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128Kbps channel on VOIP?

 
 
Scott
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      10-20-2003
I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
Is there a standard applicable to this effort? I realize that the
G.711 rate is 64kbps, so it would be just like transporting two
regular G.711 channels. The problem would be splitting up the 128Kbps
and then resynchronizing the two on the other end. Thanks for any
help.
 
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Miguel Cruz
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      10-20-2003
Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
> Is there a standard applicable to this effort? I realize that the
> G.711 rate is 64kbps, so it would be just like transporting two
> regular G.711 channels. The problem would be splitting up the 128Kbps
> and then resynchronizing the two on the other end.


Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.

How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?

miguel
--
Hit The Road! Photos and tales from around the world: http://travel.u.nu
 
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root
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      10-20-2003
Miguel Cruz wrote:

> Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>> I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
>> Is there a standard applicable to this effort? I realize that the
>> G.711 rate is 64kbps, so it would be just like transporting two
>> regular G.711 channels. The problem would be splitting up the 128Kbps
>> and then resynchronizing the two on the other end.

>
> Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.
>


I thought so. Otherwise, one could have attached a FAX machine to the VoIP
device only for voice.

> How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?
>
> miguel


I thought that's what UDP is all about -- to transfer data over IP.

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MM
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      10-20-2003
Miguel Cruz wrote:
> Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>>I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
>>Is there a standard applicable to this effort? I realize that the
>>G.711 rate is 64kbps, so it would be just like transporting two
>>regular G.711 channels. The problem would be splitting up the 128Kbps
>>and then resynchronizing the two on the other end.

>
>
> Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.
>
> How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?
>
> miguel


Isn't that DIP for short..?


 
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Miguel Cruz
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      10-21-2003
MM <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> Miguel Cruz wrote:
>> Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>>> I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
>>> Is there a standard applicable to this effort?

>>
>> How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?

>
> Isn't that DIP for short..?


Oops, my mistake.

miguel
--
Hit The Road! Photos and tales from around the world: http://travel.u.nu
 
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Neil Smith
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      10-21-2003
On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 19:26:31 GMT, root
<(E-Mail Removed),administrator@localhost> wrote:

>>
>> Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.


>
>I thought that's what UDP is all about -- to transfer data over IP.
>


Isn't UDP potentially lossy as well ? Better stick to TCP for fax
data or you might lose that important signature ! BTW do www.tpc.com
still do email to fax services ? Might be worth a try for low volume
fax data.

>--
>root/administrator


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root
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      10-21-2003
Neil Smith wrote:

> On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 19:26:31 GMT, root
> <(E-Mail Removed),administrator@localhost> wrote:
>
>>>
>>> Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.

>
>>
>>I thought that's what UDP is all about -- to transfer data over IP.
>>

>
> Isn't UDP potentially lossy as well ? Better stick to TCP for fax
> data or you might lose that important signature ! BTW do www.tpc.com
> still do email to fax services ? Might be worth a try for low volume
> fax data.
>


Oops, my mistake, too.

--
root/administrator
 
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Scott
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      10-21-2003
http://www.velocityreviews.com/forums/(E-Mail Removed) (Miguel Cruz) wrote in message news:<TnVkb.37061$(E-Mail Removed)>.. .
> Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> > I am trying to transport 128Kbps data over VOIP. Is this possible?
> > Is there a standard applicable to this effort? I realize that the
> > G.711 rate is 64kbps, so it would be just like transporting two
> > regular G.711 channels. The problem would be splitting up the 128Kbps
> > and then resynchronizing the two on the other end.

>
> Isn't G.711 lossy? You get less data back out than you put in.
>
> How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?
>
> miguel


Thanks, but I have no choice...The protocol I must use is VOIP. The
data to transport is actually voice, but at 128Kbps. I was just
saying that somehow this stream must be split into two 64kbps and then
reassembled...I just wondered if VOIP has support for 128Kbps audio.

Scott
 
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Miguel Cruz
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      10-21-2003
Scott <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
> (E-Mail Removed) (Miguel Cruz) wrote:
>> How about trying the revolutionary new technology: DoIP (Data over IP)?

>
> Thanks, but I have no choice...The protocol I must use is VOIP. The data
> to transport is actually voice, but at 128Kbps. I was just saying that
> somehow this stream must be split into two 64kbps and then reassembled...I
> just wondered if VOIP has support for 128Kbps audio.


VoIP isn't a protocol, it's an open-ended set of technologies. I am sure you
can find a codec that wants 128K.

It is entirely unclear to me what the real restriction is that you are
facing. Why "must" you use VoIP? Without an answer to that question
(basically, a description of your connectivity environment) nobody can help
you much.

miguel
--
Hit The Road! Photos and tales from around the world: http://travel.u.nu
 
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MM
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      10-21-2003
Neil Smith wrote:
> On Mon, 20 Oct 2003 19:26:31 GMT, root
> <(E-Mail Removed),administrator@localhost> wrote:
>
>>I thought that's what UDP is all about -- to transfer data over IP.

>
> Isn't UDP potentially lossy as well ? Better stick to TCP for fax
> data or you might lose that important signature ! BTW do www.tpc.com
> still do email to fax services ? Might be worth a try for low volume
> fax data.


UDP is not lossy. G.711, like the MP3 audio format, takes an audio
stream and creates an approximation of that stream that requires less
bandwidth to store or transmit. Once this process is done, it can't be
undone. That is, there is no way of recreating the original audio stream.

UDP does not alter the data passed to it by an application. It differs
from TCP in that TCP sequences the data and requires acknowledgement of
receipt of that data. If a piece of data is lost, the TCP protocol will
detect this and request that the data be retransmitted, completely
transparent to the application. The cost of doing this is larger
packets due to overhead, plus more traffic due to the acknowledgements.
UDP just ships out the data without sequencing or acknowledgements.
It is up to the application to detect and retransmit data. If an
application that uses UDP loses data, it's the fault of the application,
not the tranport protocol.

MM

 
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