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Adobe Photo Elements vs. Photo Shop

 
 
Bruce
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      07-26-2003
I already have Photo Shop and got Photo Elements with a camera I just
bought. Is Elements a subset of Photo Shop? Is there any reason I'd
want to be running both of these programs?

Thanks,
Bruce
 
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Bill Hilton
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      07-26-2003
>From: http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (Bruce)

>Is Elements a subset of Photo Shop?


Yes.

>Is there any reason I'd
>want to be running both of these programs?


Elements dumbs down the commands a bit and has a lot of auto features. If you
already know how to do things well in Photoshop there is nothing new in
Elements, but if you're having problems with things in PS you might look at
Elements to see if there's a simpler way (but inevitably less flexbible way) to
do an editing task.
 
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Dick Weld
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      07-26-2003
Elements also has the irritating habit of seizing control so that all your old
PhotoShop files will open in Elements.

Jim Townsend wrote:

> Bruce wrote:
>
> > I already have Photo Shop and got Photo Elements with a camera I just
> > bought. Is Elements a subset of Photo Shop? Is there any reason I'd
> > want to be running both of these programs?

>
> Elements contains the key Photoshop features for editing photographs. It's
> probably what most people actually need.
>
> Using Photoshop for *simple* photo editing (contrast, color, unsharp etc) is
> kind of like picking up the family groceries with a 5 tonne truck
>
> If you already have Photoshop, there's no need to install elements.


 
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Tony Cooper
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      07-26-2003
On 26 Jul 2003 08:58:53 -0700, (E-Mail Removed) (Bruce) wrote:

>I already have Photo Shop and got Photo Elements with a camera I just
>bought. Is Elements a subset of Photo Shop? Is there any reason I'd
>want to be running both of these programs?
>

As others have said, Elements is a scaled-down version of PS.

What I wonder is the legality/morality of giving away Elements
obtained in this manner. There was a post in here recently from a
person that wanted a simple program to do the basics of photo
manipulation. I wonder if you would allowed to copy that Elements
disk and send him the copy if you chose to.

It is wrong to do that with PhotoShop, but since Elements is a free
bundleware I wonder if the same restrictions apply. Morally, it
wouldn't bother me a whit. Others may view it differently. I would
be uncomfortable selling the program, but not in charging a shipping
and handling fee for sending the disk.

I used to have a copy of the old Adobe Photo Deluxe program that came
bundled with something I purchased. I lost the original disk. Since
I own a legal copy of PhotoShop 7, I never used the program. When my
daughter started to use a digital camera I asked someone if I could
have a copy of their Adobe Photo Deluxe for her since it's better than
the program she has. The person I asked went ballistic and claimed I
was perpetrating intellectual theft so I backed off. I didn't see a
problem since the program was a freebie that didn't require
registration. I guess I'm a morally corrupt person, but I can live
with it.






--
Tony Cooper aka: (E-Mail Removed)
Provider of Jots, Tittles, and Oy!s
 
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Sloopy
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      07-26-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> What I wonder is the legality/morality of giving away Elements
> obtained in this manner.


It's illegal unless you hand the camera over with it.

-Sloopy
 
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Sloopy
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      07-26-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> I didn't see a
> problem since the program was a freebie that didn't require
> registration.


The program was not free.

You obtain a license to use it when you purchase the camera.

-Sloopy
 
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Sloopy
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      07-26-2003
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> It is wrong to do that with PhotoShop, but since Elements is a free
> bundleware I wonder if the same restrictions apply. Morally, it
> wouldn't bother me a whit. Others may view it differently. I would
> be uncomfortable selling the program, but not in charging a shipping
> and handling fee for sending the disk.


Are you a sociopath who thinks he has to follow only the laws that he
approves of?

-Sloopy
 
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Paul H.
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      07-26-2003

"Tony Cooper" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> On 26 Jul 2003 08:58:53 -0700, (E-Mail Removed) (Bruce) wrote:
>
> What I wonder is the legality/morality of giving away Elements
> obtained in this manner. There was a post in here recently from a
> person that wanted a simple program to do the basics of photo
> manipulation. I wonder if you would allowed to copy that Elements
> disk and send him the copy if you chose to.


I see the situation in simple moral terms: you acquired a license to
Photoshop Elements and it's you prerogative to give that license away. If
you were keeping a copy for yourself, that would be a different matter, but
as it stands the circumstance is "one license sold by Adobe, one program
used by an individual." Period.

Legally, of course, the issue may be different since, as lawyers *proudly*
declare, the law has nothing to do with morality.


> It is wrong to do that with PhotoShop, but since Elements is a free
> bundleware I wonder if the same restrictions apply. Morally, it
> wouldn't bother me a whit. Others may view it differently. I would
> be uncomfortable selling the program, but not in charging a shipping
> and handling fee for sending the disk.


I don't know if it should be different with Photoshop, assuming you held the
license for the product. If you transferred all program materials and
documentation to another person without keeping a copy for yourself, how
would that be Adobe's business or cause harm to Adobe? Again, one license,
one user; Adobe's bottom line would be unaffected.

> I used to have a copy of the old Adobe Photo Deluxe program that came
> bundled with something I purchased. I lost the original disk. Since
> I own a legal copy of PhotoShop 7, I never used the program. When my
> daughter started to use a digital camera I asked someone if I could
> have a copy of their Adobe Photo Deluxe for her since it's better than
> the program she has. The person I asked went ballistic and claimed I
> was perpetrating intellectual theft so I backed off.


Since you are a legal license holder of Photodeluxe, you have a right to
maintain a backup copy and IMHO, it is immaterial as to whether your backup
copy should be on CD-R, CD-R/W, or on a master CD not normally in your
possession. Practically speaking, there would be no difference--bytes are
bytes and you have a license to use the program. Frankly, that's the
message software producers have been pushing for several years now, "We
don't sell software, we sell licenses." Well, you have a license giving you
a right to use the program and the genealogy of the bytes comprising that
program is utterly irrelevant to the terms of the license.

Mere quibbling over terms and true jurisprudence ought to be different
things entirely.

Besides, on a larger scale, the bundling of software is an issue that has
never been satisfactorily dealt with by the courts or our representatives.
I think the contract concerning bundled software ought to be *solely*
between the company offering the bundled package and the software
producer(s) supplying software to the bundle. It is both absurd and unfair
to attempt to hold the end-user responsible, legally or morally, for an
agreement to which he was never a recognized party. Software producers
should understand and accept the risks associated with bundling, as we
end-users accept the "this software is not guaranteed for any particular
purpose" disclaimer in all software licenses I've seen. If a software
producer is unwilling to accept the risk of bundling, then the company
doesn't have to participate in bundling schemes: no one holds a gun to a
CEO's head making him or her bundle their programs with third-party
hardware. And when is the last time you heard of a software producer
barricaded in a locked office screaming "Stop me before I bundle again!"
through the door?

Speaking only for myself, I will continue to behave morally but I refuse to
act as an unpaid enforcer tasked to ensure *any* software company's
profitability. To that onerous concept, I say "Byte me!"



 
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Mark M
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      07-26-2003

"Sloopy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > What I wonder is the legality/morality of giving away Elements
> > obtained in this manner.

>
> It's illegal unless you hand the camera over with it.


You own that license of the software, and can give it away provided you
don't install it on your onw computer.


 
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Mark M
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      07-26-2003

"Sloopy" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> In article <(E-Mail Removed)>,
> Tony Cooper <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> > It is wrong to do that with PhotoShop, but since Elements is a free
> > bundleware I wonder if the same restrictions apply. Morally, it
> > wouldn't bother me a whit. Others may view it differently. I would
> > be uncomfortable selling the program, but not in charging a shipping
> > and handling fee for sending the disk.

>
> Are you a sociopath who thinks he has to follow only the laws that he
> approves of?


Cite the law, or quit posting BS.


 
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