Velocity Reviews - Computer Hardware Reviews

Velocity Reviews > Newsgroups > Computing > Computer Support > Microsoft security flaws test loyal users' patience

Reply
Thread Tools

Microsoft security flaws test loyal users' patience

 
 
Tech
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-19-2004

By Suzanne Choney

UNION-TRIBUNE July 19, 2004


By the time you read this, I will have spent a portion of the weekend
updating my home PC yet again to deal with Microsoft's security holes.
Maybe you ended up doing the same thing, too.

Last week, the company issued two "critical" updates mainly affecting those
who use the Windows XP and Windows 2000 operating systems, plus five other
updates rated as "important" or "moderate" in terms of system
vulnerabilities.

If you're as tired of this as I am, maybe you're considering switching to
Mac or Linux. "Oh, don't go there," you say.

I understand. Almost all the world's computer users are dependent on ?
notice I didn't say "depend on" ? Windows.

Maybe you don't consider switching a practical way to go. Maybe you don't
care for Macs, and maybe you don't want to take the time to learn Linux.

But ask yourself how much time you're spending to maintain a system that
has more woes than wows, and whether it's worth it.

At home, I use both Windows and Mac. But because of the recent problems
involving holes in Internet Explorer, Microsoft's Web browser, for the
immediate future, I have limited my Web surfing to the Mac.

I alternate between Apple's Safari Web browser and Internet Explorer. (Mac
and Linux users of IE are not affected by the current problem.)

Also, I plan to spend some time looking at other Web browsers that will
work with the PC, such as Mozilla or Opera.

(For more information about how to switch browsers, see today's Q & A:
Windows.)

Are all these other options ? Mac, Linux, Mozilla, Opera ? bulletproof?
They are not.

Apple, for example, last month issued a security patch for its OS X
operating system.

It was an unusual occurrence; the Mac operating system, no matter what
version,

isn't as vulnerable to viruses and security flaws as Windows.

Some say that's because of the system architecture.

Others contend it's because those who write malicious software, or
"malware," such as viruses and worms don't want to waste their precious
time on a system used by only 2 percent to 3 percent of computer users.
That's roughly Apple's share of the computer market.

A few weeks ago, Mozilla announced that a security "vulnerability" had been
discovered in its Firefox Web browser for Windows users, and issued a fix.
(Again, as with IE, Mac and Linux users were not affected by the problem.)

No system is bulletproof. But Windows, the one most of us use, is riddled
with holes.


Service packs

The company's Windows XP Service Pack 2, a major group of fixes to XP that
includes improved security features, has been behind schedule.

It was due out in June; now it's slated to be released next month.

Think of a service pack as a kind of ice pack for your computer's operating
system, helping to make it feel better.

Service packs contain all fixes, security updates, critical updates, and
other updates created since the original version of a product was released.

Windows XP Service Pack 1 came out in September 2002.

Service packs are honking in size. Windows XP Service Pack 2 may require
about 70 mega-bytes of space for XP Home edition and about 90 megabytes for
XP Professional edition.

When it becomes available, it can be downloaded from Microsoft, or sent to
you on a CD for about $10.

If you have Windows' Automatic Update feature and have been using it, you
probably won't be stuck with a lot to download when Service Pack 2 is
issued.


Weariness

Last week at a conference of Windows software and hardware companies,
Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer reiterated the company's
vow to make its software more secure.

"We've made, I think, at least a year or more of progress on security in
the last year; we're not perfect," Reuters quoted Ballmer as saying. "We're
not where we need to be."

In January 2002, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates issued a companywide memo
calling on Microsoft to make its products "trustworthy."

More than 2.5 years later, it's a good bet that consumers and businesses
don't trust Microsoft any more now than then.

If anything, a deeper sense of wariness and weariness has set in, along
with a host of newer and more vicious worms, viruses and vulnerabilities
than ever before.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/c...b19choney.html

--
__
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
D
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
say again

"Tech" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:999f1e03aeb45298f6f3e0b499759848@news.1usenet .com...
>
> By Suzanne Choney
>
> UNION-TRIBUNE July 19, 2004
>
>
> By the time you read this, I will have spent a portion of the weekend
> updating my home PC yet again to deal with Microsoft's security holes.
> Maybe you ended up doing the same thing, too.
>
> Last week, the company issued two "critical" updates mainly affecting

those
> who use the Windows XP and Windows 2000 operating systems, plus five other
> updates rated as "important" or "moderate" in terms of system
> vulnerabilities.
>
> If you're as tired of this as I am, maybe you're considering switching to
> Mac or Linux. "Oh, don't go there," you say.
>
> I understand. Almost all the world's computer users are dependent on ?
> notice I didn't say "depend on" ? Windows.
>
> Maybe you don't consider switching a practical way to go. Maybe you don't
> care for Macs, and maybe you don't want to take the time to learn Linux.
>
> But ask yourself how much time you're spending to maintain a system that
> has more woes than wows, and whether it's worth it.
>
> At home, I use both Windows and Mac. But because of the recent problems
> involving holes in Internet Explorer, Microsoft's Web browser, for the
> immediate future, I have limited my Web surfing to the Mac.
>
> I alternate between Apple's Safari Web browser and Internet Explorer. (Mac
> and Linux users of IE are not affected by the current problem.)
>
> Also, I plan to spend some time looking at other Web browsers that will
> work with the PC, such as Mozilla or Opera.
>
> (For more information about how to switch browsers, see today's Q & A:
> Windows.)
>
> Are all these other options ? Mac, Linux, Mozilla, Opera ? bulletproof?
> They are not.
>
> Apple, for example, last month issued a security patch for its OS X
> operating system.
>
> It was an unusual occurrence; the Mac operating system, no matter what
> version,
>
> isn't as vulnerable to viruses and security flaws as Windows.
>
> Some say that's because of the system architecture.
>
> Others contend it's because those who write malicious software, or
> "malware," such as viruses and worms don't want to waste their precious
> time on a system used by only 2 percent to 3 percent of computer users.
> That's roughly Apple's share of the computer market.
>
> A few weeks ago, Mozilla announced that a security "vulnerability" had

been
> discovered in its Firefox Web browser for Windows users, and issued a fix.
> (Again, as with IE, Mac and Linux users were not affected by the problem.)
>
> No system is bulletproof. But Windows, the one most of us use, is riddled
> with holes.
>
>
> Service packs
>
> The company's Windows XP Service Pack 2, a major group of fixes to XP that
> includes improved security features, has been behind schedule.
>
> It was due out in June; now it's slated to be released next month.
>
> Think of a service pack as a kind of ice pack for your computer's

operating
> system, helping to make it feel better.
>
> Service packs contain all fixes, security updates, critical updates, and
> other updates created since the original version of a product was

released.
>
> Windows XP Service Pack 1 came out in September 2002.
>
> Service packs are honking in size. Windows XP Service Pack 2 may require
> about 70 mega-bytes of space for XP Home edition and about 90 megabytes

for
> XP Professional edition.
>
> When it becomes available, it can be downloaded from Microsoft, or sent to
> you on a CD for about $10.
>
> If you have Windows' Automatic Update feature and have been using it, you
> probably won't be stuck with a lot to download when Service Pack 2 is
> issued.
>
>
> Weariness
>
> Last week at a conference of Windows software and hardware companies,
> Microsoft Chief Executive Officer Steve Ballmer reiterated the company's
> vow to make its software more secure.
>
> "We've made, I think, at least a year or more of progress on security in
> the last year; we're not perfect," Reuters quoted Ballmer as saying.

"We're
> not where we need to be."
>
> In January 2002, Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates issued a companywide memo
> calling on Microsoft to make its products "trustworthy."
>
> More than 2.5 years later, it's a good bet that consumers and businesses
> don't trust Microsoft any more now than then.
>
> If anything, a deeper sense of wariness and weariness has set in, along
> with a host of newer and more vicious worms, viruses and vulnerabilities
> than ever before.
>
>

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/c...b19choney.html
>
> --
> __



 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
 
The Great Cornholio
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
On Mon, 19 Jul 2004 23:36:54 GMT, Tech <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

#
#By Suzanne Choney
#
#UNION-TRIBUNE July 19, 2004
#
#
# By the time you read this, I will have spent a portion of the
#weekend updating my home PC yet again to deal with Microsoft's
#security holes.

Well I just moved house an hooked up my Suse9.1 box after 2 weeks off
the net. Ran YAST and got a grand total of 31 updates. Not all
critical I'm sure but it does include the 2nd kernel upgrade since I
installed it 5 weeks ago.
--

Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.
 
Reply With Quote
 
Duane Arnold
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Miss Hollywood Reporter, why can't you show one ounce of expertise in your
bones on either MS or Linux and try to help someone? As of to date, has
anyone seen anything else but the *Hollywood* posts. Is it possible in our
life time that you can do anything else, but pour that cup of coffee and
read and post news clips?

Duane
 
Reply With Quote
 
Scraggy
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Duane Arnold wrote:
> Miss Hollywood Reporter, why can't you show one ounce of expertise in
> your bones on either MS or Linux and try to help someone? As of to
> date, has anyone seen anything else but the *Hollywood* posts. Is it
> possible in our life time that you can do anything else, but pour
> that cup of coffee and read and post news clips?
>
> Duane


I think you are probably one of the few that have not binned the fool.

--
Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.


 
Reply With Quote
 
DC
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Scraggy wrote:
> Duane Arnold wrote:
>> Miss Hollywood Reporter, why can't you show one ounce of expertise in
>> your bones on either MS or Linux and try to help someone? As of to
>> date, has anyone seen anything else but the *Hollywood* posts. Is it
>> possible in our life time that you can do anything else, but pour
>> that cup of coffee and read and post news clips?


>> Duane


> I think you are probably one of the few that have not binned the fool.



Yes, and if he would stop encouraging him, he just might get bored and
leave us all the hell alone.

For Duane: wipe the smile off yer face and take a hint, why don'tcha?

--
DC Linux RU #1000111011000111001

Why I love Open Source: http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=111601
 
Reply With Quote
 
Tech
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Duane Arnold wrote:

> Is it possible in our
> life time that you can do anything else,
>
> Duane


No.

--
__
 
Reply With Quote
 
Duane Arnold
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
>
> For Duane: wipe the smile off yer face and take a hint, why don'tcha?
>


What smile on my face is that?

You mean that of greetings, don't worry be happy life is too short, and
don't let it get you down behind -- Duane

I suggest you drop dead about it. Do you get that?

Duane
 
Reply With Quote
 
Duane Arnold
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Tech <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in news:ea019b9e639507f78aca4c832fec5197
@news.1usenet.com:

> Duane Arnold wrote:
>
>> Is it possible in our
>> life time that you can do anything else,
>>
>> Duane

>
> No.
>


I didn't think so, because I don't think you can do anything else. That's
just my take on the whole situation, *Hollywood*.

Duane
 
Reply With Quote
 
DC
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      07-20-2004
Duane Arnold wrote:

>> For Duane: wipe the smile off yer face and take a hint, why don'tcha?


> I suggest you drop dead about it. Do you get that?


You're just lack-toes intolerant. }:O)

--
DC Linux RU #1000111011000111001

Why I love Open Source: http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=111601
 
Reply With Quote
 
 
 
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Microsoft warns of "critical" security flaws imhotep Computer Security 8 09-10-2010 06:14 PM
Mozilla gets help from Microsoft to fix security flaws Mosley Jones III Firefox 10 10-08-2006 06:27 PM
More Microsoft Security Flaws Au79 Computer Support 0 04-29-2006 06:25 AM
Clueless, have patience... Amanda Wireless Networking 1 08-07-2004 03:14 PM
test test test test test test test Computer Support 2 07-02-2003 06:02 PM



Advertisments