrote:
>>
>>
>>>AMERICAN ENGLISH vs BRITISH ENGLISH:
>>>
>>>-----------CUT-----------

>>

> Now you've confused Babe. Hours searching for what OED stands for.
> American English (an oxymoron) is as idiosyncratic. Example, they spell
> schedule but pronounce it skedule.
> Easy to join Babe's 21st century. Huh!


Idiosyncratic...Oh, you mean like the English who spell *clerk*
and pronouce it *clark*, or spell *Leicester* and pronounce it
*Lester*.

 
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Peacenik
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      09-25-2003
"Mark Wallace" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:bknr94$3r77c$(E-Mail Removed)-berlin.de...
> friend wrote:
> > On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 14:51:26 +0200, "Mark Wallace" <(E-Mail Removed)>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> friend wrote:
> >>> On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 09:32:26 +0100, "Phill"
> >>> <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>>
> >>>> "William Graham" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>> news:bbxbb.122686$(E-Mail Removed) et...
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Jimmy <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> >>>>> news:m_ubb.18273$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >>>>>> I am an American, can you spell CRAP? This is exactly what you
> >>>>>> are spreading.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> Wouldn't that be, "crape"?
> >>>>>
> >>>>
> >>>> I thought crapes were a sort of pancake eaten by our European
> >>>> friends.
> >>>>
> >>>> Most people I meet who speak English as a second lanuage speak it
> >>>> with an Amercain accent.
> >>>
> >>> you're wrong
> >>
> >> How can he possibly be wrong?
> >> Do you know all the people he meets? Have you vetted their accents?
> >>
> >> Think hard, then keep quiet.

> >
> > all the people I meet, and I am a second-language-speaker, speak with
> > British accent.

>
> Then you should have said that your experience is different.


Indeed.

It really depends on who teaches the students, and what accent is in
preferred in the English-lessons market. In Taiwan, most people are taught
to speak English with an Anerican accent, since that is what is generally in
demand. In Singapore and Malaysia, people are usually taught to speak
English with a British accent. I have come across quite a few Thais and
Laotians who speak English with an Australian accent, which is probably
related to the fact that more Australians travel through those countries
than any other English-speaking group.

In Cambodia I encountered a Frenchman who spoke English with a heavy French
accent, who was teaching English to local students. I can just imagine what
their English sounds like!!

--
Chris



 
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Peacenik
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      09-25-2003
<piggybacking>

> "a.spencer3" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:wHBbb.654$(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > Witheld <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > > In article <Olzbb.551$(E-Mail Removed)>,
> > > "Phill" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > >
> > > >
> > > > I am English and I live in London, but most people I meet who have

> > English
> > > > as a second lanuage and learnt it outside of Europe speak Ameriacian
> > > > English.
> > > > English seems to be the most common second lanuage, so if my

> > observations
> > > > are accurate and given that there are more Americains than there are

> > British
> > > > and more people outside of Europe than within, ultimately Americain

> > English
> > > > will become dominant.
> > >
> > > Well I hope it's not the American English you hear spoken in some

> southern
> > > American places then some of us Americans would be up "crapes

> creep".
> > > --
> > > When you live next to the graveyard, you can't cry at every funeral.

> >
> > I still love that crazy Southern cop in the Bond films, even though I

can
> > barely understand a word he says!
> > Is that a normal Southern accent, or grossly exaggerated?


There are many different accents in the American South - the most
interesting being that spoken in the Cajun country of Louisiana.

The James Bond cop's accent comes closest to what I heard when I visited
Alabama.

--
Chris


 
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