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How does Windows XP Activiation Work?

 
 
Julie P.
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-18-2004
I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually say
"pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before you are allowed
to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you install it on only one
computer. I experienced this a few days ago, and since I was unable to
connect to the Internet after installation, I had to phone the code into
Microsoft.

1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this computer and
install it on another one instead? When I go to activate XP, how will
Microsoft know that I have actually uninstalled it from my other computer,
especially if I don't go online at all so they can "read" my other computer?

2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical reasons?
How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a new installation?
Does the code that XP spits out once installed include some kind of unique
ID for the computer it was installed on?

3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came with my
new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with it, like the one
that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I bought. I only have a very
small leaflet.

4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use XP for 30
days before being required to activate it. This was not the case when I
reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me access my computer until
I activated it, either via the Internet or via telephone. I had to walk to a
payphone to do this. I did not like how Microsoft held my computer hostage
during this time. It should have given me an option to immediately uninstall
XP. Plus, what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does
their computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
(Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office dictionary for
being misspelled!).


 
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Blackmesa8
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-18-2004
j00 were owned by m$crosoft


 
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Toolman Tim
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      06-18-2004
Replies "mixed in"...

"Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)
> > I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually
> > say "pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before
> > you are allowed to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you
> > install it on only one computer. I experienced this a few days ago,
> > and since I was unable to connect to the Internet after
> > installation, I had to phone the code into Microsoft.
> >
> > 1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this
> > computer and install it on another one instead? When I go to
> > activate XP, how will Microsoft know that I have actually
> > uninstalled it from my other computer, especially if I don't go
> > online at all so they can "read" my other computer?


Microsoft won't know until you try to activate it. Your code is already
matched up to the hardware in the first computer (mobo, HD, etc.).

> > 2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical
> > reasons? How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a
> > new installation? Does the code that XP spits out once installed
> > include some kind of unique ID for the computer it was installed on?


The code is matched up to the hardware's serial/model numbers. Yes, it is
unique to the hardware.

> > 3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came
> > with my new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with
> > it, like the one that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I
> > bought. I only have a very small leaflet.


Dell has fully licensed the XP operating system for your computer. You
should have a sticker on the side of your case that contains the key. The
installation CD sent with Dell computers is modified and will only install
on Dell systems.

> > 4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use
> > XP for 30 days before being required to activate it. This was not
> > the case when I reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me
> > access my computer until I activated it, either via the Internet or
> > via telephone. I had to walk to a payphone to do this. I did not
> > like how Microsoft held my computer hostage during this time. It
> > should have given me an option to immediately uninstall XP. Plus,
> > what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does their
> > computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
> > (Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office
> > dictionary for being misspelled!).


If the OS is not activated after 30 days, you will only be able to
accomplish one thing when you start the computer: you can activate it. If
you don't, it will shut down. Since there was no "old" OS on the system,
there is nothing to revert back to.

I don't fully understand the lack of 30 days in your case, although I have
ran into this problem on repair (not reinstall) jobs. If, for instance, when
it was necessary to do a repair from Windows XP setup disk, the files on the
system showed that it had been in use for more than 30 days, but the repair
install says it isn't activated anymore, and requires re-activation.

--
"If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die, I want to go where
THEY went." ~Will Rogers~


 
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Julie P.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-18-2004
"Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> Replies "mixed in"...
>
> "Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)
> > > I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually
> > > say "pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before
> > > you are allowed to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you
> > > install it on only one computer. I experienced this a few days ago,
> > > and since I was unable to connect to the Internet after
> > > installation, I had to phone the code into Microsoft.
> > >
> > > 1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this
> > > computer and install it on another one instead? When I go to
> > > activate XP, how will Microsoft know that I have actually
> > > uninstalled it from my other computer, especially if I don't go
> > > online at all so they can "read" my other computer?

>
> Microsoft won't know until you try to activate it. Your code is already
> matched up to the hardware in the first computer (mobo, HD, etc.).
>
> > > 2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical
> > > reasons? How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a
> > > new installation? Does the code that XP spits out once installed
> > > include some kind of unique ID for the computer it was installed on?

>
> The code is matched up to the hardware's serial/model numbers. Yes, it is
> unique to the hardware.



Wait, I thought when you bought OS software, and you sold the computer, you
had two choices:

1) sell the computer with the OS installed along with the OS CD, or
2) keep the OS CD for yourself, and remove the OS from the computer before
selling it.

For example, many computers sold on eBay don't come with an OS, so you may
need to keep your old OS when you buy another computer.

So don't I have the right to remove XP from my Dell computer, and install it
on a another computer of my choosing, since I retain full license of Windows
XP? I can do this with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I bought.


>
> > > 3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came
> > > with my new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with
> > > it, like the one that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I
> > > bought. I only have a very small leaflet.

>
> Dell has fully licensed the XP operating system for your computer. You
> should have a sticker on the side of your case that contains the key. The
> installation CD sent with Dell computers is modified and will only install
> on Dell systems.
>


which sucks. If I have full license, then I should be able to install XP on
another PC too, as long as I remove it first from my Dell.

> > > 4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use
> > > XP for 30 days before being required to activate it. This was not
> > > the case when I reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me
> > > access my computer until I activated it, either via the Internet or
> > > via telephone. I had to walk to a payphone to do this. I did not
> > > like how Microsoft held my computer hostage during this time. It
> > > should have given me an option to immediately uninstall XP. Plus,
> > > what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does their
> > > computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
> > > (Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office
> > > dictionary for being misspelled!).

>
> If the OS is not activated after 30 days, you will only be able to
> accomplish one thing when you start the computer: you can activate it.


what if you used the XP OS to upgrade from another version though? and you
fail to activate. It should revert back to your old OS after 30 days.

If
> you don't, it will shut down. Since there was no "old" OS on the system,
> there is nothing to revert back to.



In my case, there was an old OS: Windows XP.

>
> I don't fully understand the lack of 30 days in your case, although I have
> ran into this problem on repair (not reinstall) jobs. If, for instance,

when
> it was necessary to do a repair from Windows XP setup disk, the files on

the
> system showed that it had been in use for more than 30 days, but the

repair
> install says it isn't activated anymore, and requires re-activation.
>


Well, it kept on asking me how I wanted to activate XP: via computer or via
telephone. It did not give me other options. And I did not try turning my
computer off.


 
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Toolman Tim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-18-2004
"Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
| "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
| news:(E-Mail Removed)...
| > Replies "mixed in"...
| >
| > "Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
| > news:(E-Mail Removed)
| > > I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually
| > > say "pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before
| > > you are allowed to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you
| > > install it on only one computer. I experienced this a few days ago,
| > > and since I was unable to connect to the Internet after
| > > installation, I had to phone the code into Microsoft.
| > >
| > > 1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this
| > > computer and install it on another one instead? When I go to
| > > activate XP, how will Microsoft know that I have actually
| > > uninstalled it from my other computer, especially if I don't go
| > > online at all so they can "read" my other computer?
| >
| > Microsoft won't know until you try to activate it. Your code is already
| > matched up to the hardware in the first computer (mobo, HD, etc.).
| >
| > > 2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical
| > > reasons? How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a
| > > new installation? Does the code that XP spits out once installed
| > > include some kind of unique ID for the computer it was installed on?
| >
| > The code is matched up to the hardware's serial/model numbers. Yes, it
is
| > unique to the hardware.
| |
| Wait, I thought when you bought OS software, and you sold the computer,
you
| had two choices:
|
| 1) sell the computer with the OS installed along with the OS CD, or
| 2) keep the OS CD for yourself, and remove the OS from the computer before
| selling it.
|
| For example, many computers sold on eBay don't come with an OS, so you may
| need to keep your old OS when you buy another computer.
|
| So don't I have the right to remove XP from my Dell computer, and install
it
| on a another computer of my choosing, since I retain full license of
Windows
| XP? I can do this with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I bought.

Technically you are correct. But the CD from Dell won't install on a
non-Dell computer (except machines shipped very early in the life of XP -
some of those did ship with standard CDs from MS, but only for a few months
in 2001/2002).

| > > > 3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came
| > > > with my new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with
| > > > it, like the one that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I
| > > > bought. I only have a very small leaflet.
| >
| > Dell has fully licensed the XP operating system for your computer. You
| > should have a sticker on the side of your case that contains the key.
The
| > installation CD sent with Dell computers is modified and will only
install
| > on Dell systems.
| >
|
| which sucks. If I have full license, then I should be able to install XP
on
| another PC too, as long as I remove it first from my Dell.
|
| > > > 4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use
| > > > XP for 30 days before being required to activate it. This was not
| > > > the case when I reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me
| > > > access my computer until I activated it, either via the Internet or
| > > > via telephone. I had to walk to a payphone to do this. I did not
| > > > like how Microsoft held my computer hostage during this time. It
| > > > should have given me an option to immediately uninstall XP. Plus,
| > > > what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does their
| > > > computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
| > > > (Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office
| > > > dictionary for being misspelled!).
| >
| > If the OS is not activated after 30 days, you will only be able to
| > accomplish one thing when you start the computer: you can activate it.
|
| what if you used the XP OS to upgrade from another version though? and you
| fail to activate. It should revert back to your old OS after 30 days.

If you did an upgrade from 98, ME, 2000, etc., you would have been given the
option to uninstall. If you used the upgrade CD to do a "clean" install, you
would have to erase the HD, and reinstall the old OS.

| > If you don't, it will shut down. Since there was no "old" OS on the
system,
| > there is nothing to revert back to.
|
|
| In my case, there was an old OS: Windows XP.

You upgraded from XP to XP?

| > I don't fully understand the lack of 30 days in your case, although I
have
| > ran into this problem on repair (not reinstall) jobs. If, for instance,
| when
| > it was necessary to do a repair from Windows XP setup disk, the files on
| the
| > system showed that it had been in use for more than 30 days, but the
| repair
| > install says it isn't activated anymore, and requires re-activation.
| >
|
| Well, it kept on asking me how I wanted to activate XP: via computer or
via
| telephone. It did not give me other options. And I did not try turning my
| computer off.

It wouldn't have helped - the next time you turned it on you would have
needed to activate anyway (or shut down).

Apparently, you did upgrade from XP to XP. That deactivates the OS on the
computer. So it needs to be activated. And since the computer had been in
use for more than 30 days before the upgrade, you had run out of time to
activate. Catch 22.

Why did you upgrade XP to XP? Home to Pro?


 
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Julie P.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-19-2004
"Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...

>
> If you did an upgrade from 98, ME, 2000, etc., you would have been given

the
> option to uninstall. If you used the upgrade CD to do a "clean" install,

you
> would have to erase the HD, and reinstall the old OS.
>



ok, this makes sense.

>
> Apparently, you did upgrade from XP to XP. That deactivates the OS on the
> computer. So it needs to be activated. And since the computer had been in
> use for more than 30 days before the upgrade, you had run out of time to
> activate. Catch 22.



but if it deactivated the original OS, how did it know I had been using XP
for more than 30 days?

>
> Why did you upgrade XP to XP? Home to Pro?
>



Because I had to reinstall XP because I thought I had problems with IE and
OE, as well as other problems. I though reinstalling XP would solve these
problems. Geez...sometimes I hate Microsoft!


 
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Ron Martell
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-19-2004
"Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:

>I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually say
>"pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before you are allowed
>to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you install it on only one
>computer. I experienced this a few days ago, and since I was unable to
>connect to the Internet after installation, I had to phone the code into
>Microsoft.
>
>1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this computer and
>install it on another one instead? When I go to activate XP, how will
>Microsoft know that I have actually uninstalled it from my other computer,
>especially if I don't go online at all so they can "read" my other computer?


Two different answers, depending on your specific Windows XP License.

- Windows XP Retail License - The software comes in a Green (Home) or
Blue (Pro) Microsoft retail box. That software is licensed to the
purchaser and may be moved from computer to computer to computer at
the discretion of the purchaser, provided that it is only ever
installed on a single computer at any given point in time.

Insofar as validating the uninstall is concerned, Microsoft will take
your word for it. However if you ever do have it on more than one
computer and you do major hardware changes so as to require
reactivation then the fecal matter may impact the impeller.

>
>2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical reasons?
>How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a new installation?
>Does the code that XP spits out once installed include some kind of unique
>ID for the computer it was installed on?


If you reformat and reinstall on the same computer then the activation
control files on the hard drive will have been erased and you will
have to reactivate. When you reactivate the new control information
is compared to the activation information currently on file at
Microsoft and if it is the same, or within the allowable tolerance,
then the reactivation will proceed automatically.

>
>3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came with my
>new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with it, like the one
>that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I bought. I only have a very
>small leaflet.


You have a licensed version of XP Home, no doubt about that, but it is
what is called an OEM version. For a variety of reasons it is still
called Microsoft Windows but in reality it should perhaps be referred
to as "Dell Windows, licensed from Microsoft".

Because it is an OEM version the End User License Agreement has some
specific terms and conditions that are different from those associated
with the retail versions of Windows XP. The major difference is that
licenses for OEM versions of Windows are permanently locked to the
first computer that they are installed on and may be be legitimately
moved to another computer under any circumstances, even if the
original computer is lost, scrapped, destroyed, or stolen - the
license goes with it and suffers the same fate.

You should familiarize yourself with the terms and conditions of the
Windows License for your specific computer. These are contained in
the file EULA.TXT in the c:\windows\system32 folder.

>
>4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use XP for 30
>days before being required to activate it. This was not the case when I
>reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me access my computer until
>I activated it, either via the Internet or via telephone. I had to walk to a
>payphone to do this. I did not like how Microsoft held my computer hostage
>during this time. It should have given me an option to immediately uninstall
>XP. Plus, what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does
>their computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
>(Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office dictionary for
>being misspelled!).
>


The 30 days is on a newly installed copy.

If you had been allowed to uninstall Windows XP, what operating system
would have been in place on the computer? I thought you said that
your Dell computer came with Windows XP preinstalled in which case
there would have been nothing to go back to even if an uninstall
option was provided.

For more information about Windows Activation see MVP Alex Nichol's
article at http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm

For more information about OEM software see my article at
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca/oem_software.htm

Good luck


Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

"The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."
 
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Toolman Tim
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-19-2004
"Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)
> > "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> >
> > >
> > > If you did an upgrade from 98, ME, 2000, etc., you would have
> > > been given the option to uninstall. If you used the upgrade CD to
> > > do a "clean" install, you would have to erase the HD, and
> > > reinstall the old OS.
> > >

> >
> >
> > ok, this makes sense.
> >
> > >
> > > Apparently, you did upgrade from XP to XP. That deactivates the
> > > OS on the computer. So it needs to be activated. And since the
> > > computer had been in use for more than 30 days before the
> > > upgrade, you had run out of time to activate. Catch 22.

> >
> >
> > but if it deactivated the original OS, how did it know I had been
> > using XP for more than 30 days?
> >


Simple. The "old" system still had files in place with dates on them more
than 30 days old. You didn't format the drive, so the original files were
still there. The system still knew the date it was first used, hence, 30
days from THAT date had already expired. That is exactly what I was talking
about the first time regarding using the XP "Repair" function from the OS
CD.

> > >
> > > Why did you upgrade XP to XP? Home to Pro?
> > >

> >
> >
> > Because I had to reinstall XP because I thought I had problems with
> > IE and OE, as well as other problems. I though reinstalling XP
> > would solve these problems. Geez...sometimes I hate Microsoft!


Not me. I understand fully why they want this activation stuff. Do you have
any clue how many pirated copies of earlier versions of Windows exist out
there? Or MS Office? IMO, they have the right to protect their intellectual
property from theft, just like I have the right to protect my home from
theft.

As for the "other" MS problems, most, if not all, are caused not by MS
software (OS, Office, IE, OE, etc.) but by hackers, trojans, spyware, other
malware, poorly written applications from other vendors, and even
operator/user errors. I have systems at work that have been running trouble
free literally for years. And others - same hardware, same software,
different *users* - that get screwed up all the time.


 
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Julie P.
Guest
Posts: n/a
 
      06-19-2004

"Ron Martell" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote:
>
> >I noticed while reading my Windows XP manual, or I should actually say
> >"pamphlet", that Microsoft uses an activation process before you are

allowed
> >to (re-)install Windows XP, to make sure you install it on only one
> >computer. I experienced this a few days ago, and since I was unable to
> >connect to the Internet after installation, I had to phone the code into
> >Microsoft.
> >
> >1) Question: what if I decide to uninstall Windows XP from this computer

and
> >install it on another one instead? When I go to activate XP, how will
> >Microsoft know that I have actually uninstalled it from my other

computer,
> >especially if I don't go online at all so they can "read" my other

computer?
>
> Two different answers, depending on your specific Windows XP License.
>
> - Windows XP Retail License - The software comes in a Green (Home) or
> Blue (Pro) Microsoft retail box. That software is licensed to the
> purchaser and may be moved from computer to computer to computer at
> the discretion of the purchaser, provided that it is only ever
> installed on a single computer at any given point in time.
>
> Insofar as validating the uninstall is concerned, Microsoft will take
> your word for it. However if you ever do have it on more than one
> computer and you do major hardware changes so as to require
> reactivation then the fecal matter may impact the impeller.


Wouldn't Microsoft again just take your word that you have done the
uninstallation on the other computer?

>
> >
> >2) And what if I have to reinstall XP on my computer for technical

reasons?
> >How will they know this is simply a reinstall, and not a new

installation?
> >Does the code that XP spits out once installed include some kind of

unique
> >ID for the computer it was installed on?

>
> If you reformat and reinstall on the same computer then the activation
> control files on the hard drive will have been erased and you will
> have to reactivate.


I reinstalled XP on my computer without reformatting (I chose the "upgrade"
installation, instead of the completely-new install, when given the choice
by the CD), and still had to activate XP.


When you reactivate the new control information
> is compared to the activation information currently on file at
> Microsoft and if it is the same, or within the allowable tolerance,
> then the reactivation will proceed automatically.


But if you install on a new computer with the full retail license version,
don;t they just take your word, no matter what the tolerances?

>
> >
> >3) Do I have a fully-licensed version of XP Home, the one that came with

my
> >new Dell? Because there isn't a real manual that came with it, like the

one
> >that came with my Windows 98SE Upgrade that I bought. I only have a very
> >small leaflet.

>
> You have a licensed version of XP Home, no doubt about that, but it is
> what is called an OEM version. For a variety of reasons it is still
> called Microsoft Windows but in reality it should perhaps be referred
> to as "Dell Windows, licensed from Microsoft".



Exactly. And that is probably why I wasn't charged the same price as the
full retail version by Dell.

>
> Because it is an OEM version the End User License Agreement has some
> specific terms and conditions that are different from those associated
> with the retail versions of Windows XP. The major difference is that
> licenses for OEM versions of Windows are permanently locked to the
> first computer that they are installed on and may be be legitimately
> moved to another computer under any circumstances, even if the
> original computer is lost, scrapped, destroyed, or stolen - the
> license goes with it and suffers the same fate.
>
> You should familiarize yourself with the terms and conditions of the
> Windows License for your specific computer. These are contained in
> the file EULA.TXT in the c:\windows\system32 folder.
>


Thanks. I will look at this file.

> >
> >4) Finally, the leaflet I have for XP says you are allowed to use XP for

30
> >days before being required to activate it. This was not the case when I
> >reinstalled it on my new Dell. It would not let me access my computer

until
> >I activated it, either via the Internet or via telephone. I had to walk

to a
> >payphone to do this. I did not like how Microsoft held my computer

hostage
> >during this time. It should have given me an option to immediately

uninstall
> >XP. Plus, what about people who fail to activate XP after 30 days? Does
> >their computer self-destruct, or does it revert back to their old OS?
> >(Aside: "destruct" above was flagged by my Microsoft Office dictionary

for
> >being misspelled!).
> >

>
> The 30 days is on a newly installed copy.
>


including if you reformat and reinstall XP, or if you choose "completely new
install" on the CD without reformatting?

> If you had been allowed to uninstall Windows XP, what operating system
> would have been in place on the computer? I thought you said that
> your Dell computer came with Windows XP preinstalled in which case
> there would have been nothing to go back to even if an uninstall
> option was provided.



I had the original version of XP installed by Dell, which actually was still
functional. I just overwrote it with the reinstall. If it weren't able to be
activated for whatever reason (say I was too lazy to make the phone call),
it should have gone back to the Dell-installed XP version, since there was
no reformat.

>
> For more information about Windows Activation see MVP Alex Nichol's
> article at http://aumha.org/win5/a/wpa.htm
>
> For more information about OEM software see my article at
> http://onlinehelp.bc.ca/oem_software.htm
>



thanks! Already bookmarked those sites.\

J.


 
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Julie P.
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Posts: n/a
 
      06-19-2004

"Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> "Julie P." <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> news:(E-Mail Removed)
> > > "Toolman Tim" <(E-Mail Removed)> wrote in message
> > > news:(E-Mail Removed)...
> > >
> > > >
> > > > If you did an upgrade from 98, ME, 2000, etc., you would have
> > > > been given the option to uninstall. If you used the upgrade CD to
> > > > do a "clean" install, you would have to erase the HD, and
> > > > reinstall the old OS.
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ok, this makes sense.
> > >
> > > >
> > > > Apparently, you did upgrade from XP to XP. That deactivates the
> > > > OS on the computer. So it needs to be activated. And since the
> > > > computer had been in use for more than 30 days before the
> > > > upgrade, you had run out of time to activate. Catch 22.
> > >
> > >
> > > but if it deactivated the original OS, how did it know I had been
> > > using XP for more than 30 days?
> > >

>
> Simple. The "old" system still had files in place with dates on them more
> than 30 days old. You didn't format the drive, so the original files were
> still there. The system still knew the date it was first used, hence, 30
> days from THAT date had already expired. That is exactly what I was

talking
> about the first time regarding using the XP "Repair" function from the OS
> CD.


oh, was there an easier way to do that, rather than reinstall? like this
"Repair" function? And if I had chosen to not reformat, but do a completely
new installation of XP (the Dell CD gives you the option to do that or just
do the XP upgrade), would I still not have had another 30 days, since the CD
would have been able to see files older than 30 days old?

>
> > > >
> > > > Why did you upgrade XP to XP? Home to Pro?
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> > > Because I had to reinstall XP because I thought I had problems with
> > > IE and OE, as well as other problems. I though reinstalling XP
> > > would solve these problems. Geez...sometimes I hate Microsoft!

>
> Not me. I understand fully why they want this activation stuff. Do you

have
> any clue how many pirated copies of earlier versions of Windows exist out
> there? Or MS Office? IMO, they have the right to protect their

intellectual
> property from theft, just like I have the right to protect my home from
> theft.



Yes, true. But I wonder whatever has happened to the concept of ownership of
anything. In other words, if I own the CD, it is my CD to do with as I see
fit. Not that I would violate the license, but I am just arguing a point.
Don't I have a right to make a backup copy in case I scratch the original
CD? Or will Microsoft mail me another CD if the original is damaged and I
have the license? Another argument is that maybe if software weren't so
expensive, people wouldn't need to pirate it, like they do in Thailand (just
read an article about that--although they do it here in the US too). It's
funny how Microsoft can sell the same software from anywhere from $50 to
$200, depending on where you live or if you are a student, etc.


>
> As for the "other" MS problems, most, if not all, are caused not by MS
> software (OS, Office, IE, OE, etc.) but by hackers, trojans, spyware,

other
> malware, poorly written applications from other vendors, and even
> operator/user errors. I have systems at work that have been running

trouble
> free literally for years. And others - same hardware, same software,
> different *users* - that get screwed up all the time.


True. I find that it is often software conflicts that cause problems, or
user error or misunderstanding or panic or ignorance. Sometimes, for
example, Norton can neither fix nor quarantine the virus, so this makes
users panic. So they go to Symantec's site and try to delete registry keys
as instructed, but then the instructions get too complex, and they give up.
Or the instructions didn't really apply to the user. At least, this happened
to me a few years ago. As it turned out, Norton did actually quarantine the
virus, but the message they gave was wrong.


 
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