Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Digital Photography > Re: Paper and the Epson Stylus Photo 2200

Reply
Thread Tools

Re: Paper and the Epson Stylus Photo 2200

 
 
Bill Hilton
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-17-2003
>From: http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (Idolize55)
>
>I recently purchased an Epson Stylus Photo 2200 printer.
>I've been using Epson Premium Glossy, but someone
>mentioned that it wasn't archival. None of the Epson
>papers I looked at mentioned anything about being archival.


Epson is nervous about making claims something is "archival" since the word has
different meanings to different people.

Here's a link to *estimated* print life longevity with the 2200 papers, the
numbers are only a scientific guess since they rely on accelerated testing at
high light levels under specific conditions for temperature and humidity, but
are as good a guess as you'll likely find.

Epson PGPP, the paper you're using, is rated at 56 years, which is excellent.

http://www.inkjetart.com/news/longevity/index.html

>I'm looking to print some of my fashion work for my portfolio, so can
>anyone recommend a glossy paper that gives great, clean, crisp
>results for the 2200? (Archival paper would be a definite plus.)


I have the 2200 ... to my tastes, the best Epson paper for printing portraits
is the Premium Luster Photo Paper, rated at 71 years. My favorite all-around
higher gloss paper for the 2200 is Premium Semi-Gloss, rated at 54 years.

I like glossy papers, but the issue with the 2200 and PGPP (Premium Glossy
Photo Paper) is the tendency for black ink to pool up and look "funny" if you
turn the paper at a slight angle, sometimes called "gloss differential". You
can test this yourself by printing something with a patch of black in it,
viewing the print with the main light over your shoulder and turning the paper
slowly up to 30 degrees. The black will turn a weird looking bronze or grey
color. If you can live with that then the PGPP is the paper for you.

Anyway, don't worry about the archival properties of any of these papers, just
try a few prints on each of them and see what looks best to your tastes.

Bill


 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
Idolize55
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-17-2003
>I like glossy papers, but the issue with the 2200 and PGPP (Premium Glossy
>Photo Paper) is the tendency for black ink to pool up and look "funny" if you
>turn the paper at a slight angle, sometimes called "gloss differential". You
>can test this yourself by printing something with a patch of black in it,
>viewing the print with the main light over your shoulder and turning the
>paper
>slowly up to 30 degrees. The black will turn a weird looking bronze or grey
>color. If you can live with that then the PGPP is the paper for you.
>
>Anyway, don't worry about the archival properties of any of these papers,
>just
>try a few prints on each of them and see what looks best to your tastes.
>
>Bill
>
>



Thanks, Bill. It's strange, but black doesn't "pool up" on me when I print.
However, dark reds and burgandies do.It doesn't bother me too much since most
of the prints I do get put behind clear plastic, vinyl or glass. I've used some
of the semi-gloss paper before and wasn't too thrilled with the appearance it
had for the type of work I was printing. (I guess I've just been spoiled by
"traditional" glossy paper photo paper, which has an extremely glossy surface.)
I do, however, like semi-gloss and matte papers for things like commercial
advertisements. (You know, things like restaurant "table tents", etc.)

Thanks for the suggestions. **Runs out to try the Lustere paper to see what
that's all about.**
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
JIM
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-18-2003
"Idolize55" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
.....<cut>....It doesn't bother me too much since most
> of the prints I do get put behind clear plastic, vinyl or glass.

.....<cut>....

I have to agree with Mr. Hilton on his paper selections; however, Epson does
furnish at least one type that has "archival" in its title: Archival Matte
Paper.

Do a little experiment, since you state "....get put behind ....or glass."
Print the same pic on your favorite glossy paper and on the matte type paper
(I prefer the Archival one). Since this is a test, no need to wait for
them to dry the recommended 24 hours, just place both behind a sheet of
glass and see if you can tell which is glossier? I doubt there is that much
perceived difference between the two except you wont have to deal with any
funny blocking effects with the matte papers.............

Shoot'em up, print on anything, Agfa, Fuji, Kodak and all the rest will love
you for it!!

Jim


 
Reply With Quote
 
Eolake Stobblehouse
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-18-2003

> I have to agree with Mr. Hilton on his paper selections; however, Epson does
> furnish at least one type that has "archival" in its title: Archival Matte
> Paper.



this is true. This paper should in theory last over a century, and it
is even cheaper than the glossy. So for framing, this should be the
perfect paper for a pigment-based printer.

--
- Eolake
--
(E-Mail Removed)
http://MacCreator.com
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Epson 2200 vs Stylus Pro 4000 Sbtypesetter Digital Photography 6 09-07-2004 03:01 AM
Help !!! Epson Stylus 2200 Printing Problems Brian Corll Digital Photography 4 05-07-2004 10:57 PM
Solution for Epson 2200 Roll Paper in Mac OS X jlbmacuser Digital Photography 0 11-04-2003 05:53 AM
Re: Epson stylus photo 925 - paper feeds trouble Geir Klemetsen Digital Photography 1 08-08-2003 05:16 PM
Re: Epson printer 2200 - Epson semi-gloss paper nobody nowhere Digital Photography 1 07-13-2003 02:45 PM



Advertisments