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Should I buy a UL listed Power Supply?

 
 
loomis
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      03-14-2005
Hello.

I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
my house down?

Thanks
 
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Pennywise@DerryMaine.gov
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      03-14-2005
On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 04:52:13 GMT, loomis <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

|> Hello.
|>
|> I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
|> listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
|> cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
|> the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
|> my house down?

Doesn't a UL mark http://www.ul.com/mark/ pretty much mean they're
satisfied it won't catch fire?

Purchase the UL one.



--
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1775649,00.asp
 
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Blinky the Shark
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      03-14-2005
loomis wrote:

> I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
> listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
> cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
> the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
> my house down?


Looks like you've already got the picture. The only remaining question
is this: are you a gambler?

--
Blinky Linux Registered User 297263
Who has implemented Usenet Solution #45933:
Now killing all posts originating at Google Groups

 
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none
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      03-14-2005
On 14 Mar 2005 07:55:06 GMT, Blinky the Shark <(E-Mail Removed)>
wrote:

>loomis wrote:
>
>> I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
>> listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
>> cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
>> the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
>> my house down?

>
>Looks like you've already got the picture. The only remaining question
>is this: are you a gambler?


Another way of looking at this is: Since it costs the manufacturer so
little to build it to UL specs and get the certification, and since it
adds to the perceived value of the product, why would they not want to
do that? I think it is very scary to buy one that is not certified.

Also, most of the really cheap power supplies have output ratings that
are so far over their real output that it is better to get a good
brand, IMNSHO. Personally, I use Antec 95% of the time and I think the
extra price that I have paid is well worth it.

In the old days, I used to see amplifier specs that were 20 times the
actual output. I have seen a few that were 100 times the real output.
You have to have some skill in reading the specs of any piece of
equipment because they are worded so that an unskilled person will
think it is better than it really is.

I also found it interesting that the magazine reviews of some of those
grossly overrated units used very carefully chosen words in order to
not come right out and say the specs were false. Why not just say "The
manufacturer claims 100 watts, but our tests showed 5 watts of clean
power. Anything over 5 watts was so distorted that it is essentially
unusable."

Could their reluctance to tell the truth in an easily understandable
way be the result of advertising dollars?

But then this is getting too off topic, sorry
 
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Toolman Tim
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      03-15-2005

"loomis" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Hello.
>
> I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
> listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
> cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
> the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
> my house down?
>
> Thanks


All power supplies sold for use in (insert your country here) should be
tested by whatever agencies are authorized to do such testing. In the US,
Underwriter Labratories are *NOT* the only agency doing this kind of
testing. And, tests by some agencies are not approved in countries other
than the one in which they exist. For that reason, some manfacturers choose
testing agencies that are accepted in more areas.

The company I work for manufactures building products. They have to be
tested. Rather than test at US testing facilities, we have them tested at
Canadian facilities. Why? The Canadian test results are accepted in both
Canada and US. But the US agency certifications are not accepted in Canada.
So why would we test in the US? It would be a waste of money. The fact that
our products show certification from labs other than UL does not in any way
show that our products are 'below standard', and in fact, show that we
exceed the US requirements.

That may or may not be the case with the manufacturer of any specific power
supply, but if you look at the label on any PS, there *will* be
certification of some sort.


 
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Lookout
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      03-15-2005
On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 04:52:13 GMT, loomis <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>Hello.
>
>I am in the process of trying to build a PC. I see that one can buy UL
>listed and non-UL listed power supplies. The UL listed ones seem to
>cost a little more. Should I get a UL listed or not listed one? Will
>the non-listed one die faster or worse, destroy my motherboard or burn
>my house down?
>
>Thanks


4 out of 5 dentists prefer URL listed power supplies.
 
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samdib99 samdib99 is offline
Junior Member
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1
 
      06-13-2012
I am a distributor of 12 volt power supplies (and have 5 years experience in the market.) I can assure that the difference between a UL listed power supply and a non UL listed power supply is Huge.

For our units (on www.12vadapters.com), our non UL units have a failure rate of 1%, or 1 in 100. For our UL listed units, the failure rate is close to 0%, as in I barely remember anyone ever returning a unit as having failed or been defective. There is a 10% price difference, but a huge difference in failure rate. Why is this?

UL listing means that the product (any product) is examined, tested, and meets a minimum standard of quality. For a 12V power supply, this means the wiring has to be a certain thickness, the soldering has to be a certain strength, the power produced has to have a noise threshold that is below a pre-defined level. The non-UL units have no such quality standard or overseer, and are completely in the hands of the chinese factory, which wants to produce them as cheap as possible...

For any device that is valuable (such as a hard drive), or critical, such as medical equipment, or sensitive to line noise, such as audio recording gear, it is really worth the upgrade to a UL listed unit.

Sam Dib
Owner
12vAdapters.com
 
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