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R Digicams Considered Electronic Devices On Airplanes ?

 
 
Crash
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      09-09-2003
On a recent American Airlines flight from Vegas to Los Angeles, I whipped
out my digital camera to take pictures. I snapped away during taxiing,
take-off, the whole flight, landing, taxiing again. Before takeoff from
Vegas I heard the standard announcement about turning off electronic
devices. Laptops and cell phones were mentioned specifically. I wondered
for a second if a digital camera could be an offending electronic device. No
one asked me to put it away at any time. I was taking pictures right out in
the open, not being secretive about it. Also, there was an off duty flight
attendant sitting a few seats away who never said anything. Anyone know
what the official policy is on digital cameras in airplanes? Perhaps there
isn't a policy yet? Perhaps it differs from one airline to another?

Thanks.


 
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PTRAVEL
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      09-09-2003

"Crash" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:fX87b.398991$uu5.73331@sccrnsc04...
> On a recent American Airlines flight from Vegas to Los Angeles, I whipped
> out my digital camera to take pictures. I snapped away during taxiing,
> take-off, the whole flight, landing, taxiing again. Before takeoff from
> Vegas I heard the standard announcement about turning off electronic
> devices. Laptops and cell phones were mentioned specifically. I wondered
> for a second if a digital camera could be an offending electronic device.


Of course it would. A digital camera is no more nor less than a specialized
computer. Computer use is precluded by FAA regulation below 10,000 feet.

>No
> one asked me to put it away at any time. I was taking pictures right out

in
> the open, not being secretive about it. Also, there was an off duty

flight
> attendant sitting a few seats away who never said anything.


Off-duty FAs are just that -- off-duty. You evidently weren't seen by the
on-duty FAs.

> Anyone know
> what the official policy is on digital cameras in airplanes? Perhaps

there
> isn't a policy yet? Perhaps it differs from one airline to another?




>
> Thanks.
>
>



 
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Dutch
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      09-09-2003
>On a recent American Airlines flight from Vegas to Los Angeles, I whipped
>out my digital camera to take pictures. I snapped away during taxiing,
>take-off, the whole flight, landing, taxiing again. Before takeoff from
>Vegas I heard the standard announcement about turning off electronic
>devices. Laptops and cell phones were mentioned specifically. I wondered
>for a second if a digital camera could be an offending electronic device. No
>one asked me to put it away at any time. I was taking pictures right out in
>the open, not being secretive about it. Also, there was an off duty flight
>attendant sitting a few seats away who never said anything. Anyone know
>what the official policy is on digital cameras in airplanes? Perhaps there
>isn't a policy yet? Perhaps it differs from one airline to another?
>
>Thanks.


Digital cameras are electronics (there's a pretty impressive little
computer in there).

The basic question you should be asking yourself is this. Do you want
to add, in even the slightest way, to the odds of not arriving safely
at your destination?

In other words if you aren't sure then you should probably shut it
off.


It's Just a dream...now go back to sleep!
 
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Jason O'Rourke
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      09-09-2003
Dutch <zespectre> wrote:
>>attendant sitting a few seats away who never said anything. Anyone know
>>what the official policy is on digital cameras in airplanes? Perhaps there
>>isn't a policy yet? Perhaps it differs from one airline to another?

>
>Digital cameras are electronics (there's a pretty impressive little
>computer in there).
>
>The basic question you should be asking yourself is this. Do you want
>to add, in even the slightest way, to the odds of not arriving safely
>at your destination?
>
>In other words if you aren't sure then you should probably shut it
>off.


Don't forget to turn off your digital wristwatch too!

Sheesh. There's a pretty big difference between a notebook and a digital
camera in terms of wattage.

(A truer answer would probably be to follow whatever the rules are for
walkmans. If memory serves, tuners were a problem, but I thought that
cd and tape players were fine).
--
Jason O'Rourke www.jor.com
 
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Gabriel Lau Kin Jock
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      09-09-2003
On my last flight to LA via Air Canada, I simply asked the flight
attendant whether I could take pictures with my digicam, and his answer
was "it's fine".

Eric Gisin wrote:
> "Jason O'Rourke" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:bjjct0$1fbp$(E-Mail Removed)...
> | >Digital cameras are electronics (there's a pretty impressive little
> | >computer in there).
> |
> | Don't forget to turn off your digital wristwatch too!
> |
> | Sheesh. There's a pretty big difference between a notebook and a digital
> | camera in terms of wattage.
>
> I'm sure most cameras contain a 32-bit RISC processor as powerful as a 5 year
> old PC.
>
>



 
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Paul Cordes
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      09-09-2003

"Crash" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:fX87b.398991$uu5.73331@sccrnsc04...
> On a recent American Airlines flight from Vegas to Los Angeles, I whipped
> out my digital camera to take pictures. I snapped away during taxiing,
> take-off, the whole flight, landing, taxiing again. Before takeoff from
> Vegas I heard the standard announcement about turning off electronic
> devices. Laptops and cell phones were mentioned specifically. I wondered
> for a second if a digital camera could be an offending electronic device.

No
> one asked me to put it away at any time. I was taking pictures right out

in
> the open, not being secretive about it. Also, there was an off duty

flight
> attendant sitting a few seats away who never said anything. Anyone know
> what the official policy is on digital cameras in airplanes? Perhaps

there
> isn't a policy yet? Perhaps it differs from one airline to another?
>
> Thanks.


My understanding is that this is the airlines equivilent of an urban legend.
I.e. the airlines believe that consumer electronics will interfere with the
flight instruments. But there is no evidence.
The airlines make these rules. Every airline is different. There is no
evidence that anything you carry and use will cause a problem.
The FAA has no rule.
The FCC has no rule.
Never the less, turn it off, as the flight crew has no sense of humor about
this and will have you arrested if you make yourself a problem.


 
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Tom Thackrey
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      09-09-2003

On 9-Sep-2003, "Paul Cordes" <late*(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> My understanding is that this is the airlines equivilent of an urban
> legend.
> I.e. the airlines believe that consumer electronics will interfere with
> the
> flight instruments. But there is no evidence.
> The airlines make these rules. Every airline is different. There is no
> evidence that anything you carry and use will cause a problem.
> The FAA has no rule.
> The FCC has no rule.
> Never the less, turn it off, as the flight crew has no sense of humor
> about
> this and will have you arrested if you make yourself a problem.


You are wrong it is an FAA rule.

http://www.orientaviation.com/pages/...EDSSafety.html

--
Tom Thackrey
www.creative-light.com
 
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Paul Cordes
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      09-09-2003

"Tom Thackrey" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:sum7b.633$(E-Mail Removed). ..
>
> On 9-Sep-2003, "Paul Cordes" <late*(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > My understanding is that this is the airlines equivilent of an urban
> > legend.
> > I.e. the airlines believe that consumer electronics will interfere with
> > the
> > flight instruments. But there is no evidence.
> > The airlines make these rules. Every airline is different. There is no
> > evidence that anything you carry and use will cause a problem.
> > The FAA has no rule.
> > The FCC has no rule.
> > Never the less, turn it off, as the flight crew has no sense of humor
> > about
> > this and will have you arrested if you make yourself a problem.

>
> You are wrong it is an FAA rule.
>
>

http://www.orientaviation.com/pages/...EDSSafety.html
>
> --
> Tom Thackrey
> www.creative-light.com


Did you even read the article? It only says that this one FAA employee
wants regulation, not that there is any regulation.
I stand by my original contention. But am willing to be proven wrong if you
can cite the FAA reg itself.


 
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Tom Thackrey
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      09-09-2003

On 9-Sep-2003, "Paul Cordes" <late*(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> "Tom Thackrey" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:sum7b.633$(E-Mail Removed). ..
> >
> > On 9-Sep-2003, "Paul Cordes" <late*(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> >
> > > My understanding is that this is the airlines equivilent of an urban
> > > legend.
> > > I.e. the airlines believe that consumer electronics will interfere
> > > with
> > > the
> > > flight instruments. But there is no evidence.
> > > The airlines make these rules. Every airline is different. There is
> > > no
> > > evidence that anything you carry and use will cause a problem.
> > > The FAA has no rule.
> > > The FCC has no rule.
> > > Never the less, turn it off, as the flight crew has no sense of humor
> > > about
> > > this and will have you arrested if you make yourself a problem.

> >
> > You are wrong it is an FAA rule.
> >
> >

> http://www.orientaviation.com/pages/...EDSSafety.html
> >
> > --
> > Tom Thackrey
> > www.creative-light.com

>
> Did you even read the article? It only says that this one FAA employee
> wants regulation, not that there is any regulation.
> I stand by my original contention. But am willing to be proven wrong if
> you
> can cite the FAA reg itself.


You seem to be partly right. The FAA reg
14 CFR - CHAPTER I - PART 121 121.306 Portable electronic devices.
says that airlines must determine which devices do not interfer with
instruments/radios before they can allow their use inflight.


--
Tom Thackrey
www.creative-light.com
 
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Paul Cordes
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      09-09-2003

"Tom Thackrey" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:Zbo7b.682$(E-Mail Removed).. .
>
> You seem to be partly right. The FAA reg
> 14 CFR - CHAPTER I - PART 121 121.306 Portable electronic devices.
> says that airlines must determine which devices do not interfer with
> instruments/radios before they can allow their use inflight.
>
>
> --
> Tom Thackrey
> www.creative-light.com


Thanks for that. That's more of a rule than I thought existed. So the
airlines do have some authority to decide the issue and thus, you should not
attempt to do something they don't want you to do.


 
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