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Re: Shame on B&H

 
 
Bernhard Mayer
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      08-17-2003
RDKirk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message news:<0oz%a.5711$(E-Mail Removed)>...

> Are you saying that we *can* photograph in malls as much as we want, and
> can't be compelled to leave?


private property and up to the owner decide

as a rule of thumb, if you run around with your family and document
your "day at the mall" or as a tourist take a picture of the world's
largest mall or whatever... nobody's going to bother you

If you start setting up a tripod, have a bunch of assistants around,
pull out that Hasselblad... you'll be talking to security in no time

This is actually quite simple and you can ask any pro photographer out
there. If you want to take pictures professionally (or if your
personal photo session may look like a professional one: e.g. use of
tripod), you pick up the phone and call the place's PR department. In
Europe, be prepared to either convince the guy you are not selling the
photos or pay for the license to do so - this specifically includes so
called "public areas" such as the Eiffel tower, a station (when you
take pictures of the ICE train, Deutsche Bahn wants money for that)
and several sights all around Europe.
 
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Tom Scales
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      08-18-2003
A mall is very much private property. They are very much in their rights to
ask you to leave. You are on the property only as long as they want you to
be.

Tom
"Charlie Self" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Bruce MacNeil states:
>
> >In teh US a mall or fairground is not private property.

>
> You may want to check on that. I don't know about fairgrounds, which are
> usually temporary set-ups, but the mall owners across the U.S. might well

want
> to argue the private property aspect of their ownership.
>
> Public access does not automatically create public property.
>
> Charlie Self
>
> "A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the polls."
> Dan Quayle
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



 
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Bruce MacNeil
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      08-18-2003

In teh US a mall or fairground is not private property.


"Bernhard Mayer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> RDKirk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

news:<0oz%a.5711$(E-Mail Removed)>...
>
> > Are you saying that we *can* photograph in malls as much as we want, and
> > can't be compelled to leave?

>
> private property and up to the owner decide
>
> as a rule of thumb, if you run around with your family and document
> your "day at the mall" or as a tourist take a picture of the world's
> largest mall or whatever... nobody's going to bother you
>
> If you start setting up a tripod, have a bunch of assistants around,
> pull out that Hasselblad... you'll be talking to security in no time
>
> This is actually quite simple and you can ask any pro photographer out
> there. If you want to take pictures professionally (or if your
> personal photo session may look like a professional one: e.g. use of
> tripod), you pick up the phone and call the place's PR department. In
> Europe, be prepared to either convince the guy you are not selling the
> photos or pay for the license to do so - this specifically includes so
> called "public areas" such as the Eiffel tower, a station (when you
> take pictures of the ICE train, Deutsche Bahn wants money for that)
> and several sights all around Europe.



 
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Sally Beacham
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-19-2003

"Bruce MacNeil" <bruce@no_spambrucemacneil.com> wrote in message
news:tod0b.284$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> In teh US a mall or fairground is not private property.
>


Oh yes it is. Whether or not the management chooses to enforce it as
such - it still most certainly is private property.

--
Sally Beacham
www.dizteq.com
www.psppower.com /FilterMunky's best friend
www.lvsonline.com/ Paint Shop Pro, Filter Frenzy, Xara X
sallyATdizteq.com




>
> "Bernhard Mayer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> > RDKirk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

> news:<0oz%a.5711$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> >
> > > Are you saying that we *can* photograph in malls as much as we want,

and
> > > can't be compelled to leave?

> >
> > private property and up to the owner decide
> >
> > as a rule of thumb, if you run around with your family and document
> > your "day at the mall" or as a tourist take a picture of the world's
> > largest mall or whatever... nobody's going to bother you
> >
> > If you start setting up a tripod, have a bunch of assistants around,
> > pull out that Hasselblad... you'll be talking to security in no time
> >
> > This is actually quite simple and you can ask any pro photographer out
> > there. If you want to take pictures professionally (or if your
> > personal photo session may look like a professional one: e.g. use of
> > tripod), you pick up the phone and call the place's PR department. In
> > Europe, be prepared to either convince the guy you are not selling the
> > photos or pay for the license to do so - this specifically includes so
> > called "public areas" such as the Eiffel tower, a station (when you
> > take pictures of the ICE train, Deutsche Bahn wants money for that)
> > and several sights all around Europe.

>
>



 
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PTRAVEL
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Posts: n/a
 
      08-19-2003

"Bruce MacNeil" <bruce@no_spambrucemacneil.com> wrote in message
news:tod0b.284$(E-Mail Removed)...
>
> In teh US a mall or fairground is not private property.


Where do people get this nonsense?

Malls are private property. Fairgrounds may or may not be, depending on
whether they're state property or not.

Owners of private property can prohibit any conduct they want, provided
they're not violating any laws, e.g. non-discrimination, etc.

>
>
> "Bernhard Mayer" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed) om...
> > RDKirk <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message

> news:<0oz%a.5711$(E-Mail Removed)>...
> >
> > > Are you saying that we *can* photograph in malls as much as we want,

and
> > > can't be compelled to leave?

> >
> > private property and up to the owner decide
> >
> > as a rule of thumb, if you run around with your family and document
> > your "day at the mall" or as a tourist take a picture of the world's
> > largest mall or whatever... nobody's going to bother you
> >
> > If you start setting up a tripod, have a bunch of assistants around,
> > pull out that Hasselblad... you'll be talking to security in no time
> >
> > This is actually quite simple and you can ask any pro photographer out
> > there. If you want to take pictures professionally (or if your
> > personal photo session may look like a professional one: e.g. use of
> > tripod), you pick up the phone and call the place's PR department. In
> > Europe, be prepared to either convince the guy you are not selling the
> > photos or pay for the license to do so - this specifically includes so
> > called "public areas" such as the Eiffel tower, a station (when you
> > take pictures of the ICE train, Deutsche Bahn wants money for that)
> > and several sights all around Europe.

>
>



 
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PTRAVEL
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      08-19-2003

"Bill Williams" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:dme0b.749$(E-Mail Removed) k.net...
> Charlie Self wrote:
>
> > Bruce MacNeil states:
> >
> >
> >>In teh US a mall or fairground is not private property.

> >
> >
> > You may want to check on that. I don't know about fairgrounds, which are
> > usually temporary set-ups, but the mall owners across the U.S. might

well want
> > to argue the private property aspect of their ownership.
> >
> > Public access does not automatically create public property.
> >
> > Charlie Self
> >
> > "A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the

polls."
> > Dan Quayle
> >
> >

> I believe Charlie is right. For example, try setting up a petition table
> in, say, the Mall of America (Bloomington, Minnesota) without permission
> of the mall owners.
>
> This was in doubt in the early days of enclosed malls and I was
> threatened with arrest in the early 70s at a mall in California for
> setting up a petition table in the mall without permission. Fortunately
> for me, the guards left without taking any action and we left after two
> or three hours. Nowadays, I probably wouldn't even get the legs of the
> table down.


California is the one exception to this, when it comes to engaging in what
otherwise would be considered protected First Amendment speech. In a
decision called Pruneyard, the California Supreme Court held that (1) the
protections of the 1st Amendment to the CA Constitution were more extensive
than those provided by the 1st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, and (2)
malls were deemed quasi-public forums and were subject to the right to
engage in core-value speech.

You can solicit signatures for petitions in malls in California.

However, none of this has anything to do with _taking_ photographs in malls,
which has nothing to do with 1st Amendment speech.


>



 
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