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Well featured mobo for cost-effective PC?

 
 
Jeff Conescu
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting edge,
but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor. The
budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can keep it
low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so there's
some motivation to keep the price down.

At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't kept
up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and pricing
issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one of the 'C'
800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at the
moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent familiarity means
I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for less,
I'm all ears.

All advice appreciated.

[All follow-ups set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk only]


 
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Gorbag
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Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
MSI. Best lower priced boards.

G



"Jeff Conescu" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41b2f01e$0$25775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
> internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting edge,
> but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor. The
> budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can keep
> it
> low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so there's
> some motivation to keep the price down.
>
> At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
> or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't
> kept
> up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and pricing
> issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one of the
> 'C'
> 800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at the
> moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent familiarity means
> I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
> direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for less,
> I'm all ears.
>
> All advice appreciated.
>
> [All follow-ups set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk only]
>
>



 
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Bruce T. Berger
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
Why would you overclock a general use computer? It's just asking for
trouble.

btb

"Jeff Conescu" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41b2f01e$0$25775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
> internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting edge,
> but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor. The
> budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can keep
> it
> low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so there's
> some motivation to keep the price down.
>
> At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
> or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't
> kept
> up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and pricing
> issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one of the
> 'C'
> 800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at the
> moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent familiarity means
> I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
> direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for less,
> I'm all ears.
>
> All advice appreciated.
>
> [All follow-ups set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk only]
>
>



 
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Ruel Smith
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
Jeff Conescu wrote:

> I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
> internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting edge,
> but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor. The
> budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can keep
> it low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so
> there's some motivation to keep the price down.
>
> At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
> or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't
> kept up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and
> pricing issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one
> of the 'C' 800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for
> buck at the moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent
> familiarity means I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can
> point me in the direction of any recent developments which would let me do
> more for less, I'm all ears.


The cost of the processor is your biggest problem with any Intel system. You
can find good boards are reasonable prices everywhere.

However, the best bang for the buck and the cheapest isn't always the same.
The best motherboard for the money is hands down the Asus P4P800-E Deluxe.
It's currently about $112 US. It's rock solid. If you're just looking for
something with less features and less money than that, then take a look at
the MSI 865PE NEO2-V for $72 US. The MSI board contains Fuzzy Logic, where
it dynamically overclocks your CPU on demand. Therefore, it runs normally
when it's no on load, keeping it cool, and throttles up under load to give
you peak perfromance. Pretty nice...

 
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Oxford Systems
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
"Jeff Conescu" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41b2f01e$0$25775$(E-Mail Removed)...
[snip]

>I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at the
> moment, but chipset driver hassles


What chipset driver hassles? Get an NForce2 based board and stay away from
VIA (even they have gotten much better) and there are no "chipset driver
hassles" to speak of.


> and a lack of recent familiarity means
> I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
> direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for less,
> I'm all ears.


Sure. For around $200.00 US, snatch up an Athlox XP 2500 Barton core (while
there are some left to snatch -- get a mobile unit if you really want to
crank it up and don't mind seeing an "unknown processor" error at POST),
throw it an an ABIT NF7/AN7 series motherboard, put on a decent heatsink,
crank up the front side bus until the system is just on the edge of stable
and then back it down a few megahertz for "bang for the buck" system that
will fly.

Example of the Abit NF7-S here:
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...127-166&depa=1


Example of the Abit AN7 here:

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...127-167&depa=1


Standard AMD Athlon XP 2500 Barton here:
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...127-167&depa=1

Mobile AMD Athlon XP 2500 Barton here:
http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProduc...103-401&depa=1

The advantages of the mobile version of the processor are an unlocked
multiplier, a lower rated operating voltage at rated speed (more headroom
for overclocking), lower power dissipation (until you crank up the core
voltage) and the ability to consistently overclock to Athlon XP 3200 class
speeds among most examples.

If you can beat that combo for $200.00 US with an Intel based setup, let me
know.


 
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Oxford Systems
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004

"Bruce T. Berger" <btb@Ican'tstandspam.no> wrote in message
news:wQCsd.2403$(E-Mail Removed)...
> Why would you overclock a general use computer? It's just asking for
> trouble.


I'd be interested to know why you *think* that is true.


 
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Terje Johan Abrahamsen
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004

"Gorbag" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41b2f30b$0$53011$(E-Mail Removed)...
> MSI. Best lower priced boards.


Agrees. I have a dual processor MSI board for my server. It is rock
solid....


>
> "Jeff Conescu" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:41b2f01e$0$25775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> > I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
> > internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting

edge,
> > but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor.

The
> > budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can

keep
> > it
> > low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so

there's
> > some motivation to keep the price down.
> >
> > At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit

IS7
> > or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't
> > kept
> > up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and

pricing
> > issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one of the
> > 'C'
> > 800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at

the
> > moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent familiarity

means
> > I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
> > direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for

less,
> > I'm all ears.
> >
> > All advice appreciated.
> >
> > [All follow-ups set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk only]
> >
> >

>
>



 
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Lady Chatterly
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
In article <NfEsd.1886$(E-Mail Removed) et>
Oxford Systems <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
>Sure. For around $200.00 US, snatch up an Athlox XP 2500 Barton core (while
>there are some left to snatch -- get a mobile unit if you really want to
>crank it up and don't mind seeing an "unknown processor" error at POST),
>throw it an an ABIT NF7/AN7 series motherboard, put on a decent heatsink,
>crank up the front side bus until the system is just on the edge of stable
>and then back it down a few megahertz for "bang for the buck" system that
>will fly.


In his alternate universe.

--
Lady Chatterly

"The imprimatur of Lady Chatterly. I'm so jealous." -- Dr. Zen

 
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=?ISO-8859-1?Q?Je=DFus?=
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
Jeff Conescu wrote:

> At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
> or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4.


Check out the Asus P4P800E, its loaded with features for the price and IMO
vastly better than the AI7 (I have both boards).
I paid about $170 for mine.

I can o/clock much higher with the Asus with greater stability compared to
the Abit. Currently it has a 3.06GHz running at ~3.3GHz with average temps
under 40C, which is pretty good considering (keeping in mind Im not too
concerned about o/clocking to the limit).

You get just about all the right features such as SATA, RAID, 7.1 sound,
Gigabit LAN, 11.b wireless LAN, Firewire... and a AGP slot of course.
The BIOS is better than the Abit, as is the monitoring and o/clocking
software that comes with it.

To be honest Im not entirely happy with my AI7... its a little cantankerous
and has a few annoying traits in my book. I bought into the good reputation
Abit has, instead of sticking with Asus... wish I hadn't in hindsight.

Can you tell which board I prefer?

Then again, maybe the AI7 is now much cheaper than the P4P800E? Im not sure
what the current prices are but I know that I essentially paid the same
amount for both mobos only a couple of months apart.



--
/Jeus/
 
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Rob
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      12-05-2004
you can shave off some bucks by foregoing the 800mhz FSB
and perhaps going with a socket 478 celeron.

"Jeff Conescu" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:41b2f01e$0$25775$(E-Mail Removed)...
> I've been charged with building a PC for a friend for general use -
> internet, games, office applications. It doesn't need to be cutting edge,
> but I'd rather not use an integrated video card or Celeron processor. The
> budget extends to around $1200 Australian (c. $800 US), but if I can keep
> it
> low enough, a 17" LCD might be in the picture instead of a CRT, so there's
> some motivation to keep the price down.
>
> At the moment, I'm leaning towards a Socket 478 board such as the Abit IS7
> or AI7, in combination with an overclocked 2.8Ghz P4. I really haven't
> kept
> up with hardware over the last 6-12 months, but given the heat and pricing
> issues of the latest Intel processors, I'm keen to stick with one of the
> 'C'
> 800fsb variety. I understand AMD are probably better bang for buck at the
> moment, but chipset driver hassles and a lack of recent familiarity means
> I'm inclined to stick with a Pentium. But if anyone can point me in the
> direction of any recent developments which would let me do more for less,
> I'm all ears.
>
> All advice appreciated.
>
> [All follow-ups set to 24hoursupport.helpdesk only]
>
>



 
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