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Freetalk, Vonage, BT Broadband Talk - important difference

 
 
M.Dexter@blueyonder.co.uk
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      04-07-2006
On 7 Apr 2006 07:35:01 -0700, http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) wrote:

>Packet 8 USA (Freetalk partner) have a nice feature called Simultaneous
>Ring.
>If Freetalk could also offer this feature then the BT advantage (see
>first msg in thread) disappears.
>
>You effectively can consolidate all your various phone numbers into
>your VOIP number. So people would call your VOIP number and your
>mobile, office, home VOIP and home landline phones would all ring
>simultaneously. Cool.

Very .
 
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duncan.perrett@elekta.com
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      04-07-2006
Just 'replying' to myself ...

This 'simultaneous ringing' might be charged like call
forwarding/divert though so isn't necessarily as good as the BT ATA's
advantage. I wouldn't pay for incoming calls just to get the
convenience of all my home phones ringing together.

 
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duncan.perrett@elekta.com
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      04-07-2006
Hang on a minute - I'm confusing myself!
If Freetalk had a Simultaneous Ring feature (as Vonage does) and I get
UK landline calls all-inclusively then I could use call
'forwarding/divert/SimulRing' to my home landline (though not my
mobile) without it costing a penny. Couldn't I? Would it cost the
caller the same as well?

 
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duncan.perrett@elekta.com
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      04-07-2006
Doh! Obviously what the original post was wanting was to get the VOIP
phone ringing when the landline is called not just vice-versa. BT
adpater's advantage remains if you don't want everyone to have to
change your number in their phone books.

 
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Paul Cupis
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      04-07-2006
(E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> On 7 Apr 2006 03:13:01 -0700, (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> Oh dear - I'll just have to keep my mobile charged then!

>
> So really you do not have a need to keep an expensive land line then.
> On the other hand if you subscribed to Vonage you could still dial 999
> from a Vonage account .


Even with the power out?
 
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stephen
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      04-07-2006
"PhilT" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > Is having a BT or NTL line relevant to my post?

>
> yes in that there would be a case for not having a landline if you have
> NTL cable internet. Also the local vs national call charges debate is
> call carrier specific.


if you take the TV as well NTL dont charge line rental here (Manchester)
>
> otherwise no.
>
>
> Phil

--
Regards

(E-Mail Removed) - replace xyz with ntl


 
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Ivor Jones
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      04-08-2006


"Paul Cupis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:e16521$2ubt$(E-Mail Removed)
> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
> > On 7 Apr 2006 03:13:01 -0700, (E-Mail Removed)
> > wrote:
> > > Oh dear - I'll just have to keep my mobile charged
> > > then!

> >
> > So really you do not have a need to keep an expensive
> > land line then. On the other hand if you subscribed to
> > Vonage you could still dial 999 from a Vonage account .

>
> Even with the power out?


If you have a UPS, yes. You *do* power your ATA/modem/router from a UPS,
yes..?

You don't..? D'oh..!


Ivor


 
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M.Dexter@blueyonder.co.uk
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      04-08-2006
On Sat, 8 Apr 2006 01:43:19 +0100, "Ivor Jones"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>
>
>"Paul Cupis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
>news:e16521$2ubt$(E-Mail Removed)
>> (E-Mail Removed) wrote:
>> > On 7 Apr 2006 03:13:01 -0700, (E-Mail Removed)
>> > wrote:
>> > > Oh dear - I'll just have to keep my mobile charged
>> > > then!
>> >
>> > So really you do not have a need to keep an expensive
>> > land line then. On the other hand if you subscribed to
>> > Vonage you could still dial 999 from a Vonage account .

>>
>> Even with the power out?

>
>If you have a UPS, yes. You *do* power your ATA/modem/router from a UPS,
>yes..?
>
>You don't..? D'oh..!
>
>
>Ivor
>

People do worry about having the ability to make emergency calls,
in nearly sixty years of knowing how to use a phone I have still got
to make my first emergency call .
Not that it makes any difference around here anyway by the time the
relevant emergency service arrived you would either have had your
house burned to the ground, had your property stolen or have died from
some illness or accident .
 
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alex
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      05-18-2006

<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed) oups.com...
>I have just bought a Freetalk box. I have yet to activate it. From
> what I can gather, the Freetalk and Vonage setups are VERY similar.
> However BT has one advantage....
>
> It's ATA or Phone Adapter (in my case it would be a Voyager 10V) has an
> extra port to connect to the home's landline circuit.
> I believe this means that if someone called your new VOIP phone number,
> all your phones would ring and similarly if they called your current
> landline phone number - all your phones would ring. Therefore BT's
> advantage is that you needn't bother to inform all your friends and
> relatives about your new (VOIP) phone number since they can continue to
> call you on your current landline phone number.
>
> I am tempted to change from Freetalk to BT because of this.
> The only reason I may just keep Freetalk is because my wireless router
> (and Ethernet Cable Modem and NTL socket) is not positioned near a
> landline socket. I will be connecting the Freetalk box to a cordless
> (DECT) base station. So I would have to move everything (or run a long
> cable) to take advantage of BT's feature. I will also connect a
> regular phone to a landline socket but then my phones will
> unfortunately not ring 'as one'.
>
> Another point on VOIP ...
>
> The VOIP vendors are keen on advertising the fact that you can choose
> any local area code regardless of your physical location. This is
> meant to save your callers money. However, nowadays, there is no cost
> difference between a local call and a national call. So it seems
> pointless to me unless you are talking internationally.
>
> Any comments?
>


Yes that is good, but the other advantage is that in the event of
power/broadband failure, the box latches to the normal phone line so that
you can make emergency calls to 999.

Cheers

Alex


 
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