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Need "Proof" To Give to Co-worker About Browsing Habits & Spyware/Adware/Torjans/Viruses

 
 
Sens Fan Happy In Ohio
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
For several months now, both a laptop system and twice a desktop system,
I've been fighting with a co-worker's browsing habits. This person claims
to be visiting strictly legit websites, yet mysteriously ends up in places
they should not be and gets viruses, spyware, adware and/or trojans that do
nothing short of disabling the entire system. One laptop had to be
re-formatted from the mess created on a business trip, and twice now I've
managed to salvage the desktop system from Trojans and spyware ... but
nearly at the compromise of my own desktop system trying to visit warez
sites to grab software in an attempt to clean and lock down this system. I
don't like using warez products, but sometimes when a company only offers a
"trial" that will identify and not clean it's tough ... especially with the
demand to "get it fixed."

Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."

So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.

I've tried the usual places such as C-Net and such, but I don't really find
any articles that say "stay away from sites that feature X, Y and Z" ... and
that's what I need more than anything ... a real bare bones, plain English
page that states the obvious that most of us regulars and any IT personnel
know for a fact.

Thanks much!

--
Kyle )

Reply address is fake. Please send all praise, abuse, insults, bequests of
$1-million US dollars to sensfan_luvslisa (at) yahoo (dot) ca. Change the
obvious to the obvious. Oh, and if you must abuse or insult, don't expect a
reply. Money gets faster attention


 
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Trax
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
"Sens Fan Happy In Ohio" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

|>So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
|>exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
|>Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
|>says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
|>sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
|>I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
|>that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
|>that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
|>every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.

I run Opera, a HOSTS file, AVG antivirus, ZoneAlarm and Have ActiveX
disabled.

There is not a web page\site I won't go to, and I don't get malware.

Now if your friend downloads stuff he's dependant upon the virus
checker installed. An example, anything download'd (link'd) from
http://www.astalavista.us/ comes with a file name'd RUN.EXE it's
malware, it used to be START.EXE so they change it as required.

Avg comes into play here claiming it's ISTBAR.CL - ZoneAlarm with
virus checking capabilities let it pass.

A decent HOSTS file http://www.everythingisnt.com/hosts.html

--
http://opera.com/free/
 
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SgtMinor
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
Sens Fan Happy In Ohio wrote:

> For several months now, both a laptop system and twice a desktop system,
> I've been fighting with a co-worker's browsing habits. This person claims
> to be visiting strictly legit websites, yet mysteriously ends up in places
> they should not be and gets viruses, spyware, adware and/or trojans that do
> nothing short of disabling the entire system. One laptop had to be
> re-formatted from the mess created on a business trip, and twice now I've
> managed to salvage the desktop system from Trojans and spyware ... but
> nearly at the compromise of my own desktop system trying to visit warez
> sites to grab software in an attempt to clean and lock down this system. I
> don't like using warez products, but sometimes when a company only offers a
> "trial" that will identify and not clean it's tough ... especially with the
> demand to "get it fixed."
>
> Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
> and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
> Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
> including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
> versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
> for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
> tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
> goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
> to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."
>
> So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
> exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
> Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
> says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
> sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
> I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
> that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
> that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
> every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.
>
> I've tried the usual places such as C-Net and such, but I don't really find
> any articles that say "stay away from sites that feature X, Y and Z" ... and
> that's what I need more than anything ... a real bare bones, plain English
> page that states the obvious that most of us regulars and any IT personnel
> know for a fact.
>
> Thanks much!
>


Maybe make the employees themselves accountable for their internet use:

http://www.accountabilityint.com/
 
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FML
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
Sens Fan Happy In Ohio wrote:
> For several months now, both a laptop system and twice a desktop system,
> I've been fighting with a co-worker's browsing habits. This person claims
> to be visiting strictly legit websites, yet mysteriously ends up in places
> they should not be and gets viruses, spyware, adware and/or trojans that do
> nothing short of disabling the entire system. One laptop had to be
> re-formatted from the mess created on a business trip, and twice now I've
> managed to salvage the desktop system from Trojans and spyware ... but
> nearly at the compromise of my own desktop system trying to visit warez
> sites to grab software in an attempt to clean and lock down this system. I
> don't like using warez products, but sometimes when a company only offers a
> "trial" that will identify and not clean it's tough ... especially with the
> demand to "get it fixed."
>
> Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
> and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
> Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
> including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
> versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
> for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
> tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
> goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
> to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."
>
> So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
> exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
> Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
> says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
> sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
> I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
> that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
> that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
> every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.
>
> I've tried the usual places such as C-Net and such, but I don't really find
> any articles that say "stay away from sites that feature X, Y and Z" ... and
> that's what I need more than anything ... a real bare bones, plain English
> page that states the obvious that most of us regulars and any IT personnel
> know for a fact.
>
> Thanks much!
>


Perhaps you should approach it from a different tack. Do the powers that
be in your company understand the liability that they are exposing
themselves to? If a company doesn't actively take steps to prevent
employees from surfing to porn sites, they will get hammered with
charges of creating a "hostile work environment," and all the associated
liabilities that implies. Employers have been found directly and
indirectly liable under these rules for failure to protect their employees.

The small cost of putting into place a comprehensive plan pales in
comparison with the cost of litigating just one complaint (not to
mention any judgement resulting from such litigation).
 
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Sens Fan Happy In Ohio
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
In news:(E-Mail Removed), SgtMinor
<(E-Mail Removed)> first attempted to communicate with pen,
but the writing was small, so next used sidewalk chalk, but the rain washed
it away, and then switched to spray paint and stencils but the cans
exploded, so placed fingers to keyboard for this:
>
> Maybe make the employees themselves accountable for their internet
> use:
> http://www.accountabilityint.com/


No good ... read previous post to FML


 
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Sens Fan Happy In Ohio
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
In news:(E-Mail Removed), FML <(E-Mail Removed)>
first attempted to communicate with pen, but the writing was small, so next
used sidewalk chalk, but the rain washed it away, and then switched to spray
paint and stencils but the cans exploded, so placed fingers to keyboard for
this:
>
> Perhaps you should approach it from a different tack. Do the powers
> that be in your company understand the liability that they are
> exposing themselves to? If a company doesn't actively take steps to
> prevent employees from surfing to porn sites, they will get hammered
> with charges of creating a "hostile work environment," and all the
> associated liabilities that implies. Employers have been found
> directly and indirectly liable under these rules for failure to
> protect their employees.
> The small cost of putting into place a comprehensive plan pales in
> comparison with the cost of litigating just one complaint (not to
> mention any judgement resulting from such litigation).


See that's just the problem ... I said "co-worker" in case someone gave me
some good info that I could print and show my immediate boss. But really
.... the problem is with the owner. He's the one with the bad surfing habits
and its affecting one other employee that goes to places like
SmileyCentral.com and downloads all that cutsey **** that messes up systems.
If the top guy does bad, why can't they all seems to be the motto. Hence
the reason I was trying to get a list of sites and then print them off so to
say, "Mr. Owner you are going to get X, Y and Z because of doing A, B and
C."


 
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Mitch
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
In article <(E-Mail Removed)>, Sens Fan Happy In
Ohio <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

> Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
> and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
> Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
> including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
> versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
> for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
> tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
> goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
> to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."
>
> So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
> exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
> Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
> says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
> sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
> I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
> that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
> that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
> every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.
>
> I've tried the usual places such as C-Net and such, but I don't really find
> any articles that say "stay away from sites that feature X, Y and Z" ... and
> that's what I need more than anything ... a real bare bones, plain English
> page that states the obvious that most of us regulars and any IT personnel
> know for a fact.


You write so much about bad Web sites and have almost no recognition
for where most come from -- e-mail!
Get them to use an e-mail program behaves properly and doesn't
automatically open and share every virus it gets.
Set a good e-mail filter on their server.
And turn off any and all notification from the protection software. If
their biggest problem is the 'intrusion' of the protective tools,
that's fine. There are plenty of free tools, and I'm sure the folks
that know them in this group will know which ones are better about not
being conspicuous.
 
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tech person
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
I have been a computer consulatant for many years and I will now share
something that I had a very VERY hard time learning. Take it for what
it is worth. Since it took me years to learn, you might have already
guessed that I didn't believe it at first.

MYOB...mind your own business. If the owner of the computer doesn't
care, then you should butt out. That will probably be extremely
difficult for you, I was/is almost impossible for me.

It comes down to taking responsibility for your own actions. The owner
is responsible for what happens. When he/she does this action and it
causes a negative reaction, that is their choice. If he/she goes to
Baskin Robins and gets a flavor that you would hate, do you care? Try
to treat this the same way.

It is their choice. You have tried your best to help them make the
right decision, now let them make the decision, right or wrong. A ship
can have only one captain.

I learned that this is a no win situation. The absolute best that can
happen to you, if you persist to try to save this person from
themselves, is nothing. If you suceed, your efforts will be ignored,
but if you fail, you will be held to blame.

You cannot win. By playing the game you could loose, you could break
even, but you can never win this game. The best approach is to not
play at all.

Years ago, I could not do that. When I saw something that I could
improve upon, I would get involved even if the person said no. If I
was right, they wouldn't admit it or thank me. Often, they would chew
me out for interferring. I got in trouble a lot

Worse yet, if I was wrong, I took all the blame. That isn't right, but
it is reality. Too many bosses will side with the person who puts on
the best show, not the one who's intentions were right.

Today, I ask for permission before attempting to fix something. If it
is given, I do my best. If it is not, I walk away. If the **** hits
the fan, I then say "I warned them, I told them I knew how to fix the
problem, they wouldn't let me do it." I now get in trouble a lot less.

One example: years ago, I was working on a tech bench. I saw one
particlar model come on at least three times a week with the same
symptoms. I determined the design defect and added a fuse to keep the
parts from being fried when it happened.

Did I get an award for saving our customers big bucks? Nope. I got
chewed out for changing the design. If the manufacturer wanted a fuse
in there, they would have put one in, I was told. No more fuses.

Is that a crappy commentary on life? Yes, it is. Is it reality? Yes,
it is also that.

My suggestion is to tell the person one last time and then let them do
their job, i.e. making decisions. Tell them what it is that they are
doing, what the results are, how it affects you, and that you can fix
the problem. Then let them choose.

In reading between the lines, it sounds like this might be a job for a
computer professional. You might be a little over your head,
thechnically. Besides, an outsider can say things to the boss that you
could not risk saying

Those companies that offer the products that identify the problem, but
don't fix it, let you download a full version upon payment don't they?
This isn't a "I need the fix RIGHT NOW so I HAVE to use warez" issue,
it is a "I don't want to pay for it so I'll use warez" issue, isn't
it?

I don't want to start a big argument, but... If you can't afford the
cost of programs to protect yourself, you shouldn't be in business.
This opinon does NOT apply to home usage, just business and it is JUST
my opinion.






On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 21:46:32 -0400, "Sens Fan Happy In Ohio"
<(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>For several months now, both a laptop system and twice a desktop system,
>I've been fighting with a co-worker's browsing habits. This person claims
>to be visiting strictly legit websites, yet mysteriously ends up in places
>they should not be and gets viruses, spyware, adware and/or trojans that do
>nothing short of disabling the entire system. One laptop had to be
>re-formatted from the mess created on a business trip, and twice now I've
>managed to salvage the desktop system from Trojans and spyware ... but
>nearly at the compromise of my own desktop system trying to visit warez
>sites to grab software in an attempt to clean and lock down this system. I
>don't like using warez products, but sometimes when a company only offers a
>"trial" that will identify and not clean it's tough ... especially with the
>demand to "get it fixed."
>
>Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
>and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
>Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
>including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
>versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
>for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
>tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
>goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
>to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."
>
>So where can I find online a very good FAQ or other such page that tells
>exactly what sort of "browsing habits" contribute to getting Trojans,
>Spyware, etc. I need something that's truthful and honest, yet basically
>says what any IT person can tell you ... don't go to warez sites, porn
>sites, gaming sites, etc. This person doesn't seem to respond to words, so
>I'm hoping that the written word will get the message loud and clear ...
>that (1) You don't go to these sites or else (2) You'll get infected and
>that (3) You need programs such as the above listed ones to protect each and
>every system, even more so when "exploring" bad sites.
>
>I've tried the usual places such as C-Net and such, but I don't really find
>any articles that say "stay away from sites that feature X, Y and Z" ... and
>that's what I need more than anything ... a real bare bones, plain English
>page that states the obvious that most of us regulars and any IT personnel
>know for a fact.
>
>Thanks much!


 
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Blood Money
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005

Sens Fan Happy In Ohio wrote:
> For several months now, both a laptop system and twice a desktop system,
> I've been fighting with a co-worker's browsing habits. This person claims
> to be visiting strictly legit websites, yet mysteriously ends up in places
> they should not be and gets viruses, spyware, adware and/or trojans that do
> nothing short of disabling the entire system. One laptop had to be
> re-formatted from the mess created on a business trip, and twice now I've
> managed to salvage the desktop system from Trojans and spyware ... but
> nearly at the compromise of my own desktop system trying to visit warez
> sites to grab software in an attempt to clean and lock down this system. I
> don't like using warez products, but sometimes when a company only offers a
> "trial" that will identify and not clean it's tough ... especially with the
> demand to "get it fixed."
>
> Anyhow, my point is this. This co-worker now has a new desktop PC, faster
> and better than before. It only has MS antispyware beta and Symantec
> Corporate anti-virus on it. I'm not allowed to use any other programs,
> including legit versions of CounterSpy and TrojanHunter as well as free
> versions of Ad-Aware and Spybot. Why? "They don't want all the pop-ups"
> for protecting the system, downloading/checking for updates, etc. Now I've
> tried to say that doing this leaves the system wide open for more, but that
> goes in one ear and out the other anymore. The only thing important seems
> to be speed and a lack of anything "popping up."

<snip>

Policies and procedures are worthless if 1.) they are not understood
and followed and/or 2.) they cannot be enforced. If the CEO/owner is
not willing to believe that malware can cost the company thousands or
more, then you might want to consider polishing up your resume and
talking to some prospective employers.

Other than that, MS Antispyware pops up every time something "new"
tries to alter the reg, link a dll, access the Internet, and pretty
much everything else - so it's hard to understand why these people are
not annoyed as Hell.

Also, on a more minor point, you can download a very effective tool for
removing trojans and spyware without going the Warez route (you should
know better than to go to Warez for anything.) Go to
http://www.ewido.net and download their 14 day trial of Ewido Security
Suite. Yes, it's a trial, but it does CLEAN the system and is perhaps
the best tool for the job I've ever seen.

Also, go to http://www.ccleaner.com and use their free tool. It does a
great job of cleaning up the mess left behind by your "unfriendly
visitors." It is not a trial, but it is upgragable (aren't they all?)

>From a tactical standpoint, if you can't get these boneheads to believe

you regarding their ignorant browsing behavior, build a proxy server
with a content filtering system (such as Squid using Dan's Guardian or
Squidguard) and force them to go through it. No questions, no
bargaining, no bullshit. Tell them it will speed up their connectivity
because it caches pages and cuts down on bandwidth usage - which is
true. You can build such a proxy for free - just find an old PC with
two NICs, install a Linux distro (Debian, FreeBSD, whatever) and
install the proxy server. If you have problems, there are mountains of
"How To" documents on the Web.

I've done this for two companies this month and the users have no idea
(I changed the browser settings to use the proxy by using a reg file -
see:
http://lists.webjunction.org/wjlists...il/009347.html)

Of course, the users ask "How come I can't open
www.hereisafreakinvirus.com?"
The company's IT guy says "it's our firewall - it won't allow you go
open viruses on websites."

Seems to work for them.

 
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Blood Money
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Posts: n/a
 
      09-22-2005
Indeed, tech person
- I just posted my response and then read yours. I'd have to go with
your response over mine... but, if the notion should strike him to try
and address the situation - perhaps I've offered something useful.
Then again...


 
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